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I REVIEW OF THE BRITISH CORNI…

MARKETS.I

TIDY FARMING.

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TIDY FARMING. A Scottish landowner has taken the initiative in a most laudable work. He (Mr. Finlay, of Aberlour, Strathspey) has intimated that he will offer three prizes-L5, .£3, and L2-per annum for the next five years for the best-kept farm steadings; within the districts embraced by the Spey. Avon, and Fiddochside Farmers' Club. Mr Finlay recently purchased an estate- largely agricultural—on the banks of the Spey. Energetic and public-spirited to a degree, he is obviously to prove an acquisition to the district. Though not a practical agric- ulturalist, he seems to have pretty sensible notions of how a farm should be managed. In the selection of the Farm steading" as a benefitting subject of competition he has hit upon one of the weakest and most neglected sections of the average farm. Nor is this weakness peculiar to Strathspey. Mr Finlay might have with equal appropriate- extended his timely incentive to tidiness over the United Kingdom. Of course, some farms are better conducted than others, and, perhaps, leave little to be desired in the neat- ness of the steading or anything else. Many there are, however, in England, as well as in Scotland, which would greatly benefit, in appearance at least, from a little closer atten- tion to home details. Keeping the steading tidy does not cost the farmer- anything. It is quite as easy to have everything neat and tidy, as it is to heedlessly leave it unkempt. It may be supposed that continuous atten- tion to the steading is unnecessary and waste- ful. It is neither the one nor the other. There is positively profit in it, inasmuch as such attention is conducive, not merely to the durability of the buildings, but also the comfort of animals, the saving of fodder, and the proper utilisation of manure. Moreover, it has a moral influence upon the farmer, which the most unsentimental will readily admit. If a farmer keeps his steading neat and trim, it will inspire him with ambition to make his fields look well also, which is of course the true symbol of good husbandry. But the responsibility of keeping the steading tidy does not lie altogether with the farmer. If the buildings are defective or dilapidated, as they often are, it is difficult to make them tidy looking. At any rate, there is little pleasure in doing it, and before land- owners accuse their tenants of slovenliness, they would do well to consider whether they themselves are not in some measure account- able therefor. There is no excuse for the tenant who is well accomodated with farm buildings having everything topsy-turvy at any time of the year, but where the steading is unsatisfactory one can readi!y conceive that there is little encouragement to give it much attention. Mr Finlay's scheme, however, has our fullest sympathy. It is worthy of imitation. If it is succescful, as doubtless it will be, in bringing about an improved condition of matters on the farm, an excellent effect will be fully accomplished. We commend it to the consideration of the patrons of local agric- ultural societies on this side of the Border. Farmers are not ill to please as a rule with their buildings, which we think is a great mistake. Every farm should be fitted with good comfortable office-houses, and very possible encouragement should be given to keeping them well and their surroundings tidy. 0

LOCAL FAIRS FOR AUGUST.

STANDING JOINT COMMITTEES.

INFANT INSURANCES.

THE TONGUE.

LEWIS .MORRIS TO LORD TENNYSON.

"SNATCHED FROM THE JAWS OF…

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