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DEGREE DAY AT LAMPETER COLLEGE. On Wednesday morning last the ceremony of con- ferring degrees on the successful students of the above College was gone through before a large and repfesentative audience of friends and others, who had come to witness the proceedings, which took place in the College Hall. The Principal, who was supported on the plat- form by the examiners, the graduates, licentiates, and incorporated and past members of the College Board (in caps and gowns), said it was usual, before the formal and important ceremony of con- ferring degrees, for the Principal to make some remarks as to the history of the College during the past year, and before calling upon the University examiners to make their report public. The Col- lege during the past year had little or no history, except, what one may call, of a domestic character. They missed faces there that day that they would all very much like to see. First of all the Visitor (Bishop of St: David's), to whom the College owed so much, and who was unable to be present in con- sequence of the consecration of the Bishop of Bangor, which took place the preceding day in London, whence he proposed going for a well- earned holiday. Again, the Bishop of Llandaff had written to say that he was there in spirit, but could not be in person. He was-as his ancestors had been-a martyr to his loyalty (laughter), as his Queen's command was that he should attend a State concert that night, and therefore could not be at Lampeter that morning. Again, the Bishop of St. Asaph was not with them. His work pre- vented him, and he had lately paid a visit to South Wales when opening the new Welsh Church at Carmarthen, but at the same time they had the good wishes of the three prelates with them. They would agree with him that the Church in Wales was well represented in that hall, when they had the Dean of St. Asaph (hear, hear), and it was a special pleasure to them to welcome once more-a welcome most heartily given by town and College —Professor Ryle (loud cheers), and feel that, though kinship may, after a fashion, be broken, the ties of kindness still existed between them (hear, hear). The successes of the past year, which came before them, were: J. T. Jones, 4th class, and J. Jones, 3rd Mathematical Moderations, 1889, at Wadham W. J. Cole, 2nd Mathematical Finals, 1889, at Keble; W.*|Williams, 2nd Classi- cal Moderations, 1890; L. J. Roberts, History Exhibitioner, Exeter College; & R. E. Owen, Classi- cal Exhibitioner; D. O. Marsden, Historical Scholar; W. Williams, Classical Exhibitioner, and G. M. Grace, Science Exhibitioner, at Jesus College; A. C. Illingworth, History Exhibitioner, Lincoln; and W. Lewis, 30th Wrangler. He himself looked with pleasure upon the exhibitions taken out of Jesus College, because he thought it would be the start of an important work between that College and their own, which was extremely desirable. They missed the warm interest in his pupils of Professor Tout, but he had gone to a wider sphere of work, where he justified the title recently given him; again, they had missed the hearty and cheerful face of Mr Thompson (hear, bear), because Christ's Church had adopted him into her more ample arms. If Professor Owen Evans was not there, he could always be turned to as a friend. The Dean of St. Asaph had found at Llandovery a man carrying out the same admirable and success- ful work of what was now the greatest of their Welsh Schools. The present Warden of Llandovery College was only divided by distance, and that not very great. They had undoubtedly lost good men, so in their successors they had equally, without a doubt, gained. They welcomed there that day Professor Williams, one of Mr Tout's historical pupils (hear, hear), who carried out at Oxford the promise of his Lampeter career. One loss he had to record without a corresponding gain, except to himself, a loss to the College and the Church in Wales, an example of what a Lampeter man and clergyman should be, namely, Canon Williams, Llanelly. He trusted his example would stick to them all. He was glad and thankful to say that many of those who received their hoods there a year ago were now doing a useful work, as, no doubt, those who put on the graduate that day would do in their turn. Taking the College as a whole, he did not say that there were no short- comings among its six score men, as he wished that the services at the chapel were more constant. The students were doing good work he attributed that not to