Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

15 articles on this Page

WHO WINS MISS BURTON?

[No title]

HIS SIN FOUND HIM OUT:

INCOMBUSTIBLE DRESSES."

- ADVICE TO SEA BATHERS.

IA BURGLAR'S TENNIS RACQUET.

A PRIESTLESS CHURCH.

[No title]

CONVICTS INSANE.

HOME-GROWN FOOD AND HEALTH.I

EMIGRATION TO AUSTRALIA.

News
Cite
Share

EMIGRATION TO AUSTRALIA. The conspicuous manner in which the Australian representatives have figured in the recent record reign celebrations has, says a Sydney correspondent, naturally had the effect of more largely directing attention to the various colonies as fields for emigra- tion. Of the advantages afforded by them in this respect to the right class of people, there can be no question they are rich in all the materials of indus- trial progress, wealth, and greatness, and are ap. parently destined to become included among tbe leading social and political powers of the future but in their present imperfectly developed condition, paucity of population and limited means of manu- facturing production, they afford little or no induce- ment to those not connected in any way with the various branches of the pastoral, agricultural, or mining industries. For instance, a cotton weaver or a silk dyer would be as much out of place in Aus- tralia as if he were in the great Egyptian Desert. Nor are shop assistants, clerks, book-keepers and others of a similar class required, the supply always being in excess of the demand, and employment pro- curable only in the large cities and towns, the rates of wages being about the same as in the United Kingdom. In the clothing, millinery, boot and shoe, and cognate trades there is always an ample supply of cheap labour. Individuals of unsettled occupa' tion, and who, like Mr. Micawber, are always wait- ing for something to turn up," are not wanted. They invariably end their careers as vagrants of the lowest type. Even less desirable are the respectable black sheep" sent out to the colonies in the hope that under new and brighter conditions they will become changed for the better. It is very seldom that the realisation accords with the wish. Nor are shop* keepers and ordinary tradesmen much in request, the greater portion of the retail trade in the colonies being in the hands of old-established houses, tho- roughly conversant with the requirements of their customers, and keenly competing with each other in securing business. Agricultural and putoral labourers, vignerons, orchardists, butter and cheese makers, fruit pre- servers, and others of the same claes, experience little difficulty in obtaining employment, the demand varying according to the nature of the locality and the season of the year. Unskilled or partially skilled mining labourers are numerous, and of unskilled labour of every kind there is always considerably more than sufficient. The most likely class of emi- grants are families having some practical knowledge of agriculture or of mixed farming, and possessing tlufficient capital with which to make a fair start. Mere labour without capital is simply a drug in the market. In New South Wales the land system is of a most liberal character, affording every facility for the establishment of communities on a co-operative basis, and it is in this direction that fresh population would be most readily welcomed. The success of several German and Italian agricultural communi- ties in various parts of New South Wales shews what is possible in the colony. Pastoralists and agricul- turists, with experience and capital, can readily find openings for enterprise. Coal miners and mining labourers generally are not required, but experienced prospectors, men familiar with the treatment of ores, or having some knowledge of the scientific processes connected with the mining industries, can do well. There is also much to be done in the way of improved fruit cultivation, especially for export in a fresh or preserved state; preparation of essential oils from flowers; olive, tobacco, sugar, beet, silk, and rubber cultivation honey production, &c., &c.; also in the establishment of deep-sea fisheries, and the curing and preservation of fish. In fact, it is not an increase of ordinary city artisan or professional population which is required, but an augmentation of that in the ■rural and coastal districts—people conversaat with the arts of food or mineral production.

GARDENING GOSSIP. -..-

ART AND LITERATURE.

A MUCH-CAUGHT FISH.

[No title]