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- WAR IN SOUTH AFRICA.

TRAGEDY IN WEST AFRICA.

CURRENT SPORT.

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FUTURE OF THE TRANSVAAL. '

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FUTURE OF THE TRANSVAAL. IMPORTANT STATEMENT BY SIR M. BICRS-BEACH. Sir Michael Hicks-Beach, in a speech at Bristol 08 Monday night, said we had now every right to be sanguine as to the result, but we must not shut our eyes to this fact, that we had to deal with a brave and well-armed foe, and that there might be reverses still in store for us. But the country would face all these things with calmness. It would face them with the determina- tion to carry this thing through," whatever might be the cost to us. And why ? Because they knew that it meant the maintenance or loss of the Empire. Did they think that this was a war waged to put an end to the liberties of a small self-governing com- munity on the other side of the globe, and to govern St from Downing-street for the benefit of a few capitalists and speculators in London ? No they knew very well what it meant to the Empire. They saw in that the germ of a movement which, directed by wise counsel, should lead to real union of Empire, a union that would give cohesion and strength ia amy conflict in which we might be engaged with Powers in the world. What of the future of South Africa? He did not want to boast M one putting off his armour, but this he would say. People talked foolishly of racial animosity being caused in South Africa. Unhappily it existed already, and it was due to the contempt of the Boer for the Englishman. When the war was over, he hoped far that would be substituted mutual respect, and that that mutual respect would be the basis of friendship. There was no natural animosity between the Dutch and the English. There was some natural animos- ity between the English and the French, but what had we seen in Canada? We had seen the French Prime Minister of Canada coming forward with loyal and cordial words to say Godspeed to the contingent of his country going to aid the soldiers of the Queen. That was due to the fact that long ago Britain had established equal rights between the two races- in Canada, that, whether French or English, they were citizens of a great dominion, that they had free and complete self-government under the admitted supre- macy of the British Empire. Let us look to future South Africa in that spirit. He did not say the circumstances were identical; he did not say that precisely the same policy, so success- ful in Canada, could be pursued in South Africa. There were material difficulties; there were some things that must be carefully guarded. By this wai conventions had' been dbstroyed. We must guard against a recurrence of the war. Ample security must be taken that such a terrible evil should; never occur again. We must establish a pure and honest government on the basisf equal rights for men of all bloods: we must establish jestice, and establish these things with something better and more enduring than the paper safeguards which had proved so illusionary in the past, but subject to this should give whatever self-government might be possible. Then we might look forward to South Africa awakening to a new birth, standing like a glorious star rivalling Canada and Australia in the great con- stellation which formed the union of the British Empire.

FATAL FIRE AT KINGSLAND.

NEW LORD JUSTICE-GENERAL.

LORD ROSEBERY IN SHOREDITCH.

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IASCENT OF MOUNT KENIA.

BJORNSON AND HIS STATUE:

NO MATCH FOR "SANDY."

ABOUT A TELEGRAM.

HOW TO WRITE TO "TOMMY."

THE SERVIAN PRETENDER'S SON.

MONEY VALUE OF GOOD ROADS.

CREMATION IN JAPAN.

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"'" :EPITOME OF NEWS.

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