Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

23 articles on this Page

A DEATH WARNING.;

News
Cite
Share

A DEATH WARNING. Towards the close of November, 1770, Lord Lyttelton had gone down from London to Pit Place for the purpose of spending a week or two in field sports or other recreation, and he had taken with him a gay party of friends. On the 24th of that month be had retired to bed at midnight, after spending the evening at cards with his guests, when his attention was attracted by the fluttering of a bird, apparently a dove or a pigeon, tapping at the window of his bed- chamber. He started, for he had only just put out his light, and was about to compose himself to rest. and sat up in bed to listen. He had gazed and listened for a minute or so, when lie saw, or at all events fancied that lie saw. a female clothed in white enter—whether by the door or by the window we are not informed—and quietly approach the foot of his bed. He was somewhat surprised, and not agreeably surprised, when the figure opened its pale lips and told him that three days from that very hour he should cease to live. In whatever manner this intimation, real or unreal, from the other world was conveyed to him, whether by sound of the voice or by any other mode of communication, one thing is cer- tain, that Lord Lyttelton regarded it as a reality, and a message from the world of spirits. The third night came, and everything had gone on as usual. The guests had sat down to dinner, played their rubbers of whist, and retired; but none of them had dared to rally the young Lord Lyttelton on the de- pression of spirits under which he laboured. Eleven o'clock came the party broke up, and went to their several rooms, wishing each other good night, and heartily desiring that the night were past and gone, so restless, anxious, and uncomfortable did they feel without exception. Twelve o'clock came, and Lord Lyttelton was sitting up in bed, having given his servant orders to mix him a dose of rhubarb, though apparently in the best of health. The dose was poured out, and he was just about to take it when he found that there was no teaspoon. A little out of patience with the valet for neglecting to have a spoon at hand, he ordered him to go and fetch one from the pantry at the foot of the stairs. The man was not absent from the room for more than a minute, or possibly a minute and a half, but when he returned ne found his master lying back at full length upon the bed speechless and motionless. No efforts to restore animation were of any avail, and no symptom of consciousness showed itself. His lordship was dead, having died on the third day, as the spectre had foretold.—Cassett's Greater London.

A WORD TCT^OUNG CRICKETERS.

._-_-__-----TARTAR HORSES.

A HEALTHY POLITICAL CONVENTION.

A VISIT TO ZOBEHR.

[No title]

j A POOR RULE, BUT UNIVERSAL.

WHY OLDER MEN SUCCEED BETTER.

-.-__----------HOW TO BETTER…

"GOING CIRCUIT" ON A TRICYCLE.

-------_---_--LAW OF HUSBAND…

AUSTRIA AND HUNGARY.¡

PURITAN NOMENCLATURE.

THE GOVERNOR'S SCARECROW.

THE VALUE OF A TRADE.

A KICK ON TAXES.

A KNOTTY PROBLEM. : J

[No title]

-'-,"", GARDENING FOR THE…

[No title]

BLUE BEARD.

LEGISLATIVE HUMOUR.

[No title]