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CORRESPONDENCE.

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INONCONFORMIST CHAPEL PRACTICES.

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NONCONFORMIST CHAPEL PRACTICES. DISCUSSION AT THE FREE CHURCH COUNCIL. The members of the Barry Free Church Council resumed their discussion at their meet- ing on Tuesday e\ ening last on the pertinent queries promulgated by the Rev Christmas J. Lewis at a form- r meeting, which were pub- lished at the time in the HERALD. Mr E. B. Smith-Jones (tin; president) occupied the chair, and was supported by a large attendance. It will be remembered that chief among the questions desired by the rev gentleman to be discussed were the system of paying compli- mentary visits by the pastor to his people, and whether they were of any spiritual benefit, the methods of advertising the subject, making the services attractive, and other practices coun- tenanced and encouraged ut the present time. Mr J. O. Davies, who at the last meeting moved the adjournment of the debate, re- opened the discussion, and animadverted upon the extremely pertinent suggestions made by the Rev Christmas Lewis. It was not always that they came into conflict with their minis- ters (be said), yet it would be wise if they did so with the same frankness as had been exhibited by the rev. gentleman. He resisted with some spirit the statement, or at least the suggestion, that pastoral visitation was de- moralising, and claimed that if done voluntarily it had an elevating effect. Very often it assisted to remove doubt and anxiety from those whom circumstances were burdening. There were disclosures made to a minister, too, which no layman could ever extract. It was not necessary, in order to do good, to go to the homes of the people with a Bible in hand, but it was necessary to know some- thing of the social condition of the people before a minister could touch their hearts and lead them to a higher and better state. Bodily sickness was not the most painful suffering there was the sickness of circumstances which weighed down a heart more surely. This was, he claimed, also a means of study by cultivating the power of observation. As for making their services attractive it was their duty to do any- thing unless they violated a great principle among Christian men to do anything rather than see a man go to the devil. (Cheers). The discussion was continued in an edifying manner by the Rev J. Mydyr Evans, who did not think they should take the Rev Christmas Lewis's declarations as being made with any other object than for raising discussion and thus doing good. His indictment was one for laymen to answer. The Rev Aaron Davies said he had known gteat mischief to result from visiting, while there was no doubt also that it bad in some cases served an excellent purpose. He had himself known a casual conversation over a cup of tea to lead to the conversion of a man. The laymen should in the ordinary cases do the visiting and leave the pastor to do it when special circumstances required. Rev W. D. Lee Cann declared that he did not like anything of an artificial character in connection with his people. The Rev T. Pandy John strongly supported the practice of visiting the homes of the people to enjoy friendly interchange of ideas and strive to strengthen their religious desires. Often he had found a word at the fireside to have more influence than that from the pulpit. Mr S. R. Jones said that if there was any fault with the diaconate of the churches, it was because the churches selected the busiest men to fill the office. The Rev Ben Evans retorted that the churches selected the busiest men because they knew from experience that these would find time to do the work devolving upon them. One minister was asked by another how many people he could visit in a day? "Really (he replied) I couldn't say. How many can you ?'' "Oh (he reiterated) I visit 30 in a day." That minister was from the place in six months. (Laughter.) The object of visiting ought to be to try and leave the family better than they found it. (Hear, hear.) The President, in closing the debate, declared that a minister visited his people not alone for the good he could do them, but for the good they often did to him.

FOOTBALL NOTES.

SOUTH WALES & MONMOUTHSHIRE…

SNAP SHOTS.

SUCCESS OF BARRY VOLUNTEERS.

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