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OUK LONDON CORRESPONDENT.

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, NEvVS NOTES.

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NEvVS NOTES. GENERAL severe repulse at Storr. berg was distinctly unwelcome, but such checks are bound to be encountered by forces to whom the fighting ground is unfamiliar whenever they advance upon a foe who has had time to en- trench. And the irregular country about S ormberg would in any case favour the Boer soldiery, who know all about kopjes" and the broken-up nature of the bulk of South Africa. The British officer who has to rely on native or Hollander guides is at a distinct disadn1.ntage,altogether apart from the honesty or otherwise of those he is compelled to engage. When it comes to a question of a British force choosing the battlefield, and essaying a fair trial with the Boers, we may hear a different tale told. Meanwhile Buller, White, Methuen, and the rest have been handicapped by having insufficient forces for the task in hand, especi- ally as regards the supply of artillery and cavalry. This difficulty should shortly now be removed. IT is indeed surprising to find what resources the Boers have provided themselves with in the way of arms and ammunition. They may not be precisely a military people, but to de- scribe them as a race of poor and simple farmers is at any rate a misnomer. They must necessarily have been arming for the fray in an expensive way for a very long time past. We know now how wrong we were to permit such a menace to im- portant parts of our Empire. Xever again" must it happen, to quote the words of a re- sponsible Minister of the Crown. And some way must be devised of making the interests that have been the real occasion of the costly and sanguinary campaign bear the expense, in so far as money can wipe out the dreadful trial of war. ALL the time we are hearing of gallant deeds and splendid soldiery on the part of every rank of our lighting men who have gone South to do their country's work, and we may well be proud of Tommy Atkins" and his leaders. But there is always another aspect other than that ir- radiated by glory to a battle picture wherever there are fightiug men abroad there are weeping women and children at home. The nation must accept it as a sacred duty to assuage the grief of thA stricken; and when we urge that this is the nation's bounden duty we mean that it behoves us all individually to do our best to discharge it according to the oppor- tunities within our compass. The great wave of patriotism sweeping through the Empire has happily loosened the purse strings promisingly and we trust that the funds will flow fully and freely through the best channels as long as the occasion may require. There is no time to pay like the present: obligations for bene- fits attained are apt to be forgotten if not promptly discharged. So we echo, to all, the strung Kiplingesque injunction, Pay! pay pay We do not say give but pay This wo owe to Tommy "-we must not think of what we are to do as charity, but look upon our moiety of disbursement as at once incumbent and privileged. We hope and trust that the large funds now swelling on every hand will be administered with big- hearted wisdom and gratifying celerity. ArTER an open autumn, we go-i: the other day a quick-change demonstration of how variant the British climate can be. Cokl winds, hard frost, and snow, came in matP parts of the country, and found some of us unprepared. But such weather is more seasonaoie than belated mildness; and seasonable conditions suit the majority. One lilies tj have a cold snaiJ" commencing just prior to Christmastido and continuing into the New Yaar. It hardly looks like "Yule otherwise, and generally speaking in Britain it is best. There is a world of homely English wisdom in the old folk saying: "A green Christmas makes a fat churchyard." But the oltl and the feeble and the very poor feel the sudden big drop intern pcrature very trying to them,and we should do out utmost just now to alleviate their lot. The poor we have always with us let us not neglect their claims because we are remember- ing Tommy Atkins" and his dear ones warmly. Tommy himself would be the last to desire it, though Kipling has christened him an Absent-minded Beggar."

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