the students themselves so much, but more 3specially to the co-operation of his colleagues, which he was bound to acknowledge. He remem- bered no time during his residence there that that co-operation had been more sound and more willing than at the present time. The list did not, perhaps, show very brilliant successes, except on the science side (hear, hear) but he thought that when the examiners came before them, they would show that there was good work done there, and it was far better to keep to the standard, withoutlessen- ing it, because they could not come up to it, as that would be eminently prejudicial to their interests. Canon Smith said that the work of their men showed growing improvement in the Ordina- tion examinations in that diocese, and he heard the same of other dioceses. He (the speaker) also heard good things of the work of their men in the Church, and that College, he thought, justified, year by year, its existence, and they firmly believed it was needful for the true progress and true advancement of the Welsh people (cheers). It would, he trusted, take its part, as, indeed, it was doing in the scheme laid before the country- Intermediate Education. It would be premature to say much yet on a subject which needed much calm thought and deliberation, but they did hope to see Lampeter town the centre in the county. He could not, however, but think that there was a risk lest the intermediate schools should attempt an ambitious line and endeavour to usurp the place of the first grade schools. The experiment was going to be tried, destined, no doubt, to have a further development, and he asked Churchmen most earnestly to see that in its development the Church should take its part, and see that the teacher of the Welsh Church was not discoun- tenanced. One word more, not his owa. Some time ago Mr Morgan, one of their graduates at Cardiff, thought that an attempt should be made to set on foot a kind of Lampeter Mission Fund, so that men, having taken degrees and not old enough to have livings, could work in large parishes as assistants, as the training would undoubtedly be ivnaluable to them. He (the speaker) thoroughly agreed with the suggestion, but, of course, it would have to get the approval of the men going out. He trusted that later a meeting of representative Lampeter men may meet to realise it; it would have to be a purely College movement, and he hoped that it would be taken up in earnest by the future men. The Principal then callei upon Mr Haines, one of the examiners. Mr J. T. A. Haines, M.A., Fellow and Lecturer of University College, Oxford, made a general re- port. As to theology he read out some remarks of Mr Watson, stating there were good traces of good work, the faults were faults consisting of wants of scholarships. The first epistle of Corinthians was recognised as very difficult, and was made very much better than the gospel. St. John was also very well done. And some papers were so good that they could have done harder ones. In mathematics, wh;; t was done was of a second hand character. In science, the report of Mr W. J. Sell, M.A., Christ College, Cambridge, was excellent, G. M. Grace getting first class and prize. When a candidate got 94 out of 100 marks in one paper, 95 out of 100 in another, and 83 out of 100 in two other papers, he would have done very well indeed. He congratulated Professor Scott upon the performance of his pupil, and Mr W. H. Hutton, examiner in this department, con- gratulated Professor Williams on the general character of the work. In classics there was a marked improvement in the matter and style of writing the English essay, grammar, spelling, syntax, and other elementary subjects bad greatly improved. What was wanted was vocabulary and expression. As an instance of want of vocabulary, one candidate instead of saying, The eountry was intersected with railways," said The country was intercepted with railways" (laughter). Solid work was done in the stated books, such as Sophacles and Virgil. One thing he noticed of Lampeter ^■ven, when a thing had to be done, and that by vjjj it was not done by halves, but done tliort>uo^'y (hear» hear). Philosophy, so far as it ^presented, in both branches showed high !ks -a nd they would find by comparing it with i t ar ^at more 8olid WOlk was done- He last ye name of James Jones in classics. DieJ1nmnn<r the" second, I>. T. Alban. Speaking and amo gi k was more thorough and sound, generally, the aQd if° 8t d i 3dto Bend written tep„t, and by next year he hoped to be able to record similar good progress. decrees was The ceremony of conferring the degrees was then proceeded with by the Principal and vice- Principal. The following is a complete list of successes:— B.D. DEGREE. Rev H. Lewis Davies, Eglwys Fach. B.A. DEGREE.