Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

29 articles on this Page

OUR LONDON LETTER. .

News
Cite
Share

OUR LONDON LETTER. fFrom Our Special Correspondod.) There have been many notable Imperial gatherings in London in recent years, but none of greater importance or more far- reaching possibilities than that of represen- tatives of the Press of the Empire, which was inaugurated by a banquet at the White City on Saturday night. The Press has come to its own in these days, and its power and influence are realised by everybody. The editors and newspaper men now meeting in London have come from the four corners of the earth, from the outposts to the centre of the Empire, and they represent a force of public opinion such as could not be embodied in any other gathering of Imperial dele- gates. Said Lord Rosebery in his great speech on Saturday: "The power of a great newspaper with a double function of guiding and embodying the public opinion of the pro- vince over which it exercises its influence is immeasurably greater than that of the statesman." It is a fine thing for the Empire that these "able editors" from Canada, Australasia, and India should come and confer with their brethren of the pen at home on matters of Imperial importance, to meet public men of all political parties, to make friendships, and- get to understand one another's points of view. The social side of the conference is not by any means the least important, and the journalists of the old country will see to it that the visitors are enabled to spend an enjoyable time. But there is serious busi- ness to be done as well, and the main object of the delegates to the conference is to confer. One of the topics, which would seem comprehensive enough to cover the whole, is "The Press and the Empire." Cables and cable charges, and the organisation of news services are matters of special importance. Many misunderstandings, more or less serious, have had their origin in the trans- mission to the Dominions of condensed re- ports of important news and speeches, which would never have arisen if full accounts could have been cabled. It is quite certain that the conference will do all that lies in its power to secure a reduction in the charges in order that the news service may be ren- dered as full and authentic as circumstances may require. The defence of the Empire, and the service which the Press can render in that connection, will also provide plenty of matter for discussion. Members of the House of Commons appear to have found the Whitsuntide recess too brief. At any rate, the majority have shown no particular eagerness to get back to duty. The arduous business of the Session begins this week, however, and the Finance Bill, -which has been printed and published, Is likely to swallow up a good many other measures. It is certainly a formidable busi- ness, and the prophets are pessimistic about the amount of Parliamentary time which will have to be expended before it is finally disposed of. The Government hope to pass the Bill through the Commons with all pos- sible speed, but even then it cannot reach the Lords before August, while the opinion is pretty confidently expressed that it will be a good deal later before their lordships get a chance at it. It may be that the Commons will still be talking about the Budget in October. If that should be the case several other measures of importance will have to walk the plank. It is to be hoped that the nation is grateful to the anonymous benefactor-a lady-who has come forward at the last moment to pre- vent the famous Holbein picture from taking a trip abroad. Probably, however, the nation is not very much excited about it. The public declined to subscribe very largely on its own account, at any rate, for appar- ently the general contributions up to date have only amounted to something like £ 15,000. Enthusiasm in these matters is, after all, confined to a few people, and the majority, in spite of the fuss made by some newspapers, would be almost unmoved if a syndicate of American millionaires were to buy up all the privately-owned art treasures in the country. The coldness with which the appeal for funds for the purchase of the Nor- folk Hoibeiu was received will, at all events, not encourage the making of similar appeals in future. » Though the London Elections Bill has passed its second reading, its chance of pass- ing into law must be considered very remote. It was brought in by Mr. Harcourt, the First I "Commissioner for Works, whose Plural Vot- ing Bill was thrown out by the House of Lords. It seems more than likely that the new bill for London will share the same fate. Its rejection was moved in the Commons on the ground that it is not accompanied by pro- visions for a redistribution of seats, gives no Temedy for existing anomalies in representa- tion, besides having, its opponents say, quite a number of defects of its own. The object of the measure is to make London one parlia- mentary borough of which the existing boroughs, or divisions would be single-mem- ber divisions, with the exception of the City, which would return two members as at pre- sent. The effect of such a bill becoming law, would be that a voter would not lose his vote by removing to another part of London, and plural voting would be made impossible. There can be no doubt that the Red Man spectacle is. one of the best things ever seen at Earl's Court. Here are all the joys of our youth-.branes and bronchos, mustangs and mocassins, feathers and war paint, and I scalps, to say nothing of wigwams, squaws, and papooses. The key note of the whole spectacle is realism, and it is an exceedingly picturesque and fascinating picture of life on the plains of the far west. The Black Hawk massacre is one of the most thrilling I bits of realistic drama ever seen in this country. It is all very interesting, and the guests at the Press garden party, who spent a pleasant time at the invitation of Mr. Henry J. Thompson, found it so. But the Red Man's Camp is only one of the numerous attractions at Earl's Court. "The Deluge" and "The Destruction of San Francisco" are very remarkable spectacular productions. And there are many other things worth seeing, besides a very interesting Exhibition i and delightful grounds. A. E. M. I <

[No title]

J STATE INSURANCE

LUCKY BILL.

MYSTERY OF MAJOR'S DEATH,

THE SUITOR'S SUIT.

[No title]

Two Escapes of a Charming…

..:.:::",:,:,..u.':.t..r:zut8O!i"'J-w:;,¡¡JJ:;I,:";::.;…

I— MADMAN IN A CHURCH.

[No title]

Advertising

DERBY DAY FRAUD.I I -0

j WOMAN STOWAWAY.

INEW RAILWAY BOON.

------------------VAN DEN…

"'TIS TRUE, 'TIS PITY."

TAKE THIS TO DAY ]

[No title]

[No title]

--DARING BANK FRAUD.

ENGLISH GOLFERS WIN,

■J LIBELLING AN M.P.

; MR. GRAYSON'S NECKTIE.

[No title]

CRUISER ON THE GOODWINS.

I ,ATLANTIC MYSTERY.

HUSBAND'S HEROISM.

----------_----------FATAL…