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-=:=::=- U THE JOURNAL" CENTENARY. INTERESTING COMMEMORATIVE DINNER. The attainment of its centenary by the JOUBKAL on Marcn ord was commemorated on Friday evening last by a U.unei, g-ven by the proprietor, at the Ivy Bush Royal iivvel ICarmarthen. The guests in- cluaed the staii at the head office, some of the senior correspondents from the various districts served by the paper, and we contributors to the centenary numoer of the paper. Altogether there were about 50 present. air James Drummond, Bart., C.B. (Lord Lieutenant of Carmarthenshire), presided, and he was supported by the Mayor of Carmarthen (Alderman waiter Lloyd), and others. As a social re-union of those who have been for many years concerned in the production of tne paper. «i carrying on of the large printing business connected with it it was a resounding success, and served to cement' and renew the enthusiasm and fidelity which in vears past have helped to bring fhe JOURNAL to its present flourishing condition. The after-dinner sneechea alone—an intellectual treat—were more than sufficient to guarantee a delightful gathering, whue the e^ellent dinner supplied by Host D. E Wd- liams left nothing to be aesired. The biU of fare was slfr out on an artisttcally-printed menu• nished with quotations appropriate to the occasion such as— "And still flourish he, a hale green tree. When a hundred years are gone. "I will be correspondent to command, '-Though an ,n Jl Khou'd write, still 'tis devils must print, eto. copy of the card w tfs handed round and 11 the iruests This, with a book containing wtereat- of the etc was forwarded by the rw6\. Evre Evans to the National Library of Wales, where they will be deposited for reference in years to come. The menu in detail was as follows:- SouPS. Oxtail. Spring. FISH. Filleted Soles. Holiandaise Sauoe. ENTKEES. S, Kidne,s iL la Ivy Bush." Lobster Pattit.\>. REMOVED. Roast Lamb. Mint Sauce. Sirloin Beef. Yorksnire Pudding. Boiled Turkey "Àux Truiles." Celery Sauce. Ox Tongues. Roast Spring Chick-ens and Sausagee. K-HTR# VESTS. Trifle. Cabioot Puüciiug. Crea.med. Fruit Tart. Custards, LuBtaru jnai.an Cream. CHEESE. LJSSAERL'. Pines. Bananas. Oranges. Preserved Fruit. ^ppieii. J? raits, etc. H, LO ,nB eujojment ot th eeveinng MUCH WAS .O OY AIE^RS. by 4 v\ AID, JLOWIS cnles, H. COIUY O.x- .UUM XI. RWJVW, :id inr;r. p—mg plano 1Ü piano in no 06ing the toast of the ■'King the Koyal js'awily," staUxi^utf. he j# to tne ->allOUt1(.<^faU8<0 tailing nun, he trusted then next y<-ar nie.Viure of re- tliey would U10mbers ot the Royal family* (renewed » a peacemaker botn at home and abroad (ciaeexa). In .^uitung tho toast of Unionist'candidate Sir allowed to enjoy the entertauirnexit ui pe^d' from the danger and misery, ot being^cauea to disturb hift own digestive eqUihoiuim. an quiet pleasure by making a speech (Iamghter). Un- fortunately ne h^d put his trust ill ed.torB, who easily forgot ail about compacts-that is QOt business training Uaughtor). lne fault Srcly Mr. Out*, ''i! knowledge "to^givo th* U,.iai^ nn'd l»«n pre-reoled S i =tn» oIgMU.ordi„ar, and mysterrou, com- pletions from keeping th«:r »»«?«' £ ,\«x«»nt So he had been pressed into the brea^n. The toast of the centenary was so ootnprehens >e „ ;*■ (Kfi the wide period of a long tipaii o ^rs, as to present considerable who lived in the immediate neighbourhood of the leer" operations and even much more trying for one like himseif, who was a comparative "Jjj0* £ } Z r midst. Perhaps that was the very ^a^n wby the task had fallen to his lot (kuighter). A UtUe information, upon a subject you ore nected to extol, is sometimes an undoubted and CSS advantage ^ughter). 7™ £ £ know too much. You could aiso speak without bia« and prejudice (renewed laughter). Onething was certain and unconvertible. The paper had under nracticallv the same ffigis for owr «• century of time—a long neriod in the history of human life. Many hurdles had been successfully negotiated, and numerous vicissitudes pae*<j< Early more frequent than honoured old age of newspapers. But if, after a constant struggle for existence against the competition of younger maL, a journal survives, you commemorate birth, but you congratulate it upon a contiuous and vigorous existence. That is the difference .we4iJ, paper and the isolated individuals who de^ tm». Tho centenarian, even if he retain the use of h» Ls but a pitiful and sorry object, and it is but a hollow mockery to offer him health, long continued usefulness. Wo can only refer to a weU- spent and useful past. But a newspaper that sur- vives grows with years in strength, power, fulness Its vitality is stronger, its mfluerun> For the majority of us, I fear, that when a hundred vears have rolled by fropi the time of our birthjre shall be unrecognisable—(lanurfiter)—if, ind^' there be any left, to know us (renewed Most of us wil lhave gone to a bettor land where papers, editors, and rews mongere do not least, let us hope so (laughter). However, as to thai, may the JOURNAL still bo m existence to edunate the