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+» THB residual good latent in coal-tar is almost fabulous. Coal-tar ia now a good substitute for quinine in typhus and intermittent fever; it is also a remedy for rheumatism. But what would the trade say to a good tea infused from coal-tar ? A German chemiat recently told his class that this is possible. When tea has been distilled from the bye- products of a gas retort the chemist will perforce succeed in making coffee, and possibly snuff and tobacoo generally. TIm Swedish peasantry explain the lunar spots as representing a boy and girl bearing a pail of water between them,\whom the moon once caught up in her horns, and carried of finto the heavens; a legend current also in Icelandic mythology. A German tale says that a man and a woman stand in the moon, the man because he strewed briars one Sunday morning ia the ehurch-path, the woman for making butter on .the same day. The Dutch have it that the unhappy man was caught stealing vegetables. The natives of Ceylon have a hare, instead of a man, in the moon, the hare having achieved that high honour by jumping into a fire to roast himself for the benefit of Buddah. The Chinese represent the moon by a rabbit pounding rice in a mortar. Their mytho- logical moon is figured by a beautiful young woman, with a double sphere behind her head, and a rabbit at her feet. An Australian legend says the moon was a native oat, who fell in love with someone else's wife, and was driven away to wander ever since. Among the Esquimaux the sun is a maiden and the moon is her brother; and the Khasias of the Himalaya say that the moon falls every month in love with his mother-in-law, who throws ashes in his face, whence his spots. The Malays believe that the moon is a woman, and the stars are her children. TWO O'CLOCK OF THB MOKNING" COURAGIL-)Ir. Brassey was gifted with much presence of mind. The first Napoleon used to say of himself that few men were his equals in what he was wont to call "two o'clock of the morning" courage, which is in fact preasnce of mind on the announcement of unexpected danger and difficulty. Mr. Brassey was fortunate enough to possess this two o'clock in the morning" courage in a high degree. If called up suddenly in the middle of the night upon some urgent peril or difficulty, he met the alarm with perfect coolness; sat down to consider and calculate what was the best mode of obviating the danger (danger seemed to stimulate his faculties, and not to over. power them); and, before the break of day, when he had to proceed to the scene of action, was ready with his plan. It may be easily imagined what oonMence this presence of mind on the part of their employer infused into his principal agents and all those who were employed under him. Mr. Brassey had a perfect hatred of contention. This quality of mind was second only to his trustfulness, the main element ef his success. It was soon discovered by anyone who had dealings with him that, should any matter of controversy arise, he would not only refuse to take any questionable advantage over the other side, but would rather even submit to be taken ad- vantage of. Now, there is not a more fruitful virtue in the world than this kind of generosity. It is nearly sure to elicit a kindred response. In most in. stances where over-reaching is begun or continued it derives its strength from contentiousness.—^4!^ oj Thomas Brassey," by Sir Arthur Helps. TBOUBUS OF AN ENTBETAINEB.—I remember the difficulties of performing "Ages Ago" inl Clifton so weD. There was no dressing rooms in those days in the Small Hall of the Victoria Rooms. We had to go quite early, clamber on the platform with the aid of chairs, and dress behind the scenes as best we might. "Ages Ago" was a piece involving very quick changes of costume; how we did it I don't know I Then the boards of the platform were not allowed to'touch the walls by some three or four inches, and various small but necessary articles of apparel tumbled down between the boards and the wall, and had to be fished up from a dust-covered depth of three feet with a hooked stick. But things are- changed for the better now. Local authorities and proprietors have at length come to me conclu- sion that there are actors, singers, and entertainers who are used to some of the amenities of civilised life. They have at length grasped the fact that a zinc pail is not the pleasantest form of washing basin. I mention one seaside resort where we dressed in a small room off the taproom of a public house, where there was a bagatelle board. A very drunken fre. quenter of the taproom insisted on trying to come in and play bagatelle, and finding his efforts hopeless, revenged himself by abusing at us horribly through the keyhole. It is only about three years since a fashionable inland watering-place possessed no better room for entertainment than a hastily erected drill. shed. When our men arrived to put up the fit-up « for our performance they found the stage in posses- sion of one old hen, trying to pick up an honest living on the boards. The ladies had to dress in the gunroom, where there was an overpowering and sickening smell of Rangoon oil; we men dressed in a sort of outhouse where pigeons were kept, and look- ing on to the dustbin of the caretaker. The caretaker's wife had been boiling greens for dinner; I Bay no more. At Bournemouth some years ago we gave the entertainment in a riding schooL The men's dressing rooms were across the courtyard, I 1ras dressed as a stage parish beadle, artificially fattened (it was years ago !), and with a portentous red bulbous nose. In this costume, and by daylight, I had to run the gauntlet of all the grooms and stable helps. I have dressed in vestries of disused Methodist chapels, is made-up on the remains of the pulpit; dressed also in a cellar with an inch or two of water here and there on the Boor; andjat Dover, years ago, our dressing room was not a room, but a space of some six square feet, separated from the front row of stalls only by a thin piece of green baize. But things have improved so much now-a-days, and phiah and velvet reign in place of dirt and squalor, -a. CONug Grain, in Murray's Magaeine. A PAiNrui, PICTURB.-We might be tempted to condemn with the utmost severity such shameful dis. orders if we did not bear in mind the disastrous cir- cumstances amidst which Louis XV. was placed—an orphan from his cradle, a king when only five years old, trained by men who aimed rather at gaining 0ver him a personal inBuence than at forming his character and his morals, surrounded by a Court which, after the somewhat artificial austerity of the last years of Louis XIV., had given itself up during the Regency to every kind of, debauchery, married very young, and in some manner without his consent, to a princess older than himself, he was, besides, exposed to the most irresistible seductions. Religion still kept him in check, so, with the view of stifling his remaining scruples, the Duke de Richelieu, than whom no courier was more corrupt and more corrupting, was obliged, so they say, to encourage him to excesses of the table. He selected as an accomplice for that pur- pose Madame de Mailly as being capable of not frightening, either by too much boldness or by too much shyness, a prince still timid. Louis XV. (and this must be said to his credit) blushed at the bottom of his heart when he thought of the example he set to his kingdom. A very curious journal of hia illness at Metz tells us that in the crisis of his danger, and notwithstanding the dread he had of death, he declared that he did not wish to recover, ac- knowledging that he had badly governed his subjects and fgarine that he could not do better afterwards.

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