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- WAR IN SOUTH AFRICA.

TRAGEDY IN WEST AFRICA.

CURRENT SPORT.

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FUTURE OF THE TRANSVAAL. '

FATAL FIRE AT KINGSLAND.

NEW LORD JUSTICE-GENERAL.

LORD ROSEBERY IN SHOREDITCH.

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IASCENT OF MOUNT KENIA.

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ASCENT OF MOUNT KENIA. A representative of Reuter's Agency has had an interview with Mr. H. J. Mackind^r on his return from East Africa. in the course of which the explorer gavfj ome paricnlars of the successful.ascent of Mount Xenia. Of the first pari, of his journey Mr. Mackinder saiid: From Monibassa along the whole route of the rail- way there were dreadful scenes, caused by the famine, especially in the Wakamba country. Living skeletons collected round the various stations begging for a morsel of food to keep them alive. Th" woods neasr Nairobi station were full of dead bodies-. Leaving the Uganda line at rail-hend, they struck north across the Athi plains, and entered a cultivated belt, where they met with a considerable amount of hostility from the treacherous Wakikuyu people, who shoot poisoned arrows. They next got into Meranga, a magnificent country to the south- west of Kama, every yard of which was under culti- vation. After leaving Meramba, the expedition entered a great forest belt. The chief Wanganibe harries this country and ambushed and killed two-of the porters. After traversing his country they entered a foodless district on the western foot of Kenia, reaching the base of the mountain at the beginning of September. Kenia (said Mr. Mackinder), is a huge dome fully 30 miles across. Rising from the summit of this dome is a great pyramid of rock with two smaller peaks at the top—one 40ft. or 50ft. higher than the other. Round the base of this pyramid, glaciers reflect the rays of the tropical sun, and from there radiate a number of valleys. On all s-ides except the north I the mountain is surrounded with a- belt of forest. From our base, which was-at the-west side and at the foot of the forest, we had to cut a path through the forest for a distance of 3000ft. up. the mountain slope. Between the forest and the glaciers we were surprised to find signs of inhabitants— elephant hunters-who were even more timid and mysterious than the natives of Meranga. As-high as 11,000ft. we found traces of elephant. It was only at the third attempt that we succeeded in reaching tho summit, and this took 34 hours, starting from our 13,000ft. camp. During the first attempt darkness overtook us while-we were 00 the arete, and we were unable to go either up or down, and we had to remain on a narrow ledge of rock- We roped ourselves-to the rocks behind, and for 12 hours slapped and rubbed our limbs- to prevent them fuom getting frozen. After remaining on the summit, which was over 17.000ft., the party returned to the 13,000ft. camp, where they had a day's-rest. Mr. MackindtJr- and two guides then started off to go right round the mountain, and during this trip slept at night in the open. He afterwards returned to Navaisha, across the Aberdare range, and so to the coast. Mr. Mackinder spoke in the highest terms o? the assistance he received from each of the white mem- bers of his party, and hoped that no account would be published which did not associate with his name that of his chief colleague Mr. C. B. Hausberg,

BJORNSON AND HIS STATUE:

NO MATCH FOR "SANDY."

ABOUT A TELEGRAM.

HOW TO WRITE TO "TOMMY."

THE SERVIAN PRETENDER'S SON.

MONEY VALUE OF GOOD ROADS.

CREMATION IN JAPAN.

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"'" :EPITOME OF NEWS.

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