—HONOURS. theological. Class II.: G. Matthews, Neath E. L. Lewis, Llangranog. Class III. D. Fisher, Feliufoel. Classical. -Class II.; Jamps Jones, Llanwenog. Mathematical. Class II.: A. T. Humphreys, Swansea. Historical. — Class II.: F. D. Pierce, Danburg; A. C. Illingworth, Scarborough. Scie?ttiifc. -Class I.: G. M. Grace, Lampeter. ORDINARY. Theological.-Class I.: H. O. Davies, Llanwinio. Class II. Evan Thomas, Pencader H. T. Millett, Sheerness; J. A. Ree, Penboyr. Class III.; J. A. Davies, Llanrhystyd; J. W. Jones, Merthyr; John Jones, Aberystwyth; D. P. Thomas, Churloy. LICENCE IN DIVINITY. Class II. R. E. Davies, Lampeter; John Williams, Mardy; J. J. Parry, Letterstone; H. Evans, Abergwili. Class III.: R. J. Glenn, Bishops Castle; Evan Jones, Pencader; H. Lloyd, Machynllech W. A. Jones, Llanon W. B. Monger, Swansea (two last bracketed), Morris, Williams, Llanbedrog. MODERATIONS.—SPECIAL OR HONOUR. Theological. -Class I.: John Evans, Abergwili. Class II. John Davies, Llangydeirne. Classical. Class II. D. T. Alban, Lledrod- F. R. Williams, Aberdaro; W. T. Davies, Carmar- then. Mathematical. Class II. F. Percy Bennett, Haverfordwest. Historical Class I. Gruffydd Evans Pontardawe. Literature. Class III. John Philllips, Llandovery. ORDINARY. Class II.: T. A. Thomas, Creguna J. E. Lloyd, Boncath; W. J. Evans, Taliesin. Class III.: Richard Jones, Llanelly J. Rowland Jones, Lampeter J. C. Beynon, Llandilo J. Robert Jones, Blaengarw. William Richards, Llanrhystyd (three last bracketed). Theological Certificate. Class II.: G. M. Grace, Lampeter; F. P. Bennett, Haverfordwest; John Phillips, Llandovery; E. T. M. Evans, Llandovery (two last bracketed). Class III.: W. T. Davies, Carmarthen. RESPONSIONS.—SPECIAL. Theo logical.-C lass II.: P W Francis. Haverford- west Benjamin Davies, Aberdare T Jones Roberts. Glyndyfrdwy. Mathematical. Class II. John Edwards, Aberdovy. Class III.: J B Thomas, Tregaron. Historical. Class I. D Lloyd, Llanybyther; T S Roberts, Fisbguard. Class III.: D A Fisher, Aberaman; *D C Morris (S.D.C. School). ORDINARY, Class 1. Henry Jones, Aberdovy; Jason Thomas, ST. Clears. Class II.: D L Thomas, Brecon: David Jenkins, Burry Port; *H H Hall, Llandyssul School—*M H Jones (S.D.C. School); 0 J Davies, Penmaenmawr. Class III.: Gomer Davies, Llanwrtyd; D T R James, Llansamlet; Llewellyn Davies, Kenfig Hill. *N on-matriculaed candidates. PRIZES. Hebrew (Ollivant.)-G Matthews. Theology.-B L Lewis, G Matthews (bracketed). Classics.—James Jones. Mathe)itatics.-A T Humphreys. History. A C Illingworth, F. D. Pierce (bracketed). > Science.-G M Grace. j WELSH CERTIFICATE. Third Year (including second year biennials).— Clas3 II. Evan Thomas, W A Jones, H Evans, R E Davies, J Jones, M Williams, D P Thomas. Class III.: E Davies, J A Davies, D Fisher, E Jones, J J Davies, D A Rees, J A Rees, J Williams, H 0 Davies, W H Rowlands, J H Evans, D Williams, D W Davies, J B Jones, J W Rees, H Lloyd. Second Year. Class II. Richard Jones, J. Davies, J R Jones, W Richards, J Phillips, J E Lloyd, W J Evans. Class III.: J C Beynon. First Year Biennials. — Class I.: T D James. Class II.: John Bowen, D W Davies, Evan Davies, John Gwyon, Henry Jenkins. Class III. T. Price Evans, D E Jacob, D S Jones, J R Jones, 0 G Owen. Examiners for the B.D. degree; The Very Rev. Charles James Vaughan, D.D. Rev. Edward George King, D.D.; Rev. Walter Lock, M.A. Examiners for tho B.A., degree; Arnold Joseph Wallis, M.A.; Rev. William Holden Hutton, M.A.; Very Rev. John Owen, M.A.; Rev. F. Watson, M.A.; J. T. A. Haines, M.A.; W. J. Sell, M.A.; Rev. J. R. King, M.A. Another interesting ceremony was performed, namely, the incorporation of Canon Smith, of Worcester, as member of the college. THE LUNCHEON. At one o'clock a capital luncheon was laid out in the college schoolroom, presided over by the Principal, supported by Dean Owen, Canon Smith, Professor and Mrs Ryle, Rev F. Watson, vice- Principal Davey, Professor Scott, Mrs Lewes (Llanaeron), and Mrs Edmondes. Among the guests we may mention: Principal and Mri Edmondes, Miss Edmondes, and Miss D. Edmondes, the Vice-Principal and Mrs Davey, Miss Davey, and MissH. Davey, Professor and Mrs Walker, Professors Scott, Williams and Wade, Mr Mostyn, Rev E. G. Green, Lampeter; Rev J. Owen, Dean of St. Asaph Professor A. J. Ryle and Mrs