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----------FIELD AND FAR-kl.

WHEAT RUST. ,

INSANE PATIENTS AND CYCLING.|

DUMB ANIMALS' FRIENDS.

::ADMIRALTY AND WAR OFFICE.I

I WHERE ENGLISH TRADERS FAIL.

BEATEN BY BROTHER JONATHAN.

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-.......----r--------" , MUNIFICENT…

THE ASHFORD RAILWAY ,; accid^T..■…

"-.'i';.".."", A CYCLIST'S…

I■'■■' I'CURIOUS FACTS. :,;…

..-,. !THE SWEEPINGS. OF THE…

IIRON TELEGRAPH POLES.

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Ioi<-"'::-:--:."JR(IR"":.…

A MURDERER'S HONOUR,"

.['" ,.,tI THE HARBOUR OF…

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t THE HARBOUR OF SANTIAGO. Mr. James O'Kelly. M.P,, who was the special war correspondent of the New York Herold during the Insurrection in Cuba in 1873, and succeeded in pene- trating to the rebel lines when forbidden undor pain ;0f death to do so by the Spanish authorities, who on his return subjected him to a prolonged- and rigorous imprisonment, and actually sentenced him to death, gives a description of the forti&ation&-of, Santiago in the Dublin Daily Independent: My prison chamber (writes Mr. O'Kelly) was alongside the highest battery, whose gutts: were turned into the bay, so as to play upon any ship which might have succeeded in passing through the narrow channel which gives ingress into the bdy. Prom the platform of one of the upper batteries, where I was allowed to take my daily exercise, the whole seaward defence of the port came under my observation. From the waters edge battery rose above battery in a succession of huge steps cut out of the solid rock, and in front the Caribbean Sea lying under the golden sun like a huge turquoise that stretched into infinity. The American generals have lost their great chance. Had they seized Santiago on the outbreak of the war they would have paralysed Spain's resistance. But it now remains to be seen whether the Spaniards have not taken the ordinary precautions suggested by a state of war. There is not in the world a port more capable of defence than Santiago, and supposing that modern guns have been placed in- the batteries, it is difficult to see how any fleet could hope to force its way in. The most powerful ironclad, in an attack onthefprts, would not be much safer than a protected cruiser, because the higher batteries could play upon their decks, that is to say, on their weak point. Always assuming that the Spanish Government has ha'dtne very ordinary intelligence of supplying Santiago with modern artillery; the' work set out for the fleet to capture or destroy Admiral CerVera's Squadron is toore difficult 6f accomplishment than the Secretary for the American navy seems to realise. It is not too much to say that should the forts, be armed with modern artillery, any attempt by the American fleet to force a passage must result in disaster. "Nor is it more probable that the American fleet can absolutely shut up the Spanish ^squadron in Santiago Harbour. The mouth of the harbour is like the neck of a bottle, and on either side rise up com- manding hills upon which are placed batteries more or less modern. No ship, no matter what her force, can approach these batteries without danger, always assuming that the old guns have been replaced by new. Even assuming that the Americannavy is suc- cessful in blockading Cervera in Santiago, it remains to be seen how they are going to clear the Spaniards out of the city. It. can only be done by landing troops.

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GARDENING GOSSIP.

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A RUN ON THE BANK.