pwpfe, circulate the news, and enjoy tb« tation it gained in the first, century, when another has passed by (hear, hear). He felt certain it would last oat many centuries—as it wel! deserved, having stood suoh a period of residence m Carmarthen (langhter); evidently ram did not kUl paptr-^ To- wards the end of its first hundred years of pfenu^ ous run he (Mr. Oremlyn) was under a heavy debt of obligation to the paper—if indeed obligation was the correct word. They had reported manyothis recent speeches. That in itoelf ^uld not be a kind- ness (laughter). But they did more. They re\i>ed l.hem. They improved them out of recognition, and I after a careful perusal of these efforts he came to j the conclusion that hA was quite a oaoabio speaker and that tho JOURNAL was a wry Inghclass and i tl-wful paper (laughter). As a race politwuuis and I others owe a great deal more to the, press than is often acknowledged (anplaiiso). ^or himself he owed evervthing, tl>e only people who had cause to complain being his friendly. Liberal oppooont^ who were, however, far to genial andI srood-natured u> take advantage of the confession. But all would, he felt certain, without any reference to party or creed, agree that the paper was. taking it for ail in all. a model and standard of what a well-conducted British paper should be (applau^. It vv;,s consutt^T with pleasure and advantage. Bven Mich inr-guided people as his friend. Mr. W'heido*-daughter and applatl.-c-)-sought data, information, and inspiration from its columns. He had been, creditably inform.Hl that it was the source of much of his power and authority in the town-an authority he. certainly verv properlv enjoyed, and that even in his spar^ moments of relaxation when he charmed them with his fund of anecdote tiiat-lbe it said quietly)-some of his wit, and many of his jokes, ww culled from the good old JOTTHNAL. True some jealous, dry, humourless persons, unkindly said, probably tlie% belonged to other rival orguns-tihat .thl" jokes were a hundred years old (Unughter). Well he Io\ed ihe antique (renewed laughter). In celebrating as we do its centenary, they regarded with sausfartion its con- tinued spirit of independence. That WM why Mr. Wheldon took it (laughter). There is no sign of senile dW. No Wmng on pn^. or -rolling in ,ts character. Ifc was consult-ecl and read by all kinds and conditions of men—Church and < bapei, Torv and Libeml, and if the latter pany only w«>nl it—for another liumlred vearo -there WHS hope for them (loud laughter). It had been cymcally said that an independent paper wn»> that c<>uld not be depended upon (laughte-rt. Whether that were generally true he did nor. l:now. It p-rtamb did not apply to this paper (hear. heAr}. t wa", courageous, its language firm vet poi V. it nhraseology neat, its English pure, and beautiful. Iind as for the Welsh, TO be found w.M-k by wok iu the special <-ohu»n^-<elywch. oKwcnS-welK it worthy "of Gorouwy Owen (loud upplaubfM. He Mr. t-rernJVn) knew, for i.e regularly wutnmitw* to and wa« indeed mairdy responsible for uiat part ofth*- (lauhter). Th«y Wd a ^'d «Val M -tristocracv" in these times. In the upper ten of '<ournalism"their pa^r iveW M> un^.r^m ihear hear). If every nobihty »oith> name there would be kss dis-AtL-sf^uon with tha> Whatever will be abohdied ,n the n< xt hundred years no one pr^ent, desin-d th, ^Um.nat.on violent, or other uietB^ot oM,lntv ^er, exist, (amAause). Ylv only wished they ha<l more like it in the North (h<*r hear^. It was^a hi'/b-class iournal in mor« thun od«> ealous of the ouality of literatum mk) nrw, con- t-iinerl therein that its prK««. though v ncr.My mVXrate were verv hi eh when any mere r*irt> Ws vz < in the word:/of the song, on, « in in quality, but had reduced to a einglo penny the priee of a weekly issue. he did not propose that night to follow its course throughout its long career. an the great strides and progress of our race, all the inventions of steam and electricity, which had re- volutionised society, took place contemporaneously with its life. This aspect, together with an archiaao- logical research into its early records, might well be left to others. For two reasons he would not intrude. In the first place he did not know any- thing about archaeology—(laughter)—and the rev. gentleman who was to follow knew everything about it. He would content himself with asseverating that the JOUITNAL had followed the course and history of these frequent discoveries, had kept itself abreast of the times. It was a credit to everyone connected with it. It was never more useful, or more advan- tageously controlled, than to-day. He asked them to drink its health, and to join with him in the sincere wish that it might go on flourishing, perform- ing ita duty and offices, maintaining its reputation and high character in the times that are yet to come as it had always done in tho years that are now past (loud and prolonged applause). The toast was drunk with enthusiasm. Rev. George Eyre Evans, who responded to the toast, said that he was there to say a word or so about the JOLíRAL in responding