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REVIEW OF THE BRITISH CORNI…

« , 'óMARKETS.

TITHE AGITATION.

WATERFORD ELECTION.

THE ROYAL SHOW AT WARWICK.

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I THE NEW FACTORY REGULATIONS.

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I THE NEW FACTORY REGULATIONS. The following notice has been issued from the Home Office to all occupiers of factories calling attention to the provisions of the new Factory Act, which comes into force on Jan. 1, 1892.— Gentlemen,—I beg to call your attention to some of the chief alterations in the law affectin" factories, consequent upon the cming into operatiou of the Factory and Workshop Act, 18.)1. I enclose an abstract of the Act, which is to be substituted for that which has been affixed heretofore. Safety Hoists must be fenced whether any person is liable to come near them or not. All dangerous parts of the machinery, as well as every part of the mill-gearing, must now be fenced, unless safe by construction or position; and straps or bands are included in machinery. All places where over forty people are employed must bo provided with reasonable means of escape in the event of fire. Overtime In factories where overtime is legal notice of the overtime made must be sent to her Majesty's Inspector before eight p.m. of the same evening, and the particulars of each occasion must be kept posted in the prescribed form. -Holidays Notice of dates of intended holidays must be posted in the factory during the first week in January, and a copy thereof sent on the same day to her Majesty's Inspector of the district, but the holidays may, on a fortnight's notice, be afterwards changed.—Child-birth, employment after A woman is not ailowed to resume work till four weeks after child-birth.—Commencing age of children After Jan 1, 1893, a child is not to be employed under eleven years of age, but those legally employed at that date may con- tinue.—Birth certificate: On presentation of the proper requisition, which must be supplied free by every superintendent registrar and regis- trar, a certificate of birth for any person under 16 is to be given for 6d.-Accidents For an accident be reportable, it must now, in addition to being the result of the same causes as before, be of such a nature as to prevent the injured per- son from returning to his or her work and doing five hours' work on any day during the next three days after the accident. The notice of the accident must now state to where the injured person has now been removed as well as his address.—Particulars of value Every weaver who is engaged in the cotton, worsted, or woolen, or linen or jute manufacture, or as a winder, weaver, or reeler in the cotton trade, and is paid by the piece, shall be supplied by the occupier with sufficient particu- lars to enable him to ascertain the rate of wages which he is entitled to be paid.—List of out- workers A very important provision. Every occupier, if so required by the Secretary of State, keep a list of the names and addresses of all persons to whom work is sent out to be done and these again, if they send out work, must do the same thing. All the lists to be open to inspection by her Majesty's Inspector of Factories. —Special Rules The Secretary of State may make special rules to apply to any factory or process of manual labour that is dangerous or injurious to health. These are to be adminis- tered by her Majesty's Inspector of Factories. —Factory Bakehouses All bakehouses where steam or other mechanical power is used are now subject to the powers of entry and inspec- tion conferred on her Majesty's Inspector of Factories by the Factory and Workshop Act, 1878.-1 am, gentlemen, your obedient servant (signed) FREDERICK H. WHYMPER, her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Factories and Workshops.

,GLADSTONIAN FACTS.

MR. CHAMBERLAIN AND THE GENERAL…

THE AMERICAN TIN PLATE MANUFACTURERS.

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