Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

18 articles on this Page

THE LATE RIGHT HON. W. E.…

News
Cite
Share

THE LATE RIGHT HON. W. E. GLADSTONE. STATE FUNERAL IN WESTMINSTEB ABBEY. AN IMPRESSIVE CEREMONY. In accordance with the command of the Queen and in consonance with the request of both House: of Parliament, the remains of the Right Hon. Williarr Ewart Gladstone, who died at Hawarden Castle or the jnorning of Ascension Day, were given StatE Burid within the Northern Transept of the grand old Collegiate Church of St. Peter at Westminster on B&turday, May 28, amid the profound sorrow of a rut congregation representative in the fullest sense of all that is great and good in the land. ( SCENES AT WESTMINSTER. The morning had broken gloomily, but arounc Westminster Hall and the Abbey, by the time when Ordinary traffic was stopped by the authorities, a crowd had begun to collect of persons determined to obtain a post of vantage to witness the funeral pro- cession. Later the numbers largely increased, until the railings of New Palace-yard in Bridge-street became lined with spectators, and all the adjacent ■pace available to the general public was occupied. Strong bodies of police were drafted into the district from various parts of the metropolis. All the men were attired in their best uniforms, with white floves, and wore their Jubilee medals. So admirable were the police arrangements that no crush was experienced. All the roofs and windows of the surrounding buildings were filled with persons anxious to gain a glimpse of the arrival of the car- hages containing foreign Ambassadors and Ministers with their wives, and others who had been invited to tttend the ceremony. In New Palace-yard-where ft number of the tenantry and villagers from Hawar- len, who had arrived the previous day, stood under the trees, and were later to join in the procession- the scene was a most impressive one. By ten o'clock in the morning the Eton College volunteers, 350 itrong, had taken up position, the bells of all the shurches in the locality were tolling, and everyone was intently watching for the appearance of the lortige from Westminster Hall. 1ST THE GREAT IIALL. In the great Hall of Rufus at Westminster Hall, where the last night vigil had been maintained wound thecoffin of the illustrious dead, the central barriers erected for the lying in State had been re- moved, and soon after nine o'clock members of Par- liament and their friends began to assemble. Inside the Hall were to be seen the Rev. Stephen Gladstone, the Rev. Harry Drew, Dr. Dobie, the Bishop of Rochester, and the Dean of Lincoln, while Sir H. Campbell-Bannerman, Lord E. Fitzmaurice, Mr. Stuart Wortley, and Mr. John Burns and other familiar senators were also noticeable. In the adjoining House of Commons there was a large assembly of members, prominent among them being the Home Secretary, the Attorney-General, Lord Hugh Cecil, Sir Henry Fowler, Mr. T. P. O'Connor, Mr. Blake, and representatives of other sections. The scene in the Legislative Chamber became very animated about ten o'clock. The majority of the Ministers had arrived, including Mr. Chamberlain, the Home Secretary, the Secretary for India, Mr. Ritchie and others; while the ex- Ministers were headed by Sir W. Harcourt, Mr. J. Morley, and Sir H. Campbell Bannerman. Members of all sections of the House were in deep mourning. The Speaker, attired in full dress robes, entered the House of Commons shortly after ten, and a few minutes later, preceded by the Sergeant-at-Arms carrying the mace and followed by three clerks, proceeded to Westminster Hall. The procession of members was headed by the well-known figure of the Chancellor of the Exchequer and the veteran Sir John Mowbray. Then came the Secretary for the Colonies and the Home Secretary, next Sir William Harcourt and Sir Charles Dilke. The Peers began to assemble in their Chamber at a quarter to nine. The Lord Chancellor took his iieat on the Woolsack, and the House was opened after prayers, by which time there was a very full attendance, including 12 Bishops. At half-past ten the Lord Chancellor directed their lordships to form in line of fours, the Archbishop of York to follow him, and the peers to succeed in order of precedence. The procession left the House a quarter to eleven. Inside Westminster Hall a conspicuous group at this time were most of the members of Mr. Gladstone's last Ministry, who had walked down the Engway from the St. Stephen's end of the Hall and ey were joined by a number of members of the 'Corps Diplomatique, Baron de Staal noticeable among them. A few minutes later the deputation t,om Hawarden came into the hall, where presently they were joined by Mr. Herbert Gladstone. Lord Salisbury, accompanied by the Right Ron. A. J. Balfour soon after passed in. Just later the Prince of Wales followed, with the Duke of York the head of the procession—or rather that part of it composed of members of the House of Commons—made its way with solemn steps and plow down the middle of the Hall, led by Inspector Horsley. Now the oaken coffin, which had hitherto remained on the catafalque untouched, was prepared for removal by a number of attendants. As soon as the pall bearers were in position, the Bishop of London, standing behind the coffin, offered prayer, in which hearty thanks were given to Almighty God for the life of His servant, William Ewart Gladstone, whom He has been pleased to call from the troubles and toils of this world to the realms of eternal rest; adding, and grant as we commit his body to the ground, that our hearts and minds may be so moved by his long and manifold labours for the service of mankind, his country, and his Qneen, that we fail not to learn the lessons which fhon ever teachest Thy faithful people by the lives of those