Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

13 articles on this Page

-------l-íûncrn ^ vvcKonbrat.…

News
Cite
Share

l-íûncrn vvcKonbrat. j <V»m reV, to st-fte that wo ar-t r.t all tur. 1 Identify „i3c' es *iO. tun- i orr^s,s opinions..] | The fact that the two first Drawing Rooms of the season have been held by the Princess of Wales on behalf of her Majesty reminds us that the local in- convenient caused by the Jent of twelve months ago, has not yet disappeared. For many years past the Levees have been presided over by the Prince of Wales but whenever the Queen's health has per- mitted, her Majesty has held the Drawing Rooms in person. In either case the presentation to the Prince or Princess of Wales is regarded as equivalent to presentations to the Sovereign; indeed, this is always expressly stipulated in the official notices which appear in the London Gazette. A Drawing Room, at which ladies alone are received, is held by the Queen or the Princess of Wales, invariably at Buckingham Palace, her Majesty's former residence in London; the Heir Apparent holds the Levees at the Palace of St. Javjies's, not far off. What is known as a Court is presided over only by the Sovereign herself, for the reception of both ladies and gentlemen, and it. is the rule for this to take place at Buckingham Palace. A vi ry good idea of the great variety of life in London is furnished on a fine spring afternoon, when < & D 'awing Room or a Levee is being held. jPc* i :I\Ç, thèaftyn of Friday, the 14th inst., _}Ice8s of Whiles held a Drawing Room at Buckingham Palace, rfcct in its way. No damp ground, a pleasant br.. and bright sunshine-such were che condition-s a^veeable hour in the Royal park of St. James's, where the rees and shrubs were ready to burst forth in early and premature vegeta- tion. A great crowd assembled in the hope of seeing the Princess as her Royal Highness was driven from Marlborough House to the palace, and then, of course, there was the long line of ladies in their open carriages who had come to pay their respects to the Queen's representative. And it was a respectable orderly multitude, the component parts of which could obviously spend an afternoon thus with- out feeling that they were making a sacrifice of time, which, to a large proportion of Londoners, means money. All this time there was no diminution of traffic in the great arteries of the capital, no lessening of the crowds ever pouring across the bridges, travel- ling in the underground railways, or making thoir way in steamboats up and down the rapid tide of the Thames. The absence of the Prime Minister from his place in the House of Commons for a week through ill- ness so early in the session has, as was inevitable, given rise to much political speculation in con- templating eventualities. One night last week there were the wildest rumours in the lobby. Not only was Mr. Gladstone unable to be present but the questions addressed to two other Cabinet Ministers—Mr. Chamberlain and Sir Charles Dilke—had to be answered by the Parliamentary secretaries of their departments, because of the absence of the chiefs. It was known that Sir Charles Dilke had had an interview with Mr. Gladstone the same afternoon, ill as the Premier was. Therefore the lobby gossips put this and that together. Three Cabinet Ministers away from their posts; the Premier not at a council held two days previously in his own house; Mr. Chamberlain had suddenly left London for Birmingham- what could it all mean but a break-up ? It does not take much to magnify a trifling lobby rumour into a monstrous canard; and such was the case on the present occa- sion. At the same time, there is little doubt that Mr. Gladstone, who has now lived in the world three-quarters of a century, is weary of official life, and longs for rest. No one would be surprised at his retirement from a harassing and thankless post, which is held under conditions widely different from those of fifty or even twenty years ago. The descriptions ot the latest engagements which Generals Sir Gerald Graham and Sir Redvers Buller have had with the Arabs amply testify to the bravery and skill of these gallant foes. As a race of men they seem immensely superior to the Egyptians, from whose rule they have revolted, and of whose behaviour at Tel-el-Kebir we have had graphic descriptions from Lord Wolseley. It 11 ppears in- evitable that Great Britain, with her vast-spreading empire, and her complicated interests all over the globe, shall be constantly inflicting chastisement on some barbarian antagonist. Within five years we have been at war with the Zulus, the Afghans, the Boers, the rebel Egyptians, and the Soudanese Arabs. That gives an average of a little war once in every twelve months. Endless are the applied results of charity and bene- volence in a giant community like that of London. An hour spent at the annual meeting of the Tempo- rary Home for Lost and Starvirt Dogs, which was held in Jermyn-street one day last week, would have amply illustrated this. The report stated that last year 14,687 dogs were received into the institution, of which 1985 had been restored to their owners, while 2188 were placed in new homes. A question was asked as to what became of the remainder, an undisposed-of balance of more than ten thousand vagrants. It was explained that these, being mongrels for the greater part, such as no one would receive into a house, had to be destroyed. The death was instantaneous and painless. Should this rate of destruction be continued many years, the ranks of the prowling dogs of London will in course of time become perceptibly thinned. An institution similar to the Dogs' Home would be much appreciated in Constantinople. Thousands of these wretches scour the streets of that capital at night, making the most hideous noises whilst in search of food. Baroness Burdett-Coutts had been announced to preside at this meeting, but a letter was read from her ladyship, in which she explained that by the advice of Sir William Jenner she kept to her house, a severe cold having prevented her from fulfilling this as well as other engagements. We have been so accustomed year after year to hear and read of the munificence of this wealthy lady and of the interest which she takes in all good works, that Time has imper- ceptibly crept upon her, and many will be sur- prised to hear that in another month she will have completed her seventieth year. The vast amount of good which she has endeavoured to effect in the cause of a long and useful life it would be impossible to estimate in anything like a cursory glance at her benefactions. But all who know anything of the benevolence of the Baroness Burdett-Coutts will sincerely hope that her indisposi- tion is but temporary, and that she may be spared many days for the prosecution of those deeds of charity in which she has so long delighted. The genial spring weather has been grateful enough to those octogenarians who were so tried by the bitter winds of this time twelve months. It makes all the difference when they are enabled to move about in the soft south wind, and in the brilliant sunshine which has been tenderly compared to the meeting of heaven and earth. Lord Shaftes- bury has been as active as ever, and no one, to listen to the metallic ring in his voice, would take the veteran philanthropist to be 82 years of age. That was a happy thought of Lord Mayor Fowler to give a dinner in the noble earl's honour at the Man- sion House. For half a century has Lord Shaftesbury been pleading the cause of the classed who cannot "plead for themselves, and while many a.ve criticised his mode of procedure, there are none to deny the earnestness and enthusiasm which have always been thrown into the work. The scene at the Royal ictoria Coffee Palace in the Waterloo-road on Saturday evening, when Weston the pedestrian completed his mammoth walk of SOOt) miles was one of much enthusiasm, and will not soon be forgotten by those who witnessed it. When the task was finished, a public meeting was held, over which Dr. Norman Kerr presided. Speeches were delivered by Dr. B. W. Richardson, Canon Duckworth, and others who have taken an interest in this wonderful test of the values of an application of temperance principles to a walk which could it have been straight across the Atlantic, would have taken Weston far beyond the ranges of the Rocky Mountains.

DRAWING-ROOM AT BUCKINGHAM…

A SINGULAR EXPERIENCE.

WIFE MURDER IN IRELAND.

THE NAVY ESTIMATES.

CONCLUSION OF WESTON'S 5000…

————.————————— 'iV)+{rII.…

A MOURNFUL TRAGEDY.

THE DEFEAT OF OSMAN DIGNA.

.....--.----- ---------------CAPTURE…

Advertising

THE HANGMAN AND HIS DUTIES.…

-----ZOBEHR ON THE SOUDAN.…