to the toast, and possibly to give them a few items from the first year's issue of ihe JOURNAL. During the past after- noon he had been favoured by the kindness of Mr. Giles with a view of some of the numbers issued during the first year of the JODBNAL'S existence. Up to that time they had not been able to get hold of the first number of the paper, but, through the kindness of an unknown friend, they had got hold of the last four numbers of the first year. In these they were taken a long way back in the century, and there he would like to lay a laurel wreath on the memory of his old friend Mr. William Waters. A fortnight before he passed away to better service, the speaker had had a chat with him, when he had said that he had seen John Daniels, the printer of the JOURNAL, and he said that he felt certain that some day, someone would be found who would be able to tell them something from the first year of the JOURNAL. This John Daniel must have been a humorous, delightful man to deal with. As an old prees-man himself, he obeyed the commands of his editor, and he thought there was no man in his employ who did not obey John Daniel when be spoke. Two years afterwards it passed into the hands of Mr. Phillips, who at that time was organist at St. Peter's. He was a man who carried on the Ea'Ln traditions of the paper. Dealing with the com- ments which appeared in these days, the speaker said that the JOURNAL had so far escaped an action for libed, as far as he knew, but the editor of the contemporary paper was dapped into gaol in the first year of nis office. When poor old Joseph Palmer wrote an article attacking the Town Council he was clapped into the Carmarthen Gaol within a few hours, and there he remained for some time. He went in under a shadow, but came out to the singing of St. Peter's bells, for it was found that what he had written was absolutely and perfectly true, for the present Council's predecessors in the "gilded chamber" were not above selling for a few pence apiece of land, which brought in a. large yearly income to those who bought it. but the present Coun- cil was quite beyond that. They did not spend five guineas on a new hat for the town crier, nor went out of their way to enrich their friends at the ex- pense of the ratepayers. Daniels wielded a most facile pen, and wrote the finest advertisements ever seen. Mr. Evans then went on to give some extracts from the earlier numbers of the paper, and caused great amusement by his numerous comments on the quaint stylo of those days. He could fancy Sir James' grandfather, a staunch representative of the County Borough in Parliament, with silver-rimmed eye-glass, and white shirt ruffles, a typical oounty gentleman, as all the Hamlyn-Williams' -were, reading the JOURNAL, and chuckling over the very bits which he (Mr. Evans) was quoting to them. How did the JOURNAL look in those days. and what was given for sevenpence? They got more to-day for a penny than they did then for 7d- The paper of those days was a very high-class one, and told you all about the doings of the Cor- poration. Just imagine the Town Council of these days on going out of office writing to the paper and saying that there was just 4d. in the Exchequer, and that those who followed them were fools and asses, they would be put into gaol. but that wan what happened a hundred years ago. In those days tho paper was not printed by linotype; it was done by good, honest comping work, and there was no linotype ever made that could come up to that. Coming down the stream of time, his earliest niemory of the JOURNAL was of seeing all the compositors sta-nding in Guildhall-square in their aprons, and cheering at seeing on the cncket-scoi-^ng board, tho news of the defeat of the Conservative candidate. He got a little higher than some of their friends (laughter), but he climbed up to the top a.t. last. On this occasion the windows were filled with ladies in red and white shawls. He now came to another of Mr. Giles' predecessors, and here he. was bound to lay a wreath on the memory of honest Tobit Evans, for he was that. The speaker was sitting with him in his library in his last days, and had heard from him much of what he had done in his earliest years, and how ho had struggled to make journalism a. respectable thing in Carmarthen-. Times had changed, and it was to honest Quaker Evans that, they owed a great deal of the power of the paper to-day (applause). He had told the speaker a great deal about the earlier history of the paper, things that would perhaps be told in the bi-centenary number (laughter). They still had in their midst his loved friend, Col. Davies-Evans, of Highrnead, and it was only right that fie should bo represented that night by his son, but he was present in spirit. Ho had done yeoman service, and would meet his reward, for It was he who re-established the JOUR- NAL in their midst (applause). He was speaking with the freedom which he had been endowed when ho said that it was to CoL Davies-Evans that they owed a great deal of what they saw in the JOURNAL to-day (applause). With regard to