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AN EASTERN WIFE'S REVENGE.

TOES FOR FINGERS.

A BARREL OF XXX.

MAN AND BEAST FIGHT.

THE BEGGAR'S BANK BOOK.

THE FIRST CHANNEL STEAMER.

A TRAIN ATTACKED BY BRIGANDS.

----WHAT DID HE MEAN?

A RELIC OF POMPEII.I

--A BATHING MASTER ATTACKED…

CAREFUL SON-IN-LAW.

A COWBOY'S TOOTHACHE.

A LUCKY PROFESSION.

FARM AND GARDEN.

THE MISER'S DIAMOND NECKLACE.

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THE MISER'S DIAMOND NECKLACE. In the year 1740 there lived in the Latin quarter in Paris, a famous miser named Jean Avere. The wealth concealed in the obscure rookery where he resided was believed to be fabulous, and was no doubt really very great. Among his treasures was a celebrated diamond necklace of immense value. This he concealed so carefully that be ultimately forgot its hiding-place himself. He sought dili gently for weeks, and failing to find it, became almost insane. This rendered him even less capable of remembrance, and he took to his bed broken in body as in mind. A few weeks later a doctor and an old woman, who had sometimes done odd jobs about his house, were both at his bed-side seeing that the end was near. As the clock in the neigh- bouring tower tolled one, he ceased his low muttering and sat up and shrieked, "I remember where it is now. I can put my hand on the neck- lace. For God's sake let me go for it before I fol,(ret it a,,riin! Here his weakness and excite- ment overcame him, and he sank back among his rags, stone dead. Physicians and students are familiar with these rudden outflashirgs of memory at the great crisis of human fate. Let the reader consider this while we relate an episode in the humble career of a Signalman, Andrew Agge, who may be found on duty in his box at Culgaith, a little station on the Midland, twenty- three miles south of Carlisle. Mr Agge is on duty nearly every day, and must break his fast without leaving his post. The strongest men cannot stand it long without feeling its effects. It makes one think of the passionate exclamation in Tom Hood's Song of the Shirt," Ob, God! that bread should be so dear, Aud flesh and blood so cheap." Our friend had been at the same work for many years, although he was only thirty-five when these lines were written. In 1884 he began to feel that he was about to break down. I don't know what ails me," he would say, but I can't eat." What he forced down produced no sense of satisfaction or strength, Sometimes he was alarmed at finding he could scarcely walk on account of giddiness. He said to himself, What if I should be seized with this at some moment when there is trouble on the line, and I need all my wits about me? Other features of this ailment were pains in the chest and sides, costiveness, yellow skin and eyes, bad taste in the mouth, risings of foul gas in the throat, &c. The doctor said Agge must give up his confining work or risk utter disability. He could not. Wife and children were in the way. So he remained at his post and grew worse. But his work was always right, telegrams were properly received and sent, and no train got into trouble through any neglect or fault of his. His disease -i-,aigestion and dyspepsia-took a step further, and brought on kidney and bladder trouble. The doctor, at Appleby, said, Mr Agge, you are poisoned with the foul stuff in your stomach and blood." His doom seemed to be sealed. It was like a death warrant. Six months more rolled by. On duty one morning be was attacked with so great and so sharp a distress he could neither sit nor stand. He says: I tumbled down on that locker and lay there all the forenoon. Signals might be given, the telegraph needle might click, bat I heeded them no more than a man in the grave heeds the beating of the rain against his own tombstone." He was alone at first, but help arrived, and the poor signalman was carried home. Physicians laboured on his case without avail. Around his bed were his five little children, the mother being absent in an institution, to be treated for a serious ailment. Here he lay for weeks, part of the time uncon- scious. Nothing was to be done but to wait for the end. Then the torpid faculties awakened for a moment. Memory flashed up, cm" he recalled the fact that a medicine which he had used with benefit years before, and then thrown aside and forgotten, was concealed in (t secret place at the signal box. He sent for it, nnd took a dose. Soon his bowels moved, the kidneys acted, the pain was ceased.the felt better. With brightened hope he sent to Carlisle for more. It arrived. He used it, and in a few days the doctors were astonished to find their patient out of doors, and on the road to recovery. He regained his health completely, and in speaking of his experience, said to the writer, What a wonderful thing it was that on what promised to be my death- bed, I suddenly remembered where I had put that halt-used bottle of Mother Seigel's Curative Syrup. That flash of memory probably saved me from death."

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MAN AND BEAST FIGHT.