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-__---------.-BLACKSMITH SCHOOL…

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BLACKSMITH SCHOOL BOYS Mosier's noonday clas, as it is called, has been in operation for several years in the blacksmith snop of Brewster and Co.'s carriage factory, at Broadway and Forty-seventh-street, New York. The shop employs about 200 men and twenty to twenty-five boys. There are no apprentices, and the boys are hired by the week and advanced as they show aptitude for the business. Mr. Mosier, who is foreman of the smith- ing shop, devotes the most of his noon liour-to the education of these boys, or such of them its are willing to learn. Some of them have had a little schooling in the public schools, but most have gone backward rather than forward since they left school. Mr. Mosier's idea comprised the preserva- tion, by exercise, of what education the boys had, as well as the development of it and its applica- tion to the practical work of the boys' lifetimes—the art of carriage building. Merely by the use of the few minutes snatched from the noon hour the practical benefit to the boys is now plainly visible. On Mondays and Tuesdays the boys study arithmetic. Examples are given on the blackboard, and oral in- struction, together with book study. On Wednesdays they are given technical- journals on carriage building to read. On Thursday they read history and ordi- nary school readers. On Fridays they again read the technical journals, of which there are half-a-dozen now printed, relating to carriage building. On Satur- day the boys study and practice free-hand drawing, copying examples from the blackboard. Each boy takes home one of the technical journals and copies from it one page each week into a book. The" Tbooks are compared, criticised, and corrected by the teacher. As fast as the boys progress they are advanced to higher grades of drawing, all leading to fit them to enter the carriage draughting school in Thirty-fourth street. In this way the boys become familiar with the accurate forms of every part of a carriage. They also learn the process of manufacturing the different parts, including the painting and finishing, even to the drawing of crests and armorial decorations. There is a chance to develop whatever peculiar talent any boy may have. The boys are taught simple bookkeeping by being required to "keep their own accounts. As a stimulus Brewster and Co. give rewards to the most proficient. Attracted by the novelty and prac- tical common sense of the thing some of the contrac- tors in the shops have given suitable rewards and a number of pupils have been sent to the Thirty-fourth street school.New York Sun.

-(Our foniion Coraspibenf.I…

tTHE QUEEN AT DARMSTADT.

ACCOUCHEMENT OF THE DUCHESS…

MASSACRE OF SOUDAN REFUGEES.

-------DEFEAT OF ZIBEBU.

FUNERAL OF-THE BISHOP OF ItrpON

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THE MAHDI TWICE DEFEATED.

I A BATTLE WITH AN ALLIGATOR.

WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE AND THE FRANCHISE…

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MR. ROBERT LINCOLN.

GAS AND THE ELECTRIC LIGHT.

ATTEMPTED MURDER IN FRANCE.

---LIGHTNING STROKES IN FRANCE.

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,._--_--------.-THE DYNAMITE…

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