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OUK LONDON CORRESPONDENT.

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, NEvVS NOTES.

THE PROMOTION OF GEN ERAL!…

WILL CORDITE BE DISUSED ?

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"WEEK'S TEll GAHEN HEAME?"

THE SCENE OF THE QUEEN'S i

GENERAL SYMONS' FUNERAL.

PRISONERS AT CAPE TOWN. !

BRAVERY IN THE FIELD.

AFTER THE WAR.

SIR HARRY JOHNSTO}.""S. MISSION.

AETHERIC TELEGRAPHY IN THE…

PRINCE OF WALES AND WAR HORSES.…

FRENCH SUPERSTITION.

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A SERGEANT'S EXPERIENCES.1

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A SERGEANT'S EXPERIENCES. 1 Sergeant J. Freeman, of the 1st King's Royal Rifle, writing from Ladysmith, on October 31 and November 1, to his brother, admits that they had a rough time. Describing the artillery duel at Glencoe, he says thej ducked and dodged the enemy's shells, most of which, however, flew harmlessly overhead. The ad- vance,' he continues, was carried on under a very heavy fire, and we went across the open in skirmish- ing order, every now and then dropping and firine; volleys at the Boers' position on Talana Hill. The enemy's rifle fire played havoc with our troops. When the foot of the hill was reached the enemy poured in on us a terrific fire from rifles and those terribieNorden- feldt quiek-firing:Runs. The latter were going plunk, plunk, plunk, as fast as the very d—1 can run. We were what you may call playing hop-scotsh—literally hopping and skipping over them as best we could. The order was given by General Symons to storm the hill. He called out, Forward, the Rifles, the gallant 60th. and take that Well our Colonel (Colonel Gunning) then called out, Advance,' and threatened that he would shoot any man he saw hanging back. He turned and led the way, and in a minute or so he was shot dead. It was terrible work storming that hill. Several of our men picked up Mauser rifles, bandoliers full ofummunition, bags and satchels, and waterproof mackintoshes, and caught some ponies belonging to the Boers. One of the prisoners I had handed over to me was named Coorad Cronje. He was one of tho leaders, a commandant, I believe. He was well-dressed in plain c.othes, and was fully armed. I took over his arms and searched him. From his bandolier and satchel I took, I daresay. 250 rounds of ammunition, and then I felt through his pockets, in one of which I found 30 rounds. He had plenty of money, notes, and coin (Dutch and English), besides documents and other papers, and a watch and chain. I took all the documents and everything except his watch and chain and money. The same proceeding was gone through with the other prisoners. By the way, two of them were English (commandeered) and one a German. I had to stay on guard that night, which made three nights I had no sleep." Describing the march to Ladysmith, he says "All night we marched through mire and over rocks. It was pitch dark. We crossed rivers up to our waists, and all the time it was raining hard. We were not- allowed to smoke nor to strike matches. We were so tired that at every halt we would drop down on the wet ground to rest. In fact, we were all mora or less asleep-asleep walking. We marched a distance of nearly 80 miles since we left Glencoe to the time we reached Lidysmith. We went very near Rorke's Drift. During an engagement the day before yesterday outside Ladysmith the Gloucester Bat- talion and about three companies of the Royal Irish Fusiliers were led by two of the enemy's spies (who were. unfortunately, engaged by our authorities to conduct them into camp) into the very midst of the Boer camp. A very neat trap, indeed. Of course they were overwhelmed and broken into small parties, and the whole of them taken prisoners. They wero then despatched in several special trains to Pretoria. We often have cause for a little merriment. To-day the men of our battalion had some fun and excitement in chasing some pigs. They had belonged to a farmer around here, a Natal Boer, who had left his farm and gone over to the enemy. Our men caught 16 of his piga, and to-night they are cooking them and eating them by the wood fires. They sit around the fires eating and telling tales and jokes and roara of laughter. Just like the British, is it not

A PLUCKY CHAPLAIN.

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ROYAL ACADEMY STUDENTS.

"ELIJAH" AT WINDSOR.

MINER'S THRILLING ESCAPE FROM…

THE WARWICK HOSTEL.

THE BOERS AND KHAKI.

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GERMAN EXPLORATION IN EAST…

ZULU LOYALTY TO ENGLAND.

IMPORTING SERVANTS-

A NEGRO BURNED ALIVE.

,..V -■ MR. CHAPLIN ON TUE…