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BARLEY PLANTING.

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BARLEY PLANTING. The quantity of seed per acre that is required to be sown needs careful consideration, says Land and Wafer. As with wheat and other crops, so is it with barley, and great difference of opinion exists as to heavier or lighter seedings. Thick planting we consider folly, inasmuch as 20 plants cannot form natural and healthy growth in a space suited only for a much less number, and therefore the quality of harvest would be materially injured. Again, the soil can only supply a certain amount of plant food, and to tax it too heavily can be attended with no good result. Allowing that all stems produce some grains, where there is a superabundance of stems the plants are poor and sickly, and produce thin, light grain fitted for nothing better than pig-food or hen-corn. To plant too thinly is equally a mistake. Unfortunately, too many insects love to feed upon thickly-scattered plants in preference to those thickly grown. It is obvious, then, that the medium line is the best one to take in barley planting, and when we mention that three and a half to four bushels per acre as being a fair quantity of seed, we leare it to the discreet tarmer to increase or diminish the quantity according to circumstances. We prefer depositing the seed with rl'W" alt1l°ugh our forefathers often preferred the -g-broadcast system. Drilling allows the land a ■ ? ear"1d from weeds, amidst which barley cannot if, ,e'"laPs hi former days farmers were not so mfU., them. The breaking of the crust q W' 1 e ']oe> too, is often advantageous to o. rWr> nl 0,r' P This grain does not re- WP ngf „A d°l)th of two inches is ample, and the levelling of the soil will not leave it much above an inch from the surface. The rows might be placed seven or eight inches apart, and plenty of room will then be left for a free current of air and sunshine between them, also 101 the free use of the hoe. After the drill one-horse harrows should be. used to cover the seed, and as soon as the surface is quite dry it should be rolled evenly with a light roller. Great care is needed that none of the processes of working the soil should be carried on when the soil is wet, or either stubborn clods or a set surface of the consistency of a rock will be the result, and under such circumstances it is hopeless to expect a crop of barley.

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