Ryle, Cambridge; Ven. Archdeacon Williams, St. Asaph; Ven. Archdeacon Hilbers, St. David's; Rev J. Gregory Smith, Canon of Worcester; Mr J. T. A. Haines and Rev F. Watson, examiners; Mrs Davies, Mrs King, Mrs Tait, Miss Tait, and Miss C. Tait, Glasgow Rev Canon Bevan and Miss Bevan, St. David's; Miss Evans, Mrs Whitehead, and Miss Whitehead, Mrs and Misses Lewes, Llanllear Major Price Lewes and Misses Lewes, Tyglyn Aeron; Mrs Newland, Llanfair; Mrs Lewis, Llanaeron; Mrs Vaughan Pryse, Bwlchbychan; the Mayor of Lampeter, and Mrs Lloyd, Mr and Mrs D. Lloyd and Mr D. F. Lloyd, Peterwell; Miss Price and Miss D. Price, Mr W. P. Hughes, Mr and Mrs D. Jones, Old Bank Rev D. Jones and Mrs Jones, Rev J. R. Jones, curate, Lampeter; Rev D. D. Evans and Mrs Evans, Pencarreg; Rev D. Morris and Mrs Morris, Silian; Rev H. Jones and Mrs Jones, Llanybyther; Rev Evan Williams and Mrs Williams, Nantcwnlle; Rev T. Phillips and Mrs Phillips, Tregaron; Rev J. Lloyd, Llanpumpsaint Rev W. Jones Williams and Mrs Jones Williams, Llanafan; Rev James Griffiths and Mrs Griffiths, Llangranog; Rev J. T. Griffiths and Mrs Griffiths, Llanilar; Rev T. Davies, Gartheli; Rev Z. Davies, Blaenpennal; Rev D. Jones, Llansadwrn; Rev H. Evans, Llancrwys; Rev Prebendary Williams and Mrs Williams, Aberystwyth; Rev T. R. Walters and Mrs Walters, Carmarthen Rev T. Jones and Mr& Jones, Penboyr; Rev E. Alban, Lledrod Mr and Mrs J. J. Lloyd Williams, Grammar School, Carmarthen; Rev Llewellyn Edwards, Aberyswyth; Rev J. L. Williams, Chaplain to the Duke of Cleveland; Rev John Young, Swansea; Mr J. Bancroft, H.M.I., Tenby; Mr C. H. Thompson, Oxford; Rev C. G. Brown, Principal of the South Wales Training College; Dr. Hearder, Carmar- then Mr T. H. R. Hughes, Neuaddfawr; Mr and Mrs Bankes-Price, Doldrement; Mrs and Miss Pierce, Chelmsford; Mr Lawrence Bowen, Bridge- water; Mr W. L. Phillips, Cilgwyn; Mr W. Lawis, Cambridge; Rev and Mrs W. R. Lloyd, Llanstephan; Rev Evan Davies, Abertillery Rev Evan Derrie, Cardiff; Rev H. M. Williams, Llandeusant; Rev H. Jones and Mrs Jones, Llangunllo; Rev E. Evans, Moelgrove; Rev T. J. Bowen and Mrs Bowen, Llangadock; Mr John Jones, Ddeunant; Rev L. Davies, Skiwen; Mr A. Wolfe, Swansea; Rev G. Roberts, Llangyfelach Rev J. D. Lewis, Llinilar; Rev D. Worthington, Llangeitho; Rev D. Davies, St. Dogmells; and the graduates of June 1890. The loyal toast having been received, Vice- Principal Davey proposed The Bishops and Clergy." He would restrict himself within the Principality and the work done there, as the bishops and clcrgy in Wales would appertain to those in Fngland, as they belonged to one and the same body, and the clergy in Wales were the clergy in the Church of England. He would say little of the extensive labours and energies of their bishops aud their clergy. The bishops of Wales were con- spicuous there that day by their absence, but higher thiugs in the Church had prevented them the pleasure of seeing their faces that day. They all knew what happened in London the preceding day, for the first time in the history of the Church in Wales. Two bishops were consecrated for Wales, and for the first time a suffragan proper was appointed for that diocese (hear, hear). It was a new starting point, as it were, in their onward progress-the progress of tho Church in Wales (hear, hear). A few years ago—perhaps longer than any present could remember-there was a plan made for having the two bishoprics of North Wales amalgamated, implying at the same time the solidity of the Church in Wales, it was felt that the work could be carried out efficiently by one bishop, but four bishops were not sufficient for the work at the present day (hear, hear). He thought it was a good practical illustration of the times that the bishops could not cope with the work before them, and must have assistants. He had also the toast of the clergy. If no bishops were present they had those next to bishops. They had one who represented the light hand of the It Bishop-the Dean of St. Asaph (cheers). He saw present canons residentiary and non-residentiary, vicars, rectors, and so on. That year bad been one of trial and misfortune to them, and by many patiently and nobly borne, sometimes even in obloquy and reproach, and he asked all present publicly to express their sympathy with those clergy who were still suffering, and that it would be shortly brought to an end, and that very soon, when that time of trial would be a thing of the past. He coupled with the toast the name of the Dean of St. Asaph, who bad taken the lead in the