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OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENT.

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; NEWS NOTES.

FRANK BUCKLAND'S FISH MUSEUM.

A MILLIARD MINUTES.

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A LONG-SUFFERING WIFE.

THE CYCLE IN WAR. I

"EVERY MAN HIS OWN LANDLORD."

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CULTURED FILIPINOS.

TELEPHONE GIRLS AND INFLUENZA.

A HOME FOR JACK.

FIGHTING FIRES IN "SKY-I SCRAPERS."

STATUES OF SCOTCH WORTHIES.I

- HOW TO BE HAPPY THOUGH MARRIED.

GLADSTONE 'PARK.''

AMERICAN LOCOMOTIVES FOR SWEDEN.

TEETOTAL MAYORS.

GREAT FIRE IN NEW YORK.

NORTH NORFOLK ELECTION.

POISONING AT WATFORD.

IA MISSING CLERGYMAN.

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BRAVERY REWARDED.

DEATH IN CHAPEL.

MR. WALTER LONG AT TROWBRIDGE.

THE BIDDENDEN TRAGEDY.

THE CLOUDED LEOPARD.

A NEW SATELLITE OF SATURN.

COMPULSORY BALLOT FOR THE…

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COMPULSORY BALLOT FOR THE MILITIA? The following interesting and, perhaps, significant paragraph appears in the London correspondence of the Western Daily Mail: "The Service members admit that the present Government have done all that can be reasonably expected of them for the general well-being of the army, but the report of the Inspector-General of Recruiting is held to be in many respects far from satisfactory. A favourite remedy for this in the eyes of a large body of Ser- vice men who do not go the length of asking for general conscription is the revival of the old system of compulsory ballot for the militia. Captain Norton, a Radical member, warmly advocated this a few days ago, but his speech was not as widely reported as, perhaps, its importance de- served. His idea is, I believe, that every man should be compelled to go through a fixed period of training in the militia, which would at least enable him to understand the use of arms. As a matter of fact, the militia ballot is a part of the law of the realm, although its operation is suspended from year to year. Apart from what may be done in the House of Commons, I see that Lord Wemyss has given notice in the Upper House of a resolution drawing attention to the admission made by the Secretary of War that forced service in the militia may be of great importance in view of national emergencies. This refers to a discussion which took place last ses- sion, when Lord Lansdowne promised to look into the matter during the autumn, and state the views of the Government later on. The discussion, therefore, ought to be interesting, in case a statement is not made in the House of Commons beforehand as to the general views of Ministers on the matter. Presum- ably, Lord Wemyss's. idea would be to enforce the ballot in cases where men of a fixed age had not joined the volunteers. There is, of course, not the least' reason to suppose for an instant that the present Government are likely to lend themselves to a system of compulsion in ordinary times, but they may think it advisable to revive the militia law in view of any danger of actual invasion. That is almost as much as public opinion would probably tolerate, but the ideas of a number of the Service members go a good deal further."

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LION TAMER MAULED.

HAYDN'S BIRTHPLACE BURNED.

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