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CHINESE TORTURES.

THE HOOP SNAKE.

"BESS OF HARDWICK."

AN ACTRESS WHO REFUSED TO…

RUSSIAN GAOLS FULL.

IRREVERENCE FOR THE DEAD.

PRINCE BISMARCK ON MUSIC.

HOW AUTHORS DIFFER.

THE WORLD'S FAIR AT CHICAGO.

IHORRIBLE DEATH IN A FURNACE.I

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THE SCORPION AND THE VIOLIN. A correspondent writes to the Spectator to con- firm %i hat that journal has recently said about the scorpion's very sensitive ear for the violin." "I have," says the correspondent, "studied the habits of the scorpion for many years, and have often noticed how every sensi- tive scorpions are to the most delicate sound, musical or otherwise. Under the thorax the scorpion has two comb-like appendages, which are the antenne (pectinate). It is pretty well settled by physiologists and entomologists that in insects the antenme represent the organs of hearing. These delicate structures are easily affected by the vibrations of sound, and there can be no doubt whatever that they are also affected by sounds quite inaudible to the human ear. The slightest vibration of'the'atinosphere, from any cause whatever, at once puts in motion the delicate structures which compose the an- tennae, to which organs insects owe the power of protecting themselves against danger, as well as the means of recognising the approach of one another. Spiders have wonderful eyesight, but I am quite sure that the scorpion's vision, not- withstanding his six eyes, is far from being acute. It is very difficult to catch a spider with a pair of forceps, but a scorpion can be easily captured, if no noise is made. Spiders see their prey before they are caught in the web but the scorpion makes no movement whatever to seize flies or cockroaches until they indicate their whereabouts by movements. This being the case, it can readily be understood how easily a scorpion may be roused into motion by the vibrations of music, as described in the article alluded to. If a tuning-fork be sounded on the table on which I keep my caged scorpion, he at once becomes agitated, and strikes out viciously with his s ing. On touching him with the vibrating tuning-fork, he stings it, and then coils himself up, as scor- pions do when hedged in. In Jamaica, the negroes believe that scorpions know their name; so they never call out, See, a scorpion," when they meet with one on the ground or wall, for fear of his escaping. They thus indirectly rec- ognize the scorpion's appreciation of sound but if you wish to stop a scorpion in his flight, blow air on him from the mouth, and he at once coils himself up. I have repeatedly done this but with a spider it has a contrary effect. Music charms a snake into silence, as the experiments at the Zoo and elsewhere prove but the agitated contortions and withings of the scorpion when roused by the sound of the violin only prove that they are roused by the vibrations of sound caused by music, and this would happen if they were disturbed by the discordant sounds of a penny trumpet or any other unmusical instru- ment.

THE ARCHDUKE AND THE GIPSIES.

CHILIAN CUSTOMS.

THE BISHOP OF ADELAIDE AND…

AN AUSTRIAN TRAGEDY.

THE LATEST STRONG MAN.

AMMANFORD AMUSEMENTS.

A CARMARTHENSHIRE NOVEL.I

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| PENBRYN (CARD.). | '* 1^1…

---_-------_----THE SCORPION…

THE ARCHDUKE AND THE GIPSIES.

CHILIAN CUSTOMS.

THE BISHOP OF ADELAIDE AND…

AN AUSTRIAN TRAGEDY.

THE LATEST STRONG MAN.

AMMANFORD AMUSEMENTS.