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SARAH BERNHARDT'S ACTIVITY.

WHEAT CROPS OF THE WORLD.

ITHE BOERS AS SHOOTERS.

BLACK SEA NAVAL SCANDAL.

WARNING TO LAMP-USERS.

A GIANT GAS ENGINE.

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FUTURE PRICE OF IRON.

A BRITISH EMBASSY'S TABLE…

THE "SIX-TOE HIGGINSES."

DANCING AT THE PAJUS IEXHIBITION.

MAITRES LABORI AND DEMANGE.

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FEARLESS LONDON LADY.

A UNIQUE MOUNTAIN TOWN.

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A UNIQUE MOUNTAIN TOWN. II>isti'i!is. a itule village seated amid the White MONNIM'TIJ! on the boundary between Maine and New llampjlnre, is the most unique town in the United States, if not in the world, says a writer in the New York Times. It con'ains over 300 inhabitants at all times of the year, and in the winter months. when the lumber camps are full, the popu- lation is doubled. It has two large manu- facturing establishments, business houses, fine re- sidences, a post-office, telephone and telegraph offices, an electric lighting plant, a railroad, a school, and churches. Tn fact, it has every con- venience that a town can possibly have, yet it is not town or city, or plantation, or even an incor- porated place, and the visit of the tax collector is an unknown thing. The territory where the village is located was granted to Richard Batchei- der by the State of Massachusetts in 1797, and 60 years ago four families moved there from Frye- burg, in the western part. of Oxford County. Me. They cleared away about 100 acres of land and built several log cabins. A few years later they were obliged to abandon the settlement on account of the appearance of "Nigger Tom," a runaway slave, who announced to the terrified settlers that he had been" sent by the Lord" to take the pro- perty which they had worked hard foryears to clear. Then the village was named Nigger Tern's Settle- ment," and was known as that until about 1850, when G. A. and D. R. Hastings purchased over 20,000 acres of the land, and the Wild River Lumber Company of New Hampshire took 40.000 acres. Since then the town has grown with great rapidity, every nation being represented. On any pay day the most cosmopolitan gathering of types from all parts of the earth may be seen in the village store, when they call to settle their weekly grocery bills. The homes have a foreign aspect. Those of the main street are about 40ft. wide by 40ft. deep, two stories high, square like immense dry goods boxes, painted Venetian red. without blinds, and each with six rooms on a floor. They are com- fortable and are kept in good repair. Every house is surrounded by huge piles of lumber giving it the appearance of a town within a stockade. The larger buildings are bound to the earth by huge chains to protect them from the fierce gales which blow down the mountain sides. The most remark- able thing about this remarkable town is the absence of crime. Notwithstandingthe heterogeneous population there are no police. There was a con- stable in the place up to two years ago, but when his commission expired it was impossible to find anyone to take the position. If perchance it is neces- sary to bring a person before the trial justice one of the foremen in the lumber mill goes to the culprit and tells him that his presence is desired at the company's store. There the sentence, if the man acknowledges his guilt, and he usually does, is given him by the booikeeper in the store. It it the only village in the United States where there is no carriage road. The only means of transportation to or from the village is over the railroad which runs from Gilhead to Hastings. The road follows the valley of Wild River, along a route so narrow that in many places there is barely room for the ralls, It penetrates 14 miles into the wildest defiles of the White Mountains. A ride upon it is a new experience, even to a traveller who has visited every part of the world. Along some parts of the road the grade is 400ft. to the mile. The school in the village is a unique feature. The schoolhouse was built in 1892 by the lumber companies, and the teachers are paid by a monthly contribution of 10 cents from each of the workmen in the milIa.

INSURANCE COMPANIES AND !…

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RECENT SHIPPING CASUALTIES.

! ANOTHER GOLD COUNTRY.

i |MEASURING EARTHQUAKES.

" ROPEDON MOUNT KENIA.

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