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REVIEW OF THE BRITISH CORNI…

« , 'óMARKETS.

TITHE AGITATION.

WATERFORD ELECTION.

THE ROYAL SHOW AT WARWICK.

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I THE NEW FACTORY REGULATIONS.

,GLADSTONIAN FACTS.

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GLADSTONIAN FACTS. The following letter appeared in a recent issue of the Times Sip.The Gladstonians are distributing all over the country a leaflet headed The Cost of Coercion," which contains the following words "In 1878, when war with Russia threatened, we had 109,201 soldiers at home. To-day we have 106,767 For what purpose ? To coerce Ireland. In 1885 we had only 91,579 in 1886 we had 98,057. Coercion is thus responsible for an increase of 8,710 We have 30,000 troops in Ireland, who annually cost us £ 2,250,000 As Mr Gladstone has worked it out, the home service charye for the Army is 16s per head of population in Ireland, against 58 per head in Great Britain That is to say, it costs about lis for every man woman, and child to collect landlords' rents and to drive the tenants from their homes." I need hardly say that it would be difficult to compose a more complete tissue of falsehoods, and those who publish it are perfectly well aware of this, but unfortunately a large number of the less educated portion of the electors take it for absolute truth, as they do every statement made by Gladstenians, and they believe that the population of Ireland are actually being charged 16s per head for the maintainance of troops there, while the English only pay 5s per head. They have not the smallest idea that the charges for the Army are provided out of one consolidated fund, and that as far as taxation goes it would not make the slightest difference if every soldier were quartered in England, Scotland, or Ireland. It seems almost childish to have to notice these falsehoods, but if they are left unnoticed they are believed. Gladstonian orators are very fond of dilating on the number of troops quartered in Ireland which they variously estimate at from 30,000 to 40,000, according to the humour they happen to be in. The facts are these—the average number of troops in Ireland in 1872, was 27,000 in 1882, a little over 29'000 and on September 1 last, 27,600. In no other year than 1882, at any rate since 1861, has the average strength reached 28,000. The force at home is regulated by the force we have to maintain abroad, and troops are quartered in Ireland because we have not barrack accommodation for them in Great Britain. The real excess kept in Ireland is cavalry, and they are kept because it is cheaper. The Government are quite willing to reduce the force in Ireland, but the population resent any reduction of troops as a direct reduction of in- come. The War Office is flooded with petitions the moment such an idea is mooted. I am, Sir, your obedient servant. A UNIONIST. December.

MR. CHAMBERLAIN AND THE GENERAL…

THE AMERICAN TIN PLATE MANUFACTURERS.

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