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. OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENT.…

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OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENT. The destruction of the Mahaist armv and the killing of the Khalifa himself have served this week to home to all of us the fact that we have trouble in the Soudan as well as In South Africa but the manner in which ths news was received in London was a striking proof of how difficult it is for the general publia to be keenly interested in more than one topia at a. time. Had the intelligence arrived a twelvemonth ago. when we were all still flushed with the victory of Omdurmsn, it would have created much excitement: but we are all just now so absorbed with the Boers that it made extremely little sensation. AK for the fortunes of war further south, we havo all been passing through an anxious time during the last fort night, and the waiting-room at the War Office has again been witnessing a succes- sion of sad scenes. The patience with which hour after hour on the day after a battle, relatives of the soldiers engaged in the fight, wait for news of the casualties? is one of the saddest sights to be seen in the London of to-day, while the outbursts of un- controllable grief when the dreaded list is posted up are sufficient to wring the heart of even those most accustomed to the scene. It can well be understood that the Queen is intensely gratified at the manner in which the whole nation has received the announce- ment of her intended gift to every man now 3erving at the front, and her Majesty is cur- rently reported to have expressed that gratifi- cation to her entourage. The thoughtful kindliness of the act has even strengthened her Majesty's hold upon the hearts of her people: and it has come at a moment when her subjects were keenly feeling the insults which had been levelled at their Fenerable Sovereign by some of the more coarse-minded journalists of France. These outrages, both by pen and pencil, have reached such an unutterable depth that general credence is accorded to the report thata plain hint has been given, a plain hint that unless they im- mediately cease the Prince of Wales will con- fine his assistance to the Paris Exhibition of next year to the most formal limits. It is a striking fact that it was not until after this had been very generally rumoured that the Paris police received directions to seize the more loathsome of these prints: the French Government will now be looked to as bound to continue to keep a restraining hand upon them, if this be not done, thousands of English folk who had determined to visit the Exhibition will decline to go. and that is a prospect which the Paris tradesman will scarcely contemplate with equanimity. In many a way. the feeling of the country that the reservists who have been called to the Colours should be treated handsomely, is being given practical expression. This has not only taken the shape of raising large funds for the benefit of the wives and children who are left at home. and of the action of a number of the best employers in paying towards the mainten- ance of these while the bread-winner is away. but the friendly societies are now moving in the matter with excellent result. It appears that the Executive Council of the London Unity of Oddfellows, which has branches all orer England and Wales, has recommended those lodges which have members on active service in South Africa to keep them" in compliance" by paying their contributions from the management or incidental funds. There is no surprise in hear- ing that the lodges have taken up the point in It patriotic manner, and are about to act on the suggestion: and it may be taken for granted that others of our great friendly societies, which do so excellent a work, will adopt the idea in their own way. Next summer, the Society for the Propaga- tion of the Gospel in Foreign Parts will enter opon its bi-centennial year, it having been founded in London towards the close Ö of the reign of William III., while among the earliest of its public appearances was to present an address of congratulation to Anne upon her accession to the throne. The occasion is to be 3pecially celebrated, as is only natural, and it may be taken for certain that the celebration will be a worthy one. It is striking to recall that the earliest effort of the long familiar S.P.G." was directed towards those American colonies of ours which have now become the United States: and it makes the proud claim that the Church in that country, which has now some eighty-four bishops and 4692 clergymen, grew from the work it established by sending in all over three hundred missionaries. At the present time, with an annual income of nearly £32°:000, it has in its service about 3000 European and native missionaries, and in South Africa its labours have been particularly fruitful, a fact' which is not at all likely to be forgotten during the bi-centenary celebration next year. Manifestations have come from all parts of the country of the widespread sympathy felt by those of all parties and creeds with the Prime Minister because of the death of Lady Salisbury; and this general joining in a common grief is a proof of the national unity in tlie best sense, which no one more than that statesman is in a position to fitly estimate. It is being remarked as noteworthy that this is the only instance during the present reign of a Prime Minister's wife dying while her husband was in office. Save in the cases of Lords Melbourne. Aberdeen, Beaconsfield, and Rosebery, and now Lord Salisbury, the Queen's Prime Ministers have been sur- rived by their wives: and the instance of that venerable lady, Mrs. Gladstone, who is still among us is the most striking at this moment. Owing to the natural wish of Lord Salisbury, that the departed one should rest at Hatfield, London had little opportunity for publicly displaying its grief: but the reality of its sorrow was shown not only by the unanimous resolutions of its County Council and School Board, but by the highly representative attendance at the memorial service at the Chapel Royal, St. Jameses. It seems early to the outsider to be talking in the first days of December about the inter- University Boat Race which, in the accus- tomed fashion, will take place next spring but at the Universities themselves this is very far from the view that would be taken. So far is it, indeed, that the Saturday of this week has been fixed for both the Oxford and Cam- bridge Trial Eights, the Oxonians doing their trial at Maulsford. and the Cantabs at Ely. The twc Oxford ights are declared by ex- gjrts to be shaping well, but those of ambridge are averred to be more finished." It is far too soon, however, to talk of their being finished, and the average man will prefer the more "beefy" crews, as being likelv to train far better- As far, though, as the general public is concerned, the main point is that demonstration is already clear that both the Universities will be able to put forward a very powerful representative crew; and the old battle will, therefore, be once more contested ir the best fashion. R.

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