claims of tbe clergy in the Principality (hear, bear). The Rev. John Owen (Dean of St. Asaph), who was loudly cheered, said it was hardly necessary to return thanks to a company of Churchpeople for loyally receiving the toast of the bishops and clergy of Wales. Loyalty needed no thanks. The painful adversity through which the Church in Wales had for some years been called upon to pass had at last a good effect, and it was no exaggeration to call a precious jewel a welding of bishops, clergy, and lay- men together into closer solidarity. The consecra- tion of two Welsh bishops in London on Tuesday, naturally prominent in the assembly's thoughts, reminded them of the arduous and trying duties— more trying now than ever—which rested upon the bishops of Wales. The bitter attacks recently made upon Welsh bishops by the opponents of the Church were really an involuntary tribute of fear and respect, and only served to endear them more than ever to Churchpeople for their courage in stepping into the breach. (Applause.) He wished to follow the wholesome precedent observed always on Degree Day, avoiding subjects of party controversy. It was, strange to say, a controversy whether a portion of the tithe now legally belonging to the clergy was originally given to the Church or to the nation. He was not going to deliver an elementary lecture on history, but it was not a matter of controvery at all that tithe, whether it belonged to the Church or the nation, did not belonged to farmers or landowners, and yet Welsh farmers had been incited systematically for years to filch into their own pockets that which not a single person in Wales of any intelligence cared to say belonged to him. The public had waited a long time for some hint about the opinion of Welsh Nonconformists as to the morality of tithe-grabbing. Great assemblies came and went many times a year, solemn resolutions were passed on all sorts of subjects, but on the burning question of the hour, which touched deeply the morality of Wales, Nonconformist leaders had not a syllable of guidance to offer to their people. The Welsh clergy had borne persecution with mar- vellous patience, and, therefore, well deserved the sympathy and support of laymen. It was pleasant to pass from that disgrace to Welsh religion to a matter on which at present he was glad to see that Welshmen of all parties were able to co- operate. Wales showed signs of bestirring herself to make good use of the Intermediate Education Act. There were many questions, local, and general, in connection with intermediate education which required careful thought, but which he could not touch on that day. There was, however, one question of special importance to which he would like too take that opportunity of referring. He was glad to know that there was a growing feeling widespread in Wales that a great mistake was made when the Bible was excluded so generally from Welsh Board Schools. (Applause.) He earnestly trusted that those who believe in religious education among Nonconformists as well as Churchmen would speak out clearly and strongly in good time, and insist that no difficult detail should be allowed to vitiate the new system at the start by excluding from those schools the Book most interesting and most profitable of all books for learning both to young andold, and thai they would do their best to guard against the fatal impression being given to our boys and girls that one day in the week was enough for the study of the subject which was the most practical as well as the most precious of all. He was sure that Church- men were most anxious to co-operate with their Nonconformist brethren heartily and harmoniously for the educationof Wales. For that co-operation frankness from the very first was invaluable on both sides. He felt confident that he represented the feelings of the Welsh clergy when he said that they meant to do all they possibly could to secure fair and sound provision for religious teaching in the intermediate schools, and he trusted they would be supported by the public opiniou of Welsh Nonconformity. (Applause.) Professor Scott briefly proposed The Health of the Examiners," coupling with the toast the name of Mr Watson, who, in a rather humorous speech, dwelt upon the fact that the Lampeter men were too much pressed with work, and as he expressed it, they had too many eggs in one basket." He knew he had disappointed some, and he could not but feel that he came there like an executioner (laughter), but it was the examiners' duty that they should do so, as it