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GOSSIP ON DRESS. -

-----HINTS FOR THE HOUSEHOLD.

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THE MERCHANT SHIPPING BILL.

--------.---AN ELECTRIC RAILWAY…

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THE FOLLIES AND FOIBLES OF…

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THE FOLLIES AND FOIBLES OF WOMEN. At the annual meeting of the National Women Suffrage Association of Massachusetts, recently held, Miss Nancy Willard Covell, speaking on The Reason Whv," said that she had been called upon to fill the unwelcome part of telling some of the follies and foibles of women. After making some sharp and facetious comments on the self-assumed greatness of man and his oppression of woman, Miss Covell spoke of the marked difference in compensation paid women for rendering the same service as men, and contended that the fact that woman was paid less was due to her lack of the power of the ballot, which was claimed to be worth fifty cents a day to any labouring man. Speaking of the different vocations of life, she contended that because woman had never opposed man in entering her sphere, iii becoiii- ing cooks, milliners, and dressmakers, she had outdone him in fairness. In speaking of the condi- tion of women of to-day, she said all that girls are taught is to be pretty and hide their faults and read love stories and crochet and make sponge cake, until some one asks them to marry. So the poor creature through fear they will miss their chances and tail to marry, begin very early to pinch themselves in some places and pad themselves in others. Sometimes they wear clothing enough to founder a ship, and again it is pronounced" lovely" to appear without any to speak of. With the injunction ringing in their ears, "whatever you do, be pretty," girls paint their lips and crock their eyebrows, and take opium to make their eyes soft and arsenic to make their complexions clear. It was an unfortunate day when Paul or some- body else said that the joy of woman was her hair. What nameless and untold tortures has this appendage of the human body not been sub- jected to? It has been filled with" rats" and "mice," heroically pulled out by the roots to make the forehead high, glued to the forehead, with extract of quince seed, and again brought over the eyes in tangled snares. It has been curled with overhot irons, and then allowed to float free far down the back ;i has been puffed and frizzed and powdered and curled and greased and banged, done up high or low, made longer or shorter, or dyed black or blonde, in strict accordance with the caprice of the fickle goddess of fashion. Does the Grecian bend require them to look likea dejected monkey, straightway they become limp in body, and chatter that they do not do it because it is fashion—it is perfectly natural for them. To-day they drag innumerable yards of dry goods through the streets, and to-morrow they appear in tie-backs so close that it is at the risk of their lives that they attempt to board a railroad train. Now the head is surmounted by a bonnet the size of a postage stamp, and then by one larger than an umbrella. Sometimes women are supposed to have hips, and then everybody, no matter how slender, grows broader than 'a donkey with paniers. Then hips are abolished and no trace of them can be discovered. If snakes and bugs become fash- ionable as ornaments, the snakes and bugs become "perfectly lovely," and the very girl who shrieked at the sight of a spider, simpers, they are just too lovely for anything." When iridescent beads become fashionable, one has only to wait a little, and every woman becomes a walking rainbow. Now cardinal is the rage, and then old gold; now mitts, and then twelve-buttoned gloves; now pleatings and then ruffles now hems, and then facings now waists are long and the ribs are laced down until they adhere to the liver, and then waists get shorter, and an oppor- tunity is given to breathe. In short, woman's enslavement by fashion has resolved life for her into an eternal game of wigwag," and until she escapes this bondage there is no mental life for her. All this, the speaker contended, is the outgrowth of the oppression of man in not giving woman an oppor- tunity to develop herself mentally, and in not giving her a social position equal to his own.

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THE YOUTH FROM THE COUNTRY.

CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERS

..Lc GENERAL GORDONS OPINION…

-__----------OUR IMPERIAL…

------------A STEAMER BURNT.

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,GREAT '3 BIVEB.3IGNS.

----EPITOME OF NEWS.

THE POULTRY YARD.

THE CULTIVATION OF THE SILK