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OUK LONDON CORRESPONDENT.

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, NEvVS NOTES.

THE PROMOTION OF GEN ERAL!…

WILL CORDITE BE DISUSED ?

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"WEEK'S TEll GAHEN HEAME?"

THE SCENE OF THE QUEEN'S i

GENERAL SYMONS' FUNERAL.

PRISONERS AT CAPE TOWN. !

BRAVERY IN THE FIELD.

AFTER THE WAR.

SIR HARRY JOHNSTO}.""S. MISSION.

AETHERIC TELEGRAPHY IN THE…

PRINCE OF WALES AND WAR HORSES.…

FRENCH SUPERSTITION.

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A SERGEANT'S EXPERIENCES.1

A PLUCKY CHAPLAIN.

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A PLUCKY CHAPLAIN. The Rev. A. A. J. Andrews, Congregational minister, of Durban, who volunteered to go to the front as honorary chaplain to the Natal Mounted Rifles, in which corps many of his congregation are enrolled, sends a description of Elandslaagte from Ladysmith to his atred father, who is a Congrega- tional minister at Woburn, near the Duke of Bed- ford's estate. The Lancers, who were mistaken by the Boers in the growing darkness for a body of their own men, fell upon them and turned a rout into a wild flight. Commander Schiel was very furious at losing the battle, and said he would like to kill every man, woman, and child in Natal. In this he was the ex- ception to i he rule, for the captives whom we liberated said the Boers had treated them with greai kindness. After the battle Dr. Donnybrook and I spent the night on the field of battle, find also followed the retreating Boers for a distance of six or seven miles, searching for and tending the wounded and dying. In the early hours of the mcrning we came to a Boer Field Hospita! and shouting out 'Doctorand Predicant,' we entered and rested, and slept there awhile. By daybreak we were out. again. Aoout. six miles from camp Dr, Bonny brook rode up to 25 mounted and armed Boers, aud told them they were his prisoners. Order- ing two to the weapons of their comrades, he marched them into camp prisoners. For an unarmed man to accomplish alone this was an exceedingly brave thing to do. After the battle one of the cap- tured held up his gnn and said Look through this. I have not fired a shot. I am a Britisher. They forced me to come.' The attack on the Free State Boers who have come within seven miles of Ladv- smith I cannot describe. How the bullets spattered around They sang and whistled and screamed. It was like a rain of hail, tho dust jumped up. and we could count the bullets by hundreds and thousands. Once when we were gathered behind a kopje a gun flashed in the distance, and an awful screaming passed over us within two yards of our heads, bursting in the rear. We were ordered to move our position at once before a second shell came. Some of the men skulked and hid and crouched, and in their fright, rushed across the fire-swept valley and lajtdown behind the stones. I saw one man fall into a hollow, and ran up to him thinking he was wounded, bur. found he was hiding from fear. Or course he soon came along. On the whole, though, the men did grandly, and were as brave as you could wish them to be. Cullingworth's horsa was shot under him, and a bullet passed through the fleshy part of his leg. Only this morning did he find it out, and he has gone off to the hospital. All night he thought he.lntd sromach-ache through drink- ing a bottle of beer, but this morning, when he un- dressed to wash, ho found his clothes soaked with blood, and the doctor told him he was shot. Yesterday we had'a fierce battle. We left camp at two o'clock in the morning and rushed a hill, which we occupied till two o'clock in the afternoon. While the bullets were flying thickly on the hill uid the men were lying on their stomachs. I pulled up big stones and Iniih. them up in front of them to shield theui from harm. At two we retreated very hastily aud in great. disorder to the cam p. I was the last to leave the hill, and shortly after overtook a dismounted man who was tired cut, I made him mount my horse, and ran hard myself for over 500 yards. Then I was obliged to mount behind another man to re- gain my wind, and we slowly jogged along until the man who was on my horse found that he could ride on an artillery waggon. I took my own horse again, and off we went, but immediately after I saw an infantry man sh jt through the stomach with a Mauser bullet. I put him on my horse and led him and the horse for five miles into camp and to the hospital. I had nothing to drink until three p.m., and was very sick through exhaustion, but, am all right again. On Sunday night we had a service in an open tent—officers and men stood around. We sang, read, and I pleaded with them earnestly to love and fear God. Lieutenant Clapham was deeply interested and moved. In yesterday's battle he fell shot through the heart. I have now been through three battles. The second was the severest in infantry fire. The Mauser bullets dropped round us by hundreds. This time we have learnt what artillery fire is. No one much considers the ping and the thud of a bullet; unless it comes Tery close it is no more noticed than a hailstone. But what we do not like i& a shell screaming a few feet above head."

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ROYAL ACADEMY STUDENTS.

"ELIJAH" AT WINDSOR.

MINER'S THRILLING ESCAPE FROM…

THE WARWICK HOSTEL.

THE BOERS AND KHAKI.

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GERMAN EXPLORATION IN EAST…

ZULU LOYALTY TO ENGLAND.

IMPORTING SERVANTS-

A NEGRO BURNED ALIVE.

,..V -■ MR. CHAPLIN ON TUE…