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< CLUB WINDOW. 9' Yr. Samuel Hordcn, i' who has offered 110,000, and another £ i0,000 if necessary, towards the cost of building an Australian Dreadnought, is1, perhaps, the richest man in [Australia. His grandfather was but a poor emigrant, whose passage out is said to have ijeen paid for him. 1 It is related that- when Lord Dalmeny was la. boy he was severely taken to task by the Duchess of Cleveland, who disliked demo- cratic ways, because he signed himself in her birth-day book as "Archie Primrose." Lord Rosebery, who was standing by, said, "Why, mother, the boy is Archie Primrose, isn't he? But the old lady would have her way. "You nave your views and I have mine," she replied. "I am of an older school which does not approve of such mat- ters." She told the boy that he should sign himself" Archibald, Lord Dalmeny." There lives in Berlin a man who has had both lege, and both :arms amputated, not- withstanding which he is able,, by means of ingenious supplementary devices, to mount stairs without a stick in normal fashion, and to sit down, walk, eat, dress, and undress unaided. At a certain West-end theatre, during the run of a successful comedy, the leading man was compelled, through illness, to give notice that he would be absent for a night or two. Delighted at the chance of shining in the leading role, the understudy went to the ro-etaxest telegrapli-offloe,' and seht signed toessages all over London to authors and managers, saying: "I shalh play A's part to- night. Mr. J. M. Barrie acknowledged the information by telegraphing back to him nt once: "Thanks for the warning.—;J. M. BARBIE." '"Grasp opportunity and put it in your pocket," is the favourite motto of Sir Thomas Dewar, who early in life, long be- fore he became connected 'with 'the famous Whisky which bears his name, started in business at home as a rat-killer. A penny for each tail produced as evidence of his skill was the rate of payment allowed, and Sir j.iiomas has since confessed that he earned a good deal of pocket-money at the .business. •" # Prince Edward of Wales is said to be not very fond of lessons,. arithmetic being e-spe- cialj.y distasteful to him. His tutor used frequently to make him stand in the corner" wlien the little Prince did his sums wrong. Oieday our future King, when he saw the arithmetic books being brought out, said in a very quiet voice, "Oh, please, I don't think I'll do arithmetic to-day. I'll go in the cor- ner instead, if you don't mind." The Rev. Dr. Cameron Lees, one of the most popular ministers, in Edinburgh, once had the unique experience of preaching to ja congregation of one. This happened half a century ago, when he was appointed to the parish church of Carnock, in Ross-shirei A heavy snowstorm! prevented the worshippers reaching the church, and the worthy clergy- man-delivered a most eloquent sermon, with the old beadle as his -only listener. If it. "From the cdtttity of broad acres and cricketers comes Mr. Alfred Austin,: the Poet Laureate, who has just celebrated his "seventy-fourth birthday. Mr. Austin's latest appearance in public was' in connection with] the celebration of Shakespeare's birthday. On this occasion, the Poet Laureate recited the verses he had written for the event. j Edison is deaf, but the affliction is not one .of the worries- of -the. great inventor, 'T!li' loss of hfu liefcrifig vvfis oa titled by a 'man who lifted him out of a chair when he was a 'boy by the ears. This foolish proceeding brofie both drums. Curiously enough he is fond of going to the theatre, although he ( cannot hear a. word that is said, King Edward's nearest personal giiard is the Hon. Corps, of Gen tiemen-at-Arms. It' is composed entirely of officers who have, seen active service, all under fifty years of age at the time of appointment. His Majesty personally selects them, and they are called upon for duty on the, occasion of all Courts ceremonies in London or at Wndsor, but are. never taken out of England. The captain of the corps receives £ 1,200 a year. The Mosque of Eyoub, where Mohammed V. was invested with the sword of Osman, is j ■:> sometimes- termed the Westminster Abbey of Turkey," for within dts walls all save one or two- of the long line of Ottoman Sultans have undergone the ceremony which corre- sponds to coronation. The Mosque, though J Pflt .large, is a magnificent example of Orien- tal architecture, built of white marble and decorated with Persian tiles. It is esteemed' the no lies t Mussulman temple in Europe, and remains to this day untrodden by non- Moslem, feet. 4 Bucknam Pasha, the Turkish Admiral and aide-de-camp to the Sultan, is an American. He was sent to Constantinople in charge of a new vessel, constructed for the Turkish 3iavy. At the end of the voyage he so won the regard of the ruler that he was at once taken into the Turkish naval service. M Abdul Hainid II. is a Very keen photo- grapher, but, 'as the Mussulman is not sup- posed to take likenesses of human beings, he confines himself to, photographing landscapes and buildings. He is the, possessor of what is probably the most expensive camera in the world.. It was- made for''him- by • an American firm, and all the metal work is 'of pure gold, while those portions which in an ordinary camera are of wood are constructed of the finest 'ivory. r Mr. Pett Ridge delights in telling of an Z) episode which took place just after the South African war. A solder was relating to a. Crowded carriage his experiences at, the frdrit. "Yes," he cpneluded, "we vfere fight* ing from daybreak till ten o'clock at night." At that point an .old farmer from the north broke in: "It seems all right, but there is one thing' I do not understand about that story," he ventured. "How did you manage about dinner? Sir William Arrol is one of the most re- markable self-made and self-taught men who have hailed from North of the Tweed. lie. started life, in a cotton-mill at eleven, years of age, but the work in the mill did not suit him at all. "I wanted an easier life," he explained later, "so I went to work for a blacksmith in Paisley," and-it was that -clang of the anvil and the. sight of the sparks which inspired him with that love of engi- neering which led him to become the world's 'greatest bridge-builder. Mr. W. P. Frith, the veteran R.A., once entered a picture-dealer's shop, and, notic- ing a portrait of himself, turned to the woman behind the counter and asked: "Whose likeness is that?" "That," said the lady, "ie a portrait of the celebrated artist Frith, painted by himself." "Hum said Mr. Frith, pretending to examine the picture. "What is the price?" "Twenty pounds." "Surely that is a stiff price?" the artist said. "Well," said the woman, "you see, it's very valuable, because the artist is deceased"Deceased!" exclaimed the as- tonished Frith. "Yes, sir. Died of drink.1 He was dreadful Frith was. Well, my bus- hand used to see him when he was doing his painting, always more or less in liquor." ■' j

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