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AN EASTERN WIFE'S REVENGE.

TOES FOR FINGERS.

A BARREL OF XXX.

MAN AND BEAST FIGHT.

THE BEGGAR'S BANK BOOK.

THE FIRST CHANNEL STEAMER.

A TRAIN ATTACKED BY BRIGANDS.

----WHAT DID HE MEAN?

A RELIC OF POMPEII.I

--A BATHING MASTER ATTACKED…

CAREFUL SON-IN-LAW.

A COWBOY'S TOOTHACHE.

A LUCKY PROFESSION.

FARM AND GARDEN.

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FARM AND GARDEN. POINTS IN POULTRY REARING. The following are from the report of the Central ExDeriment Farm, Ottawa, Canada 1. Make hens lay when eggs are (tearest. 2. Breed stock when eggs are cheap. 3. Keep a non-sitting breed to lay when sitters are hatching, and pay expenses of the latter. 4. Breed as many chickens as possible and as early as possible. They all represent so much money. 5. Keep all the pullets. They are worth 2 dols. each as prospective early winter layers. 6. Kill, or otherwise dispose of, all hens after three years of age. 7. Breed the best flesh-formers for market. Feed them up to as great a weight as possible. 8. Well-fattened, well-dressed poultry will bring the best prices from the best customers. 0 9. If not accustomed to poultry begin a small number. Learn to make a success of the few, then go on with a larger number. 10. Do not neglect the little essentials to success such as lime, gravel, meat, plenty of clean water, green food, dust bath, &c., &c., regularly supplied to layers. 11. Keep strict account of every cent of expendi- ture and receipts. Charge the poultry with all expenses, and credit them with all receipts. The droppings at 75 cents per barrel will go a long way to pay for food. 12. Market gardeners and dairymen are particu- larly well situated to permit of their dealing pro- fitably in poultry. The former have spare time in winter; the latter are among the best customers in the city every day. CHEESE-MAKING. In his annual report, Professor James W. Robertson, of Ontario, gives a number of con- clusions as the result of his latest experiments in cheese-making. These show that the average shrinkage in weight on the cheese from August 30th (one and two days after the cheese was made)—to October 18tli was 5.08 per cent.; the shrinkage from October 18th to January 3rd was i to nør nfint. The ouantitv of rennet used in 1" J. cheese-making does not hasten or retard the curing process, except as a larger or less proportion of water (or moisture) is retained in the cheese by its use. For long-keeping cheese, the smallest quantity of rennet that will perfectly coagulate the milk, fit for cutting, in from forty five to fifty minutes at 86 deg. Fahr. will give the best results. A proportionately larger quantity of rennet should be used when the milk is over-ripe or acidy. For spring and early summer-made cheese the quantity of salt should not exceed 2slb. per 1,000 lb. of milk for mid-summer and autumn- made'cheese the rate should be increased to 2 £ lb., then to 2$lb., then to 3 lb. of salt per 1,000 lb. of milk. The tests with matting and close packing, versus matting, versus loose stirring, indicate that not one of these treatments is essential to the making of finest cheese; the main point is that the whey erhall be stirred out of the curd until it becomes "dry and firm" before the acid is developed, to cause the acid to draw out" on the hot-iron test as far as half-an-incb. When that is provided for, the matting and packing result in giving to the cheese a more flakey and silky texture. The setting temperature does not seem to exercise any import- ant influence on the quality of the cheese, in ordinary practice 86 deg. is the most serviceable temperature; when the milk is acidy or over-ripe a higher temperature is more conducive to the certain manufacture of cheese of fine texture and body. WINTER GREENS. 1 A good supply of green vegetables during tne winter season is naturally of the utmost importance, and no pains should be spared to ensure an abundance of the various subjects included under this head. In the summer we have plenty of peas,beans,asparagus, and a dozen other dainties, but from November until the following May scarcely anything, beyond potatoes and other root crops, is to be had but some of the various kinds of Brassica—that is, of course, from the open ground, for where forcing is carried on under glass, the list is greatly extended. The time has now arrived when the plants for the earlier crops to come fit for use from October to Christmas or the New Year, must be set out, and from now onwards successional batches should be plauted at intervals for the next two months or more. BRUSSELS SPROUTS. This is now a very favourite vegetable, and certainly one of the best as regards flavour, as well as highly productive. The best plants are those that were sown early in February, or not later than the middle of March, and got out as soon aa they became large enough. Plants sown thus early will probably have been already set out, or if not it must be done already, but a successional batch planted at the same time as other things will do wall, and become fit for use about Christmas, or later. In good soil the plants should be allowed 18 inches apart, with 2 feet between, the rows. Fool) may be wasted by giving too much as well as toe little. The wise poultry-man is ho who avoids both extremes, and feeds just enough to keep is chicks growing rapidly, but gives thorn none .0 bo trampled under fuut, theu sour, and breed disease.

THE MISER'S DIAMOND NECKLACE.

HOUSE OF COMMONS' TIME TABLE.

IMPORTANT DATES TO BE OBSERVED…

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MAN AND BEAST FIGHT.