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REVIEW OF THE BRITISH CORN…

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PRESENTATION TO THE HON. HUGH…

FOOTBALL.

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FOOTBALL. ENGLAND v. WALES. The brilliancy of the football last Saturday in England v. Wales, at Blackheath, says a London contemporary, must be recorded as a feature of the season. By its substantial nature the English score would apply an unevenness which at no time existed. From start to finish the matsh was well fought, and although in the second period England had the measure of their opponents, Wales never lost heart for a moment, until No side" played a losing game with energy and excellence rarely equalled. Apart from seven points' score to Eng- land in the first period, there was little to choose between the sides up to half-time, but the second forty minutes brought into prominence the bril- liant rushes which may be said to furnish a char- acteristic in the English game. The home for- wards with their full complement, in the scrum- mage more than held their own after half-time. Previously the Welshmen kept the game very loose, and relied in this way for success, for it gave to the fast light forwards plenty of scope for dribbling and running. And in their tactics they shone se well that England's supporters were not thoroughly confident at the interval. So far Briggs and Emmot, the home halves, bad come out well, both in the attack and defence and it is not too much to say that to them belonged much of the credit of England's advantageous position. From the first try in the second period, the Englishmen had the game in hand then it was that they opened their play, and showed that confidence which earlier had been missing. At all points it was a splendid match, and the better side won. Wales gained little by their extra man out- side the scrummage. It was useful enough in the defence when their rivals were near goal, but as matters went the idea presented itself that another forward would have been more efficacious. A G Gould's kicking, running, and passing were the features of the Welsh back play, and behind for England Alderson was equally prominent. It seemed a little curious that the respective captains should have divided the honours of the three- quarters. Alderson was almost an ideal centre three-quarter back. He always got in his kick, and his passing (if at first a little hasty), and run- ning and dropping were brilliant both in the attack and defence. Lockwood did a lot of sound work, and in two particular instances his coolness alone saved the English lines. Hubbard, who was slightly injured early in the game, made various good runs and tackled well. As already noted Em mot and Briggs, the home halves, played a wonderful game, and their defence in the first half did more than anything to baffle the Welsh attack. The powerful English forwardsat the outset seemed put off their game by the openness of their rival's tactics, bub both sides kept well on the ball, and in the second portion the home forwards' genuine Bcrainuiage work proved very profitable. A season or so ago, Londoners were familiar with the play the second portion the home forwards' genuine Bcrainuiage work proved very profitable. A season or so ago, Londoners were familiar with the play °!i Gould, but they never saw him to better advantage than on this occasion, and one other good point in the Welsh football was the game of Bancroft, the full b ick, whose kicking and tackling werp unerring. The conditions for tho game were favourable in every way, the bright and keen atmosphere of Blackbeath gave to the a day life- giving effect, and the 15,000 people gathered on the Rectory field showed by enthusiasm how much was their appreciation of the football and the weather. The Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress were among the spectators. Of the nine matches played, Eng- land has won all except those of 1886-87, at Llanelly, drawn, and 1989-90, at Dawsbury, when Wales scored one try to nil. The Lord Mayor (Mr Alderman Evans) and party were spectators for the greater part of the time the match was in progress. SCOTLAND v. WALES. The international watch (R Ig > > tstwe-n th -S'j two te iai-4, will be played at Swansea, on 6aturday, the 6th day of February next.

,CARMARTHEN BOARD OF GUARDIANS.

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THE REPRESENTATION OF THE…

INFLUENZA.—LA GRIPPE.

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A PLEASANT, SAFE, AND RELIABLE…

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- ; THIS WILL SETTLE THE QUESTION.

LIFE-BOAT SERVICES IN 1891.

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF WALES…

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MR. PRYSE-RICE'S HOUNDS.

THE MAGAZINES.

:= THE SOUTH WALES MINERS'…

MINERS' WAGES REDUCED.

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