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MUTUAL HELP. -..-.~

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MUTUAL HELP. It has often been said that farmers are slow in combining to promote their own peculiar interests. They are certainly less active than could be desired in discussing difficulties and subjects of interest which arise in connection with the practical work in which they are engaged. In farm practice many knotty points crop up which, to the farmer who has observed or has to face them for the first time, may present rather stubborn obstacles, and cause no little trouble, all of which might be considerably modified if not entirely averted by a friendly suggestion from one who had before passed through similar experience. The farmer must, all through his farm-life, be a student of nature, must watch her many moods, and so be ever ready with such efforts and measures as are calculated to ensure the fullest return of nature's bounty. The infinite variety of natural phenomena in farm life is at once the most fascinating and most perplexing feature in the farmer's calling. One season differs from another, one field presents a striking contrast to its lneiglibour, Jone animal thrives and pays under certain treatment, and another treated similarly does neither; all through the routine of farm life there is endless vari- ation. In such a calling the wisdom of experience is of special value. The young generation of farmers may learn much from the older; perhaps at times the older may gather useful hints from the younger. There are in every district of the country some who have had exceptional opportunities, and possess peculiar facilities for acquiring fresh experience and information of a kind likely to benefit their brother farmers. Therejis amongst farmers a gratifying amount of the spirit. of enquiry. More of thisitoo there might be with advantage undoubtedly. But what is more immediately wanted is less reticence, more readiness in disseminating and discussing the information and experience which. the more observing farmers have come to possess. There are different methods by which this interchange of experience might be accom- plished. The farmer's paper should be a use- ful agent in this work. We always- give a kindly welcome to a word of experience from a practical farmer, and are happy to say that we recognise a growing appreciation of the means of inter-communication thus provided, Agricultural discussion societies ought to be numbered by hundreds. There should be one in every important district. In what way could a body of farmers, young and old, spend a more profitable or more enjoyable evening than in discussing questions of interest and of difficulty arising in and and affecting their daily duties ? Politics should be kept at a distance. Within the domain of practical agriculture there is a wide and inviting field for discussion and invest- igation. The programme need not be a formidable one. A well-prepared paper by a well-informed man would be a good thing now and again,. but this should not be all, perhaps, not even the main feature in the programme. A useful discussion may be introduced by a very few remarks, and in this way valuable information may often be elicited.

HARVEST PROSPECTS.

I'THE WELSH SUNDAY-CLOSING…

GLAMORGANSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL.

CALVINISTIC WELSH METHODISM.

AN INTERESTING LETTER.

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