Hide Articles List

21 articles on this Page

REVIEW OF THE BRITISH CORN…

News
Cite
Share

REVIEW OF THE BRITISH CORN TRADE. The rainfall of 1891 at a well-known station qQ north of London was 29-73 inches, being « lo in. above the average. At a station only a few miles to the south-west 30'9fi in. were registered, the iffe rence being mainly on February and Novembei totals. In February, the north of London station no rain fell at all ■These figures show that the variation in rainfall were very local, but they agree in credit- ing the old year with over three inches of super- abundant moisture. To restore the balance 1892 should be a dry year. It should also be a warm one, for the mean temperature of 1891 was only 48'5 deg., against a fifty years' average of 49.03 deg. The difference seems slight, but being a daily mean deficiency, amounts to 193 deg. on the year. On the theory of average we are entitled to a summer, each day of which shall be 2 deg. warmer than the corresponding day in 1891. Let U8 hope that what we are entitled to in theory we shall obtain in practice. The autumn sowings of wheat look healthy, and 1892 may easily give us a good crop. English wheat has been selling at a decline at the markets held since Christmas. The mean value of wheat for December is, however, but 5d below November value, and the average for the entire year shows 5a 4d advance on 1890 which in turn was 2s dearer than 1889. We have re- gained 78 4d out of a 10s 3d depression. Profit vanes from county to county, and even from pariah to parish, according to rents and rates, soil, and the labour bill fer cultivating it. The price of machinery is the only item which is at all level. Making, however, all possible allowance for local divergencies the 40s level for wheal remains the nearest of approximations to the mean rate at which wheat ean profitably be grown. When prices had fallan to 29s 9d the crisis was very serious, for the grower was losing 25 per cent. on his wheat as wheat. Its value in rotations and the price of straw remained the only reasons for its con- tinuing to be grown, and these two links were not strong enough to support of themselves an entire theory of arable and cereal agriculture. To-day 2a lid out of the 10s 3d remain for 1892 to re- cover, but where 7s 4d has actually been regained in two years, the recovery of 2s lid in the third year admits of being regarded as a reasonable hope. The very fact that the American wheat Burplus of 1891 was the largest on record, an argument put in the forefront by every miller who is selling cheap wheat, is in itself an argument for ultimate firmness, seeing that the purely exceptional abundance of American wheat is scarcely to be looked for in a new cereal year. If Russian deficiency in 1891 has been as abnormal as American good fortune, it is to be noted that America's normal production of wheat is about double that of Russia, and the restoration of both America and Russia to an average production would cause a decrease in the total available wheat supply. Foreign wheat during the last seven days of December sold slowly, but only ten markets out of forty were in any way cheaper, and a clear majority were recorded as firm. Increased steadiness in wheat prices has been obaerved in America, and has strengthened the hands of holders of American wheat in the United Kingdom. The trade in spring corn has been slightly in buyers' favour. For barley 8 markets out of 20 for oats 3 out of 8, for pulse 7 out of 14, and for maize 10 oat of 15 have been of that tenour. The total proportion whic h these figures give, 28 to 29, does not show serious weakness, and with the cessation of all Russian arrivals of barley, oats, and maize there is a certain natural tendency of the market vessel to rieht itself The change to mild weather has its Natural effect! which is to postpone recovery. The quantity 900 ^Z0 0n Pa8P1ge i8 228'°°° qrs., against 229,000 VS. a week ago; of barley, 208,500 qrs., TC8t 8,500 JqrS; ;,0f bean9' 22^° 1rs- against am(i llDseed. 133,000 qrs., against 145,000 qrs. There is no uniform tendency, but the reductions exceed the accretions to the total prospective supply. Last week's imports into the United Kingdom included 30 000 qrs. of barley, 70,000 qrs. of oats, and 99,890 qrs. of maize against 70,000 qrs. of barley, 105,500 qrs. of oats', and 91,300 qril of maize iu the week preceding. Mark Lane Express. TRADE IN THE WEST. Now that things are getting back into their normal condition, we are enabled to speak a little more hopefully of the prospects of trade, which is certainly showing gratifying signs of revival in more than one department. Fat beef has undoubtedly been selling a little better during tha past few days, and although from lls to 12s per score may be taken as the general run of pricos, this, all things considered, cannot be said to be very discouraging. Milch beasts, though still in request, have hardly been so much sought after still prices are being maintained, anything at all serviceable bringing £] 8 to X22, whilst more [ ordinary lots are from X14 to j £ L7. Although the price of barreners rules low, still there is evidently a better tone animating the trade, and from J622 to j528 per pair can now be readily obtained for animals of a serviceable stamp. Mutton just now is coming to market in such small quantities that prices promise to become much more remu- nerative ere long best wethers finding a quick sale at 8* to 9d per lb., and ewes 8d to 8 £ d.

MARKETS. tt...: ; .--">

Advertising

PRESENTATION TO THE HON. HUGH…

FOOTBALL.

,CARMARTHEN BOARD OF GUARDIANS.

Advertising

THE REPRESENTATION OF THE…

INFLUENZA.—LA GRIPPE.

Advertising

A PLEASANT, SAFE, AND RELIABLE…

Advertising

- ; THIS WILL SETTLE THE QUESTION.

LIFE-BOAT SERVICES IN 1891.

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF WALES…

Advertising

MR. PRYSE-RICE'S HOUNDS.

THE MAGAZINES.

:= THE SOUTH WALES MINERS'…

MINERS' WAGES REDUCED.

Advertising