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--MR. HERBERT GLADSTONE AT…

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MR. HERBERT GLADSTONE AT LEEDS. On Saturday Mr. II, J. Gladstone. M.P., opened a Liberal club at Burmantofts in Leeds, and in the evening addressed a public meeting. In reply to a resolution expressing unabated confidence in the Government, he remarked, with reference to the speech of Mr. Gibson in that town on the previous evening, that that gentleman had not thrown any special light on a question exercising many of their minds viz., the leadership of the Conservative parly. Some outrageous statements made by Mr. Gibson in his speech on the Egyptian question, left it to be implied that General Gordon's mission had been fruitless and had failed, and that Gordon was in imminent and deadly peril, and the British Government had the power to save him. The mission of General Gordon was a dangerous one, and all honour to him for having undertaken it; but General Gordon was in Ivliar- toum, and the dangers he had to encounter in Khartoum at present were comparatively small when compared with the dangers he had to face when travelling through the desert on his way to Khartoum. The Tories did not remonstrate when he went to face those great perils. General Gordon, in both his official and private communications, appears to be confident that he himself and Khartoum are in no immediate danger. Nothing that he said induced the Government to think that, supposing it were possible to send an army to Khartoum to rescue him, it would be wise, or politic, or just to do so. Every week which passed improved the general chances of the success of Gordon. In the first place, it would be difficult for the various tribes in the Soudan to hold together. Dissensions must arise, and those dissensions must inevitably weaken them as far as their offensive power was concerned. In the second place, in June the Nile would begin to rise, so that it would be possible to send steamers up the whole way to Khartoum, and that might afford a comparatively easy method of withdrawing General Gordon from; Khartoum if it were necessary. Thirdly, as the j autumn approached the climate improved, and became tolerable to Europeans; and according to Gordon's own statement there was no reason to doubt that he would be able to hold out in Khartoum until the autumn. He had abundant supplies of stores, ammunition, and grain, and there was no reason for thinking there was any immediate danger from Khartoum being carried by assault. Before the autumn it was likely, it was even very probable that lie would succeed more or less in quieting the country between Khartoum and Egypt proper. At the present a military expedition would be disastrous and fruitless, and yet every word Mr. Gibson uttered pointed to the necessity of sending a military expedition to Khartoum. He called upon the Government to with- i draw General Gordon at this time. Suppose they were to do so, what would it prove ? It would prove > that the Government were wrong in sending him to Khartoum at all. If he failed now failure was I tlr certain from the first. Success was as probable now as it was probable when Gordon was despatched to ] the Soudan. They had sent one man to do a task which an army could not perform. If they sent an army now to Khartoum they would preycnt that man doing the task which an army could not perform. He was there. He accepted a dangerous mission, an heroic mission, a mission of peace, and a work of mercy, and it was an insult to the Govern- ment to say the Government were not anxious about General Gordon. He was in danger, and the Government knew it. He knew he would be in danger, but he was there for a great work. In 1879 a British Envoy, Sir Louis Cavagnari, sent there by a Tory Government, was murdered in Cabul. and the result was a second campaign in Afghanistan; and yet Mr. Gibson charged it as a crime against the present Liberal Government that Gordon was alone and unsupported at Khartoum whither he had gone for purposes of peace, and for the purpose of giving back to the people the country which should never have been taken from them, whereas a Tory Govern- ment in 1879 did not hesitate to imperil the life of a man in the interest of aggression and invasion, Mr. n. Gladstone also criticized Mr. Gibson's remarks on the present County Franchise Bill. Mr. Gibson had said the bill would not pass this session. Now that was a very serious matter, for after the magnificent majority of 130 in the popular chamber, the Government had every right and reason to demand that that bill should pass into law. After pointing out that the Government rested their case for the inclusion of Ireland in the Reform Bill on the solid foundation of justice, and expressing the opinion that there would be no dis- solution this year, he said the passing of the Reform Bill sooner or later is assured. But suppose there should be a dissolution this year, and the Tories had a slight majority, the Liberals would bring in a Reform Bill, and they would be joined by the eighty Irish members. The Tories would be absolutely unable to meet the Liberals on the question of a Reform Bill, and they could not by any possibility carry on the government of the country for six months without supporting the Reform Bill brought in by the Oppo- sition or brought in by themselves. He was, there- j fore, perfectly assured' of the passing of a Reform Bill. But whenever a dissolution came, the Liberals would meet it with confidence, because they did not fear the result of a general election.

---------FILTERING RIVER WATER.j

ADMIRAL HEWITT'S MISSION TO…

CANADIAN FINANCES.

. ARRIVAL OF tROOPS FROM EGYPT.

.',t) - CROP PROSPECTS.

.PROFITS AND POPULARITY OF…

THE FOREIGN MEAT SUPPLY.

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MR. PARNELL AND HIS RENTS.

GARDEN CROPS OF 1881,

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THE LAWS OF CRICKET.

THE DISHORNING OF CATTLE.

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--------------------"--ARC^^OLOGICAL…

FRAUDS UPON UNDERTAKERS.

-----------------THE HOP PLANT…

-------------CANADIAN NEWS.

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