tho paper itself. they all had a great responsibility on their shoulders as regarded its production, from the humblest office- boy to the editor; they had to ü that the news they gave was true, and was such as would not bring the blush to the cheek of any young girl who read it, and that what they got hi the paper would go to make the Empire in the very best sense possible (applause). He was jealous, as were all his comrades, of the prestige of the daily and weekly press of the country, and they wero determined to see that journalism would not suffer at their hands (applause). It was interesting to note that that evening they were linking up that gathering with the bi-centenary of the paper in no small way. That afternoon he had got the signatures of every mem- ber of the staff on the pay-book, while that evening he had procured on the menu card tho autographs of all present. These would go into the store-house of the National Library of Wales at Aberystwyth, and anyone who wished could see them a hundred years hence. One of the functions of the. National Library was to preserve everything connected with that Wales of which they were all so proud. Mr. Cremlyn had alluded to antiquarians and their old-fashioned ideas of raking up the things of the past, bur they all had a duty to perform, and lie did not know what tho centenary number of the JOURNAL would have been if it had not been for the "raking up" by Mr. Barker of his grandfather's diary for his interesting article, and of Mr. H. M. Thomas' de- lightful contribution. They might be old-fashioned antiquarians, but they liked to record things (laugh- ter), so that there was place of them in a gathering of that kind. It was a matter of archaeology and a matter of importance for them to know how John Daniel ran his paper. The speaker could only claim to be one who lived in a little town not unknown in Cardiff, and called "Aberystwyth (laughter), who looked alwut him, if they liked, in old registers and this of the past, and who simply came there that night to tell them what little he could, and to link up what appeared in the centenary number and carry it on as far as he could. When they remembered that there was only one paper in Wales older than the .JOURNAL, what a power a. hundred years must have been in its hands. It was read in the county homes and in tho workingmen's houses and they paid a penny for a paper which, represented true journalism, and made for all that was ri)..dn. and proper, and was in the forefront of all that was best in Wales (applause). Mr. W. J. Waterhouse, in proposing the toast, of "The Staff and Correspondentb, said that that was by no means an ordinary dinner. it was Hot an ordi- nary occasion, but one that would be hisiorie in the annals of Carmarthen, because it was not a frequent occurrence for a newspaper to celebrate its centenary. He could recall the time when he had tuner seen an editor (laughter). He had seeu bishops and princes of the blood royal, but he had never s-een an editor. Art editor to him then was something mysterious, and of almost, irresistible force. which by means of prln- t<-rs' ink was ablo to form pubiie opinion. His con- diuon was of uncontrollable power (laughter). He had observed that the editor of the .)OUUNAL, with characteristic modesty, did not allow his portrait to appear in the centenary number of that periodical. It would have been a matter of much gratification to his innumerable well-wishers. However, if they did not see a photograph of the editor they had the pleasure of seeing that of Mr Thomas Davies, who had been engaged at the ofliee for 42 years. They also saw the portrait, of Mr. Joseph Evans, who had put in a stretch of 40 years, and they also saw that of Mr. Daniel Jones, v. ho hod been "11- gaged there for 38 years (applause). It must he eonceded that terms of life serviw such as those were not only highly honourable to the if concerned, hut. an unimpeachable nerfiiieute of character to the people who employed thejn (hear, hear). With regard to the staff generally lie would only av this: When the gas-engine playWI pranks— he was not now allnding to Mr. Giles (laughter) — when the s'as-engine played some priniks and de- veloped eccentricities which calculated to dis- turb tho equitable production of the .lon'.XAF.. the staff had to set to, and doctoral then- patienr.. Men like that were not only.men of their heads, but men of their hands. It was not amiss to say that, the cor- respondents constituted a group which no newspaper in the Principality need be ashamed of. They were scattered over an area, which of itself was an index to the far-reaching influence of the JOURNAL, and to the interest with which its columns were perused. He hoped to be spared to see that influenoe extended and the JOURNAL permanently enlarged. He hoped to see discussed in ite columns topics on foreign and imperial policies. The JOURNAL was a great instru- ment, which was in temperate and competent hands, to further a policy of wide knowledge and compre- hensive significance. The Welshman's patriotism was a very strong