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TE iROES, DYFFRYN CERDIN.1

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LLANYBRI.

PENCADER.

GOLDEN GROVE.

CAPEL CYNON (CARDIGANSHIRE).

LAM PETER.

CONWIL ELVET.

PEMBROKE.

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ILLANDOVERY.

KIDWELLY.

CARDIGAN.

CHRISTMASTIDE AT CARMARTHEN.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. 1-11111----

PENCADER.

ANTI-WELSH.

BOGUS DEGREES.,s ————— I 1

THE REPRESENTATION OF THE…

LIME. -

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LIME. To the Editor of THE JOURNAL. DEAR SIR.-In the article on lime in your issue of the 25th inst, I find much that is difficult to follow. The difficulties in great part arise from the indefinite way some words-more especially the word lime are used. Your corespondent speaks of lime as existing in two conditions, burnt and unburnt. What is here referred to as lime in the burnt condition corresponds when free from impurities to oxide of Calcium more gener- ally known as lime, What is referred to as lime in the uuburnt condition, coiresponds when free from impurities to carbonate of calcium improperly called carbonate of lime. Your corres- pondent then gwes Oil to say I b,-tt lime can be used with excellent effect (a) on soils that are defective in it (b) on tough clays (c) on soile which contnin a large amount of organic matters. Are we to under- stand tlial here ti.e word lime is to have the douhlc significance that your correspondent gives it. I have always understood that the operations of oxide of eilciu-n and corbonate of calcium in agriculture depend npon entirely different principles. With special reference to (a) aud (c). Would your correspondent use oxide of calcium on soils deficient in calcareous matter if they contained soluble vegetable or animal manure in any quantity ? I hardly think it would be with excellent effect. The paragrppb devoted to the silicates of ammonia, potash, &c., is somewhat obscure. Am I to understand from it that your correspondent advocates the addition of oxide of calcium to soils comparatively rich in the double silicates of alumina with ammonia and potash. I should also like some light thrown on the state- ment that chalk supplies the soil with phosphoric acid. Perhaps, in the interest of agriculture, your correspondent will remove these difficulties. Yours truly, LICHEN.

LLANGADOCK.

LLANGUNLLO.

LLANFYNYDD.