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A Tremendous Risk.

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A Tremendous Risk. Aid. W. R. K. Mainwaring on the Irish Question. GOVERNMENT CLINGING TO OFFICE. The yearly assembly of the St. Asaph Habitation of the Primrose League took place on Saturday, when a largely increased membership was reported, and officers for the ensuing year were chosen as follows:— Ruling councillor, Lieut.-Colonel P. R. Johnston, C.M.G. dame president, Mrs. Robert Williams-Wynn, Dolben; secretary, Miss Johnston; assistant secretary, Miss Graves. A public meeting followed under the pre- sidency of Colonel Johnston, and the speeches made dealt mainly with the Ulster question. The Chairman said it was monstrous to attempt to traffic with a body of people like the people of Ulster as the Government were endeavouring to do, and if they were wise they would strive to preserve the unity of the Empire. SINGLE-CHAMBER RULE. Alderman W. R. K. Mainwaring said that what had led to the present grave situation in regard to Ireland was the fact that the country at the present moment had only one effective governing chamber. The live and operative House of Lords, which existed primarily not to resist the work of the peo- ple, but to give the people a chance of say- ing whether they had been right or wrong, had gone, and to the country's great detri- ment the House of Commons had absolute and unfettered power. He prayed, how- ever, that that state of affairs was only tem- porary. He could give a list of Cabinet Ministers, from Mr. Asquith downwards, who never mentioned the question of Home Rule in their election addresses, and it was only when they saw which way the cat was going to jump at the last election that they began to trim their sails and to call to mind that there was such a thing as the Home Rule question. A PITIABLE SPECTACLE. Mr. Gladstone, when confronted with what Mr. Asquith was confronted with to- day, resorted to the alternative of consult- ing the people through the veto of the House of Lords, but Mr. Asquith, though knowing well that the country was against Home Rule, sought to keep in office by gerryman- dering a Constitution that had been the envy and pattern of every civilised nation in the world, with the result that the coun- try had the pitiable spectacle of the Govern- ment dragging out the dregs of a miserable existence. The cry for Home Rule had lost all that ever made it a cry, Ireland's lot to- day being far happier than ever before; and it seemed to him (the speaker) a very cheeky request to put Home Rule forward now, es- pecially accompanied by such demands as were made upon the financial resources of this country. Through Home Rule they would run a tremendous risk of Ireland be- coming tremendously sympathetic and active- ly opposed to this country at some time.

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