Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

32 articles on this Page

r ,NAVAL -DISASTER.

News
Cite
Share

r ,NAVAL DISASTER. BRITISH CRUISER RAMMED. EXCITING RESCUES. The Admiralty issued on Sunday the roi-I lowing statement: "Wilson line steamer Sappho, of Hull, "Was in collision with his Majesty's second- class cruiser Sappho, last night, in a dense ,fog off Dungeness "Merehant steamer uninjured, and pro- deeded on her voyage. No Uvea lost, nor anyone injured. y oe "Damage to his Majesty's ship Sappho necessitated her being grounded; in Dover Harbour. Salvage operations have com- menced, and no difficulty is anticipated in floating her." This unadorned official statement covers a. markable story of disaster, seamanship^ aoid heroism. cruiser, which belongs to the Speciaf Reserve, and is attached to the Home Fleet, left Portsmouth at six o'clock on Saturday nioraing to- take part in the manoeuvres. With a crew of over 270 hands, many of whom were Royal Naval Reserve men, she pan into a very thick fog on Saturday night. Her syren was kept going continuously, and the ship was making very slow progress in the neighbourhood of Dungeness Point when suddenly a big vessel loomed up out of the fog alarmingly close. It is stated that noth- ing could then have averted the colli- sion, and the vessel, crashed into the cruiser on the port side. This was about half-past i nine o'clock, and all the men not on watch had turned.into their hammocks. The cruiser was struck in a vital part- near.the engine-room, a big breach being: made below the water-line in the stokehold, into which water rapidly- poured. An alarm was immediately sounded throughout the warship. The men were piped to quarters, the collision doors were closed and collision mats placed in position over the breach. The coolness and pluck displayed by the crew were worthy of the Br itish Navy. They were as cool as if they wre on parade in harbour, instead of on a sinking ship, walled round with a thick veil of fog. Orders were obeyed with smartness and alacrity, and the discipline wasmagnifi- C.,n + The ship's, peril was extreme, as it was soon apparent that the water was gaining .ith great rapidity, and the vessel was threatening to sink. The waiter had" almost immediately flooded the engine-room and extinguished the fires, so that the cruiser was quite helpless. To make matters worse, there Was no steam power for the dynamos, and the electric light all over the ship went out, leaving the -crttiser in darkness. She was also t unable to "UtMise her wireless' telegraphy apparatus in p order to summon assistance, owing to the <1vpamos becoming inoperative. In the conditions it was decided by Commander ChHstiivn that the men should take tS the boats. They were mustered on deck, life- belts were served out, and the men were, ordered to enter the boats. Perfect order and discipline were again shown in carrying; out this order. The boats remained along- lSid.ertllie sinking vessel. THE WOMEN OF DUNGENESS. In the meantime the firing of the cruiser^ distress guns had been heard at -Dungehess, where lileboatmen and coastguards turned1 out most praiseworthy promptitude to Ianneh--the two local lifeboats. Many of the regular < life boatmen were away at sea, but volunteers took their places. From the life- boat houses to the point at which the boats "Could be launched is some distance across the beach, and dragging the heavy craft over:! 18 an exhausting task even for men. The- oqlen of Dungeness pluckily, took their a.longsi<l<! the, IllçnUl the arduous It was. greatly due to their aid that the /ifeboats were able to get away so Promptly to the aid of. the sinking .cruiser. In the fog and darkness the only thing to guide the lifeboats -to the position of the damaged cruiser was the continued firing 'of the minute gun, and, although a very keen look out was kept, the lifeboats were close hpon the Sappho before they caught sight of her. She was, very deep in the water, and appeared in such a condition that she Bright founder at any .moment. Most of the cruiser's crew were in the ship's boats, as. a to&tter of precaution. "V e By means of the lifeboats, the bo'afe of the bruiser, and steam launches, about 200 of the crew were landed safely at Dungeness, the, Remainder being left in their boats alongside the cruiser, some of the officers remaining on 'board that vessel. u THE CRUISER SAVED. A message from Dungeness to Dover for tugs resulted in three being sent. The Sappho had sunk to the level with her top range of portholes and close to the decks lvlxen, they arrived, and there appeared very little prospect of saving her. A1 hawser was put aboard- the sinking ship, jand the tugs commenced to tow her towards Dover. The cruiser was undoubtedly saved from founder- ing by the arrival of the tug Lady Crun- afili, which put on board powerful salvage Plant, pumping 800 tons of water an hour. Captain Lambert lashed his tug alongside the Jinking cruiser for pumping purposes, whilst r18-* other two tugs towed. Seamen stood by e Lady Crundall to cut the ropes in case 1. cruiser's bulkhead should hurst and cause l to sink. j. *■' was a tedious process, but Dover was a°hed in safety at last,' the" cruiser taking ground on th# east side of the Prince of ales' Pier, and not far from the shore. The ,c^age to the cruiser was of a very peculiar «aracter. Above the water-line scarcely Anything was perceptible except an indenta- Ion of the plates where the steamer had Pa ntly struck a glancing blow, but when the divers were sent down it was found there "as an extensive, breach entirely below the ^ater-line, extending 8ft. in depth and 4ft. in Mdth. It is a curious coincidence that the vessel s "ich collided with the Sappho bore the name, being the Wilson liner Sappho. 0ne, was but slightly damaged, and .proceeded yage. BOAT'S CREW PICKED UP. '1'' Crew 0l,g^ it was at first reported that all the 9f the Sappho had been safely landed at incorrect, for a boat's crew for 16 Master-at-Arms remained unaccounted UE.ti] Monday evening, when a large steam- Flamborough Head that she had ^OarH "S3X complement of the cruiser on tjj > having picked them up in the Channel. Carets Procoedod °h her course north-

[No title]

ARTILLERYMAN'S SUICIDE.

AIRSHIP STOPPED BY POLICE.

:.'MIXERS' WAGES. '.

-972,000 .WILL.

DAMAGES FOR A SIGNALMAN.

[No title]

. HASTES OF GUNNERY.

A TRIUMPH OF HEREDITY.J

THE AUSTRALIAN CAPTAIN.

'A METHODIST KNIGHT.

A MILLIONAIRE WHIP.

,BRITISH MUSEUM DIRECTOR.

■THE LAST WRANGLER.

[No title]

RECOVERED AFTER 150 YEARS.

A LOVER OF ANIMALS.

INQUEST IN A GARDEN. i

CORK STRIKE RIOTS,

.A TERRIBLE EXPERIENCE.|

DRAMATIST'S SUICIDE.

[No title]

PARLIAMENTARY PARS

BURIED IN A JAR.

-----------WIRELESS DEATH.

A LIVERPOOL MYSTERY.

LADY'S TEPvBIBLE ORDEAL.'

STRANGE COINCIDENCES.

CHAUFFEUR COMMITTED.

[No title]

GIRL FOUND MURDERED.