and living thing, but it was 60 fervid that there was some danger of it degenerating into the glorification of the parish pump. It should be the work of an editor of such a paper as this to help the Welshman by giving him accurate in- formation and trustworthy news to enable him to bear his part with dignity in the responsibilities of Empire (applause). The toast having been enthusiastically received, Mr. Lewis Giles, editor and manager of the JOUR- AL rose to respond. He observed that ho had spent a large portion of life in absorbing the flowing perkxte oi oo'mty councillors and district councillors, and in reproducing them in a more or less imperfect black and white, so that the habit of living upon the oratory of others had robbed him of the healthy use of the little with which he had been born. After the able speeches they had heard that night he felt particularly forlorn, and might well say in the words of Sir W. S. Gilbert, "I cannot rise to the jn- tellectual pressure of the conversation" (laughter). He thanked the proprietors of the JOURNAL for their very kind hospitality to the staff and correspondents that evening. Even if the dinner served no other good purpose it went to show the staff and corres- pondents that the proprietors held them in high esteem. The staff were there year after year, at- tending as Mr. Waterhouse had said, to the gas- engine occasionally, and trying to maintain what Mr. Cremlyn described as an independent. high-class paper. The correspondents were distributed over tho three oounties of Carmarthen, Cardigan, and Pem- broke, and ho thought it was a splendid thing to collect them together under such congenial and pleasant conditions as existed that evening. The staff he thought were the best lot. of men that oould be found in any similar printing office in South Wales (applause). Ho had never met the correspondents collectively before, but he knew their worth individually, and be was proud to meet them together that night. They were not trained jour- nalisis; they were men who had heavy responsi- bilitiee of their own, and what they did for the JOURNAL was done during their leisure time, and often at great sacrifice, and surprisingly well done. He would like to refer especially to one of them— Mr. John Lloyd, of Lampeter—who was one of the oldest, if not the oldest, and one of tho most es- teemed of the JOURNAL'S staff of correspondents (hear, hear). He was sorry to say that Mr. Lloyd was that day in very indifferent health and was in consequence not able to join them at the convivial board. Referring to the JOURNAL, the speaker said it was advancing by leaps and bound. This was largely due to the very substantial work and aoaod foundation laid by Col. Davies-Evans in days past (applause)—thanks more perhaps to Col. Davies- Evans than to any others of the succession of able men who had from time to time controlled the in- terests of the concern (hear, hear). The paper WAS still making great progress. Its circulation was rising steadily and constantly. During the last six or seven years it had been almost doubled (applause). During the last two years it had inoreased by over a. thousand a week (cheers). That was a great deal for a weekly paper to accomplish, and a great deal of the credit of that was due to the fidelity of and interest taken in the paper by their correspondents. He was not going to be satisfied, however, until the figures had boen raised by two or three thousand more, and perhaps not then (laughter). There was every hope of this being done. A splendid founda- tion had been laid by Col. Davies-Evans. and also by do late Mr. Pughe Davies, Mr. Daniel Watkins, a.nd others, and if the correspondents put their shoulders to the wheel the JOURNAL would soon rank as the largest and most influential county weekly in Wales (applause). Mr. Thomas Daviea (overseor), in aloso responding, said that ho had had a. proud connection of 42 years' service with the staff, and he was glad to say that HE and the other two veterans were in the pink OF condition (laughtor and applause). In the aggregate they had put in a service of 120 years, and judging from outward appearance, he ventured to say that they oould do another 120 (hear, hear, and laughter). His connection of 42 years with the JOURNAL meant a great deal; it was a lifetime (cheers). Had he served under the Government he would have retired on a pension long ago (laughter). It was his mis- fortune that he d d not get engaged under both (renewed lanughter). Tho staff might be a some- what small one, but it could not bo beaten. Tho gas engino might break down, but the men did not (lanughter). The stamina was good. Referring to wie centenary number, Mr; DAVIES said that all had worked exceedingly hard that wook. Had not the GENERAL election immediately preceded it.. and there was CONSEQUENT increase in the volume of work, they would have done better. He thanked them one and all for so oordially drinking the health of the staff and correspondents (applause) Mr. John Bowen, who also responded, said that he came thero that night to show the