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DEATH OF LADY SALISBURY.

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DEATH OF LADY SALISBURY. The Marchioness of Salisbury died peacefully at Hatfield House at 2.30 on Monday afternoon, in the presence of Lord Salisbury and those members of the family near town. Her death was not unexpected, for her ladyship was in advanced years, and had suffered a long and painful illness, borne with Christian fortitude, of wnich the end was in no way doubtful.- A year or so ago dropsical symptoms manifested themselves, and Lady Salisbury's only chance of staving off a fatal termination of the ailment was to submit to a series of operations for relief from the distressing symptoms accompanying the complaint. It was due to her ladyship's splendid constitution, and the skill of the eminent surgeons who bad charge of her case, that good results were attained, and for a time it looked as though she had made a lasting recovery. But the members of her family were aware that the measures adopted could only temporarily relieve, and not avert a fatal termination, and the marchioness herself was conscious of the unavoidable end. On the occasion of a notable garden party given at Hatfield many months ago her ladyship took an affecting farewell of some of her younger relatives, and was then heard to express the conviction that she would not live to see the anniversary of the occasion. Her ladyship managed to make her customary sojourn at Beaulieu a few months back, but was very poorly on her return to England. In conse- quence she proceeded to Walmer instead of returning direct to Hatfield. There, as will be remembered, the patient became seriously ill, and for a time daily bulletins as to her progress were issued officially either from Walmer or in London. Two months back Lady Salisbury had recovered sufficiently to travel to Hatfield, but she made the journey in an invalid carriage, and it was arranged that she should travel over the different railway companies' systems without change, so that she might make the trip with a minimum of inconvenience. Since her return to Hatfield House Lady Salisbury had been very unwell, with short intervals of better health, in one of which she was able to take carriage exercise a few weeks ago, and at an even more recent date she was able to get out in an invalid chair. Latterly she bad kept to her room, and for nearly a fortnight was more or less uncon- scious. Her critical condition was kept extremely quiet, and the only public intimation of an approach- ing crisis was revealed in the frequent visits of specialists to Hatfield. While at Walmer Lady Salisbury benefited greatly by the treatment of Dr. Walker, and it wae arranged that he should accom- pany her to London. He made almost daily visits to Hatfield, and during the latter part of her lady- ship's illness he was constantly there. When the marchioness breathed her last at 2.30 on Monday afternoon, almost the only near relative absent from the house was Major Lord Edward Cecil, who is with the forces at Mafeking, and this fact alone would indicate that the end was expected. The death of Lady Salisbury has cast a great gloom over Hatfield, where her unostentatious kind- ness and charity Were appreciated at their true worth. The tenants' ball, which usually takes place early in December, will probably be postponed or held elsewhere than at Hatfield House, and for many months to come the village will show signs of the mourning which it feels and the sorrow and sym- pathy for the bereaved family which have been evoked by her ladyship's death. The news of the death of the Marchioness of Salis- bury reached Windsor Castle by the evening, and messages of condolence with the Prime Minister in his bereavement were sent by the Queen and the Prince and Princess of Wales. It is understood that the Queen, on hearing of Lady Salisbury's death. at once released the Premier from his obligation to attend the State banquet. In London the announcement of the death of Lady Salisbury was received with sincere regret, and with a feeling of profound sympathy with the Premier, whose bereavement falls upon him at an anxious political juncture. Immediately on hearing the sad intelligence the Lord Mayor, on behalf of the citizens of London, telegraphed to the Marquis of Salisbury, offering his most earnest condolence and sympathy. Georgina, Lady Salisbury, was a daughter of the late the Hon. Sir Edward Hall Alderson, a Baron of the Court of Exchequer, and her marriage with the Premier, then Lord Robert Cecil, took place in 1857, so that their wedded life has extended well over a period of 40 years. The deceased In.dy leaves five sons and two daughters, the former being Viscount Cranborne, M.P., the Rev. Lord William Cecil, rector of Bishop's Hatfield, Lord Robert Cecil, Q.C., Major Lord Edward Cecil, D.S.O., who is taking part with Colonel Baden-Powell in the gallant defence of Mafeking, and Lord Hugh Cecil. M.P. Of her two daughters the elder is the wife of Lord Selborne, Under-Secre- tary for the Colonies, and Lady Gwendolen Cecil is unmarried. Lady Salisbury was a Lady of the Imperial Order of the Crown of India, and a Lady of the Royal Order of Victoria and Albert, these two decorations having been conferred upon her by the Queen. It ie to be noted as a melancholy coincidence that two of Lord Salisbury's colleagues in the Cabinet, Sir Matthew White-Ridlev and Mr. Goschen, have suffered a similar bereavement during the last 12 months.

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