would be no use placing them in first-class, thus making them believe that when they tried they would be certain of first class in any of the Universities, which they would certainly not be. The result of cramming was that too much attention was paid to insignificant mea- sures. He also said that they had too many words to one idea. Good stuff capable of being put in small parcels, and that was the failure of the papers. He would give them a useful tip," worth its weight in gold at an examination. It was this: The time you spend in reading the questions is not time lost. Professor Ryle, who was loudly cheered, said he came before them not as an examiner he was standing there for the first time without his gown. When he came there first he came as an examiner, afterwards as their Principal, but he came then merely as their former Principal and friend and visitor (cheers); but he had not come alone, he had brought Mrs Ryle with him (loud cheers). It was his privilege only to be a short time in their midst, and he bad to accuse them. old and young, for having entered into a conspiracy against them two, as they all succeeded in making them leave that place with the memory of it deeply engraved in their hearts. They refused to recognise his and Mrs Ryle's inexperience, but only insisted that they should be their friends (laughter), and when they said good-bye, they took away sweet recollections which would always be dear to them. Turning to other matters, he said it was not the personal element that tested the prosperity and welfare of that great institution the machinery had been going, and going well, for many years past, and so long as they were ready to take the work set by the masters, the College would continue to progress. He had heard during the last two-and-a-half years from several persons how unanimously they had spoken in testimony of the warmest praise and surest confidence of the work done in their midst, and he came there for the first occasion to give them his congratulations on all sides (hear, hear). He was standing there to fulfil a duty of proposing a toast, he was sure they would receive with enthusiasm, "The old Members and Graduates of the College." There were some present who were at the College in, what may be called, the pre- historic times (laughter), and, as they knew, the clouds were only there then waiting for the sun to break through, and whatever difficulties there might be in the old times had been washed away (hear, hear), and he felt sure it was as much their distinction and pride to wear the gown as to be a member of that College. Concluding, he said that amongst the old members and graduates with whom the toast was associated, he had specially to record the names of the Revs. T. J. Bowen, H. L. Davies, B.D., and F. D. Pierce, B.A., all of whom returned thanks. Professor Walker proposed Schools of Wales," coupling with it the name of the Rev Llewelyn Edwards, Ardwyn School, Aberystwyth, who said that he would say very little, but he wculd make the statement that he was a Calvinistic Methodist (hear, hear), and he would like to tell them why. It was not on account of the prejudice which the Dean of St Asaph referred to, but that his great grandfather was kicked out by the then Bishop of St. Asaph. But he hoped that the bishops of the present day were wiser (hear, hear). He, as a Welshman, rejoiced in the success of an institution, which had for its object the amelioration and the good of the Celtic race in Wales (hear, hear), and since they had a college at Lampeter let it be a success, and that was not the only effort made for the education of the country, as they had heard there were now efforts going on of bringing Intermediate Education into active operation. There were obstacles in the way, still he hoped that all would try to further the objects in view, as a Welshman first, and as a Churchman after. "Visitors" was given by Professor Wade, to which Archdeacon Hilbers, St. David's, responded. Rev Canon Gregory Smith proposed "The Prosperity of Lampeter College," and Professor Williams answered in a suitable speech, which we are unable tc report from want of space. He touched upon the unique priveleges Lampeter had as a centre for an Intermediate school. A very hearty three cheers for the Principal brought a pleasant meeting to a close.

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LLANDILO CHRONICLE.

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THE COLLEGE SCHOOL, LAMPETER.

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