great respect which ho had for the JOURNAL, and it gave him great pleasure to be amongst them to celebrate the centenary of suoh a widely circulated paper as that. He had been corresponding for it for a. long time, and had had a strong connection with the editors, and was sorry to say "that one had lately paAged away. They were all good men, and did excellent work. Although a Conservative paper, the JOURNAL was more Liberal in many respects than many of the papers which professed to be Liberal, because it published none relating to other parties, which other papers did not do. The Welsh columns alone repaid the reader for what he had give8 for the paper. Farmers in the district of Newcastlo-Emlyn for instance, relied on what appeared in the JOURNAL is being true. He bad done his beet in the past for the snooesa of the JOURNAL, and would do it in the future. He wished the paper, editor, and staff Ion tile and prosperity. Mr. Bowen concluded with a few felicitous remarks in the vernacular. The Ber. D. 8. Davies, Cilrhedyn, in wishing tho paper all soooefiS in the future, said that he had the honour of being connected with it for some time. He had also been editor of tho Welsh columns of the paper. He hoped that the press and pulpit would go on together, because they wero a great power for good. Mr. Davies concluded by reciting the following impromptu LINOS, which were composed for tho occasion:— Warm greeting to tho JOUKNAL. In the schedule of truth enrolled; You took so young and flourishing Though Hundred Years Old I The cream of literature. Enlightens every page; And like tho love of Shakespeare Gets younger in old age. Among thy benefactors, In the coveted "ladder of fame"; We find our noble Chairman, Great glory crowns his name. With many other "gianHs," Who wield most fluent pens, And keep the JOURNAL rolling, "Old CambriaV' richest gems. The directors and shareholders Are worth their weight in gold. The best and highest principles Invariably they uphold. The editor M a genius— In his "editorial chair"; HO wears dear "'Eitir's" mantle Whose talents are so rare. Hawddamor i "Myrddinfab," Yr henaf yn y gwaith; fyw nior hen a'r JOURNAL A'i wyneb Hon heb graith. Er fod y tall belonau Bron deifio barf oi en; Amddiffyn wlla yr Eglwys Yn gadarn, gyda gwen. H ir oes newyddiadur, Oleua Gymru lan; A phur lenyddiaeth odiaeth Barddoniaeth fyw a ohan. O waeiod calon gynh<*s, Ar hon ei "chanfed flwydd," "Three cheers" rhoddwn iddi- (wir deilwng yw ei swydd. Cilrhedyn. SAWLLIAX. The Rev. Griflith Thomas, in proposing the toa-.l. of the and Trado of Carmarthen, expressed .urpriso that that toast had been put in the hands of a pardon (laughter). He supposed that the fact that he had lived for seven years in Carmarthen entitled h'im to propose ir, as it, was said that a. mall who had boen a curate in the same, place for £ >even years had earned hi* parish (laughter). The toast which he was going to propose was in one sense more importa.nt than that of the centenary of the JOURNAL, because a hundred years ago Car- marthen could boa.t. of being 2000 years old, and it wa$really a grandmother when tho JOURNAL was born (laughter). Again, they could not divest The town of its ecclesiastical associations, which went back to the Celtic period. When they went back, they found that. there was a Celtic Church in Car- marthen about 1400 or 150 years ago, long before there was a St. Peter's Church. or the Priory of St. John the Evangelist, which supplied the place of the old Cfxltic Church. The town had passed through tho Druidic.al, Roman, Celtic, and Norman periods, until they got. it, as it, was at the present day. The town was one of the most historical town.- in Wales. When lv left- Cardiff to come and live there, someon • had toM him that ho W8<: Toing to an outlandish old-fashioned place, but he had said that Carmarthen was as big it now when Cardiff was only a little village, so that he was much prouder of having lived there. Although he was not a t. Peter's boy his grandfather hail lived within siv miles of the town, and the so^aker had spent a. great deal of his time there. The Griffith Thomas who sncc<>eded him would be a St. Peter's bov (cheers). It had |>eer! said that the staple trade of Carmarthen was fishing (applaiuso ami laughter). Their fishermen did their fishing in exactly the same kind of coracle as was used 2,000 years ago, and few towns could show such a continuity as could the ancient Borough. It was a remarkable thing that a hundred years ago thero were two fairs in Carmarthen, one on Wednes- days and the 4dthlJ!" on Saturdays, and every other day, exoept Sunday, was a fish market. That was before water-bailiffs came into existence—(laughter)— and there were a great many more ilsh in the Towy than there wero to-day (lanughter). They could not now hold a fish market every day of the week with the amount of fkh oaught in the coracles. So im- portant was that market that they had to get a Royal Charter to hold it. It would be interesting to have a history of tho defunot trades in Carmarthen. He had read in the JOURNAL that