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THE EARNINGS OF THE WORKING…

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THE EARNINGS OF THE WORKING CLASSES. But let us take a few specimens of the total earn- ings of classes of labourers. The domestic servants number about 2,355,000, of whom 309,000 are males and 2,04G,UOO females. Assume an average of £1: per annum each in money wages, and add £ 2.") per annum for board and lodging, the total is in money only, and £87.000,UOO including board, lodging, and perquisites. Domestic servants are em- ployed all the year round, and as a class they are exceedingly wdl off. In agriculture there are em- ployed as many as 2,346,000, and agricultural wages have risen considerably of late years, especially in counties contiguous to mineral and other centres of labour. Taking only 13s. per week for the whole number in money wages, and 2s. 6d. more in other advantages, such as an allotment of land, wood, some articles of food, and a cottage at lower rent than it is worth, and calculating only on 48 weeks' earning in the year, we have an annual amount of £31 a year in money --wages, or £37, including other advantages, giving a total of or £ 87,006,000 respectively. *In the textile fabrics there are about 1,000,000 of per- sons engaged, earning not less than 17s. a week, man arid woman alike. Assuming only forty-five weeks' labour for these, we have an annual income of .£38. oratorio: £ 38,000,0(10. There are no other per- quisites giren in this industry. Of common labourers there were in all about 700,000, and their wages may betakpn all round at 20s. per week, but for not more thar weeks in the year, or £ 40 a year, making a f. £ 28,000,000. Here we have in ihese four • la!-Hirers a total of about6,400,000 persons, together^—4 nion-y income of about food; WUring, &c., 2nrr- JL V are £ 6,000,000 more at w.)rk in the United Kingdom.•including nearly all the skilled industries. Probably some D.tHXM » men are thus employed, at wages averaging 20s. a week, but whose employment cannot be taken at more than forty-eight weeks in the year; and 1,000,000 women and chiHren, in the receipt of probably 10s. a week for forty-eight weeks, or S24 a year, giving a total of per annum. We have thus the total income of the labouring classes, amounting to £ 460.000,000 in money wages, or including board, lodging, and other perquisites. The number of earners thus estimated is about 1,400.000, which, to 25,000,00*3 persons belonging to the artisan and labouring class, give one earner for every two persons, or about two earners for every family of four and a half, the average being £ 84 per family in money wages only. or £ 98 including all other* allowances. Is this a sufficient income for the wants of oar working classes ? It must be noted that the average does not tep-^sent the real proportion in which the total income is divided. Here we see a common labourer earning, when at work, only 20s. a week. with half It dozen infants to support. There is a family whose head is incapacitated by illness from earning a farthing: and there, again, we find a number of families suffering from a strike or a turn-out. The best earners, moreover, among our working men are not always the most frugal; nor are the facilities for earning equal in every part of the kingdom, or in every district.—Professor Leoni Levi in the Leisure Hour. v

MORTALITY IN THE MERCHANT…

A GEORGIA SNAKE.

[No title]

PROPOSED AMENDMENTS IN THE…

GREAT LIBRARIES.

COLD AND HEAT NEAR THE POLES

------THE FISHERMAN IN INDIA.

THE SHIPBUILDING TRADE.

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CHINESE CHEAP LABOUR.

TRIMMING THE FEET OF ELEPHANTS.

—— IAN AID TO LONGEVITY.

THE NEW FRENCH SETTLEMENT.

SPORT IN THE CANADIAN NORTH-WEST.

[No title]

---------AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION…

MINISTERIAL RESPONSIBILITY…

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