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WHO WINS MISS BURTON"?

THE DUBLIN CASTLE OF TO-DAY.

ENGLISH DOCTORS ABROAD.

FROM FERNANDO PO.

[No title]

' THOSE " DUPPIES."

SIR ROBERT GIFFEN.

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SIR ROBERT GIFFEN. Sir Robert Giffen is about to retire from the dis- tinguished position in the department of the Board of Trade which he has occupied for many years to the great advantage of the public service. The with- drawal of so eminent an authority on public economy and statistics from the direct service of the State must in any case (remarks The Times) be a matter for sincere regret. But in Sir Robert Giffen's case this reeret is tempered by the consideration that be retires at a time of life and in circumstances which will enable him, we trust for many years to come, still to employ his great powers of analysis and ex- position for the benefit and instruction of his countrymen, though not in an official capacity. Sir Robert Giffen has reached the age at which retirement from the Civil Service is permissive but not compulsory. It has been his privilege to occupy at the Board of Trade a position peculiarly congenial to the native bent of his mind and to the studies in economy, statistics, and finance in which he has gained such high distinction. But his important and varied achievements in an in- dependent and unofficial career suffice to show that in entering the service of the Board of Trade he gave up to a public office not a little that was really meant for mankind. In the full maturity of powers still unimpaired, though perhaps requiring greater leisure than heretofore for their exercise, he now re- sumes a position of greater freedom-we can hardly add of less responsibility for a publicist of his eminence cannot but foel that he owes a responsibility to the tribunal of sound thinking and right reason quite as great, though not exactly the same, as that which wns imposed on him by the restraints of a public office. In such circumstances, though the public service may lose, the public at large will gain. The Department over which Sir Robert Giffen has presided at the Board of Trade will still in a large measure be guided by his methods and example. But his vigorous and incisive pen will henceforth be available for the unfettered discussion of the many topics of which he is an acknowledged master. Few of his contemporaries can speak with an authority greater than his on the larger issues involved in those economical and financial problems which lesser men are so ready to solve by the too facile nostrum of the moment. A pupil of Bagehot's and imbued with the broad catholic and judicial temper of his master, Sir Robert Giffen is at once a fearless thinker, a formidable critic, and a large minded exponent of sound economical doctrine. We have not always found ourselves able to agree with him on all points, and, in particular, we have dissented strongly from his treatment of the financial aspects of the Irish question. But, just as Carlyle spoke of himself and Mill as "except in opinion not disagreeing," so we may say of Sir Robert Giffen's treatment of public questions in their economical and financial aspects that, though we may not always share his opinions or accept his conclusions, we cordially welcome the prospect afforded by his retirement of his alliance in the de- fence of many causes which we hold not less dear than he does.

I ISTRANGE DEATH.

A COSTLY WHIM.

LUCKY NON-JURYMEN.

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NEWS NOTES. -

A GOOD WORD FOR TRICYCLES.

PROFESSIONAL FINDERS.

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GARDENING GOSSIP.