at one time the coopers lived in Red-street, and the hatters in Blue- stroet, and it was from their political views that tho streets got their names. Both parties met in the Square on one oocaaion and there was a great fight. At the present day one cooper lived in Blue-street, but he doubted whether there was a single hatter in Red-street. In those days politics were very much more virulent than in these days. thouerh thev wore nowadays sometimes very virulent, (laughter and applause). They had heard a great deal about the BI-centenary of the JOURNAL, but. he doubted whether anyone who lived in those days. and looked ajf. the defunct, trades in the Borough would find a single printer (laughter and "No"). They would be able to get to Germany—where everything was made now-in about a quarter of an hour, and the JOUR- TTAL would be printed there and bRou?ht to Carmar- then, and sold at a far cheaper rate than they were able to sell it at present (laughter and no"). Well, perhaps they would get some change which would prevent that cata5t>-onhe (lau«rhter). As he had heard from SIR James Drum- mond. thev were all looking- forward to the OOSRibility of a VISIT from His MAJESTY the King, or some member of the Royal FamDy, to the National Eisteddfod next year. If anyone could bring about this O; effect, it was the trentleman who was their CHAIRMAN that evening (applause). He proposed that Sir JAMES He asked to do Trs utmost to make the National Eisteddfod of 1911 such an historic event in the HIQFORV of the town, that all other eisteddfedau BEFORE it would ,na1" nto insignificance (apptause). HE nlso hoped that his friend, Mr. Waterhou«». and the gentleman, WHO hoped would be the MEMBER "ç T'MENT for the Borough—Lord TIVERTON—WNNM do all thev could to make the town. ann pvrv+T1Q' CONNECTED with it. all that averv St. Peter's bov could wish. "0 t}H!.t. in fI'1other 100 or 1000 VPR thp TOWN would hp fr Greater than it was to-dav. so that even Germany would not destroy it (ar>r>laus»). Mr. P. J. Wheldon, in responding to the toast, thanked them for the way in which they had drunk it. for the very good reason that the town deserved all their good wishes. It contained the descendants of some of the most ancient races in Great Britain. Ho entered with all hia heart and soul into tho con- gratulations with the editor and staff, which had done such good work for so many years (applause). Their town had A right to be put side by side with all that glorified and elevated, and that which made for its culture and literature was the JOURNAL (ap- plause). The town of Carmarthen had a literary fame which was equal to that of any other. No towns had produced such books or such a number of books, and there was not beter printer in tho ingdom than John lloss (applause). With regard to the prosperity of the town, there was a tradition that it woul,d, one day be totany destroyed. That prophecy was fallacious and mythological in the ut- most degree, for nature had placed Carmarthen in the centre of three oountiee, which position would ever make it the oentro of industry and commerce' of those oounties. Again, the town had produced many great men, and it was a fact that none did more successfully than those who were born there, or had lived there for some time. He believeu" that Carmarthen people wero never more alive to the real welfare and dignity of the town than at the present time. He noticed an improvement even during the last 12 months. During the time he had been in the town he had helped to do a great deal for the public buildings, and they had now renowed their youth like the eagle, and presented a creditable and handsome appearance. They had a. good name in business, and as long as they kept up that honesty and integrity, the sucoess of Carmarthen was as- sured. He concluded by eliciting a happy angery from the very prophecy of destruction which he had mentioned. When he first came to Carmarthen, he was told with regard to the Old Oak in Priory-street, that when that was destroyed, Carmarthen would perish. Ho went to soo it one day, and found it bleak and bare, and carefully propped up. Some time afterwards, however, he again visited if, and to his surprise and delight it was covered with leaves, while from it had sprung a new, green tree. Perhaps the old Carmarthen was dying, but like tho Old Oak, it had sent forth a new tree, and it was his earnest wish that the young life of Carmarthens hould grow up like that tree, and bring too town dignity and prosperity (applause^ Lord Tiverton, in proposing the health of the Chairman, spoke in felicitous terms of Sir James' distinguished oonneotion with the county, and the leading part whioh he always took in ail the public movements, and everything that made for the good of the community. Sir James Drummond in replying, thanked Lord Tiverton for what he had said, and expressed his pleasure and pride at presiding that evening. As he (Sir James) was coming from Cardiff that day, he met a. gentleman in the train who he had never seen before, but who was a Carmarthenshire man, now living in the Rhondda. He was going to Llan- dyssnl TO bury a relative. They got talking, and Sir James said that, he was going to Carmarthen for the centenary dinner of tho JOURNAL, and this gcntloman told him that although a Liberal he at- ways read tho JOURNAL, and he considered it one of the finest, and soundest papers he had ever read or wiRh-xl to read (applause). He 'Sir James) was very delighted and proud to hear that from a total stranger, whoso name he did not even know TO that minute (applause). He was very sorry that Lord Oawdor. Mr. Mervyn Peel. and his brother TMr. Dudley Drummond) were unable to be there that evening, but he (Sir James) felt it a very great honour to be present and to hear more about the JOURNAL than he had ever heard before. He was delighted with the Rev. George Eyre Evans's speech, which gave such an interesting account of the paper from its earliest ohildhood, and also with the cen- tenary number of the paper, which he would cherish for many years to come. He felt sure that the pro- ceedings that evening would bind them much closer in the future, and he hoped that they wou!d be spared for many years to support ami back-up the JOURNAL, and it would do as much good in the future as it had done in the oast (applause). He was very glad to meet Lord Tiverton, and remem- bered his fat. her in 1374. when ho was CHAIRMAN of the Qua iter Sessions, and although he (Sir James) was not a magistrate for the county until 1378. he remembered Lord Cawdor, who succeeded Lord Ilalsbury as chairman VF the Quarter Sessions, pattintr him ritrht. on A point, of law (laughter), that. was stamped on hiB memorv to that dav, and he thought it was a, artoat achievement on the nart of {"m{ -Cawdor.-{applause). He honed that Lord Hals- bury would be connected with the countv tor many years—although LIE was an old gentleman he was still a magistrate for the eountv. and he hoped to have the pleasure of seeing him there on rnany future occasions (applause). He was trreatly interested and ulaesed to }"1r ♦he speeches of tlw Rev. Griflith Thomas and Mr. Wheldon, and to honr so much about Carmarthen from them. As they »«U knew, he took a great interest, in the welfare OF the. town, and there- was no town or borough in Wales which deserved 'rreater honour OR nrosporitv than it did. HE was only too pleased to find that the National F'steddfod was coming there yenr. "(1 thev fwd ill A great MEASURE to thank AIR. Wheldon for having fought, their battles so before the authorities, and doinir so much to achieve the desired ROSNLT, (hear. hear). He lnd had to T-TEKLE Lord Tredegar and some other Monmouth- shire MAGISTRATES, when HE went to the Gorsodd meeting in London, but CARMARTHEN had won the ba'tle. and he honed thev would win the (Vown a" well (anplou.se). He (Rir James) wa" looking for- «'<ir*l to i," eisteddfod with trreat. iov (ENPLAIWH lie thanked them all T-rv jnnch for their he-mv re~I>onso to the toast of HIS health, AMI felt it A very crrent honour INDEED to be PRECRNF TO eolelirnte th"- rent-ell: TV of the .ToVHNAl which h", J>o;-»ed would ;RLorify IT for many years to come (lend and continued applause). SOME REFLECTIONS BY A GUEST. Through the courtesy of the genial Editor of the JoUftX.U., I v\ AS privileged with an invitation to attend this memorable function. I accepted tho invitation with idacrity, anticipating a pleasant, evening. j t, is not. my intention hfrf) to dilate upon the admirable way in which the arrangements of the evening were carried* out, I leave that in abler hands, perhaps Ü, Mr. Stokes, if tho Kditor can square him; suffice to say that the evening ot the 1st April, 1910, was u. red-letter day in the history of thiv old county journal, and was, from every point of view, one of the most enjoyable ever spent withiu the banqueting hail of the L'vy Bush. The President, of the evening—Sir James II. W. Drum- mond, Bart., C.B., of Rhydodin—;in hin excellent, speech in RESPONSE to the toast of the "Chairman," made reference to his early association with the town and county of Carmarthen. all know the •attachment that. has always existed bet-ween the good people of Edwinsford and Carmarthenshire; it dates back to a very remote period, long before John Daniel ever founded Ins little Glanc- ing at. the Rhydodin pedigree (which I have at my side), we find that t.ho connection between the W il- liams's and Carmarthenshire runs as tar hack as the 11th century (probably further); the.v served the county in various capacities. The third baronet was member of Parliament, in 1831 anil Ifiirh Sheriff in 1848; the, second baronet wap M.P. in 1802 and Ilitrh Sheriff in 1811. (The "Squibs" circulated during this election WERO very amusing). We have Thomas Williams, of. Rhydodin. Cluincellor and Chamberlain of the Counties of Carmarthen, Pm- broke, and Cardigan earlv in the 17th century; his brother. Sir NICHOLAS Williams, M.P. from 1722 till 1747, was Lord Lieutenant and Custos Rotulorum, he

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I STARVED IN CARMARTHENSHIRE

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