who love and serve Thee." THE PROCESSION. The Earl Marshal of England gave the sign for the coffin to be lifted. Eight stalwart men bore the heavy burden on their shoulders, and the chaste white gold-broidered pall having been placed over it, lie supporters took the places, on the right being the Prince of Wales, the Marquis of Salisbury, Mr. Balfour, the Duke of Rutland, Lord Rendel; and on the left the Duke of York, Earl of Kimberley, Sir W. Harcourt, the Earl of Rosebery, and Mr. G. Armitstead. The procession then moved on, Garter Principal King of Arms (represented byNorroy King lif Arms, bearing a white baton with gold ornamenta- tion) fell in behind, and then the mourners, first of whom walked the Rev. Stephen Gladstone. Behind him came Master W. G. C. Gladstone (the heir to the estate), Mr. Henry Gladstone and Mr. Herbert Gladstone, Rev. H. Drew, Masters Albert, Charles and Deiniol Gladstone, and other relatives of the deceased statesman. The rest of the procession was made up with the private secretaries of the de- Ceased, the servants, and the deputation from Hawarden. Slowly they passed into Palace-yard. Here the coffin was brought to the wheeled bier, drawn by two bay horses, and attended by liveried grooms. Solemn stillness prevailed as the cortege emerged from the gateway of Palace-yard and passed onward to the Abbey. Slowly it proceeded down St. Margareatreet, across Parliament-square, and by way of the Broad Sanctuary, and within a few minutes it had disappeared within the great west door of the ptately fane. Here follows, in official form, the complete order of the historic procession: Rouge Dragon Portcullis Pursuivant of Arms. Pursuivant of Arms. The House of Commons, in lines of four. Bluemantle Rouge Croix Pursuivant of Arm. Pursuivant of Arms. Privy Councillors not being members of either House cf Parliament, and exclusive of members of the last Ministry. Windsor Herald. Richmond Herald. The House of Lords (Exclusive of members of the late Ministry). Somerset Herald. York Hei-ald. Members of the late Ministry. Lancaster Herald. Clarenceux King of Arms. Representatives of Royal Personages (Foreign). Sir Robert Collins, K.C.B. (Representing her Royal Highness the Duchess 01 Albany). Colonel A. Collins, M.Y.O. (Representing her Royal Highness the Princess Louise, Marchioness of Lome). The Lord Monson, C.V.O. (Representing their- Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha). Representatives of Foreign Sovereigns. Hit Royal Highness Prince Christian of Schleswig. Holstein K.G. Hi8 Royal Highness the His Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge, K.G. Duke of Connaught, K.G. (Preceded by the Equerries to the Princes of the Blood Royal). The Earl of Pembroke, G.C.V.O. (Representing her Majesty the Queen). 1:0 The Earl Marshal. Supporters of the Pall. George Armitstead, Esq. The Earl of Rosebery, K.G. The Right Hon. Sir Wil- liamVernon Harcourt. The Earl of Kimberley, X.G. His Royal Highness the Duke of York, K.G. THE COFFIN. Supporters of the Pall. I ord Rendel. The Duke of Rutland, K.G. The Right Hon. Arthur James Balfour. The Marquis of Salis- bury, K.G. His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, K.G. Garter Principal King of Arms. (Represented by Norroy King of Arms). The Chief Mourner. The Relations and Private Friends of the Deceased, and Private Secretaries to the deceased during his late tenure of office as Prime Minister: Lord Welby, Sir Algernon West, Sir W. B. Gurdon, Sir Edward Hamilton, the Hon. Spencer Lyttelton, Sir Arthur Godley, Mr. Horace Seymour, Mr. Henry Primrose, Sir James Carmichael, Mr. George Leveson Gower, Mr. George Murray, and Mr. H. Shand. The Physicians to the Deceased. Servants of the Deceased. Deputation from Hawarden. The members of the Heralds' College who mar- shalled the procession all wore plain morning dress, their office and rank being only indicated by the wands they carried. INBmB TUB ABBBT. All the doors of the Abbey which had been desig- nated as entrances for the holders of tickets of ad- mission were thrown open by half-past eight in the morning, ._Slowly at first the mourners not having part in the procession filed into their places. All were attired in sombre black, save one or two ladies who had a touch of white in hat or bonnet, and a few very conspicuous notabilities whose robes of office, vestments, or head-dress carried colour, At half- past nine o'clock the seats which lined either side of the nave were crowded; while in the galleries 50 feet aloft hundreds of worshippers found places. At five minutes to ten the great West Door had been thrown open, and the State coaches of the Lord Mayor of London and the Sheriffs of the City had slowly drawn up, The City Remembrancer headed the procession, followed by Sheriffs Dewar and Frank Green in their robes of office. The Lord Mayor, attended by his chaplain and mace-bearer, wore a black robe, over which were placed his gold chains of office. They proceeded to their albttt d places, as did also the i ord Provost of Edinburgh and the Lord Mayor of Dublin. Sir Henry Irving, Sir Squire and Lady Bmcroft, Sir W. B. Richmond, R.A., and many other distinguished people found the seats reserved for vhem in due course. Meanwhilb the muffled bell of tile Abbey tower had begun to toll in mournful numbers. Scarcely had the sound of the passing- bell been heird before the members of the choir were =een to be moving from their vestry into the centre of the nave. The boys of theehoir wore their elaborate crimson-and-gold surplices, other choirs were dressed in purple, and yet others in black. They formed up into single file on either side of the nave. Beside the door were six Westminster Abbey alms- men, all old sailors or soldiers, wearing their quaint blue gowns. After the choristers came the clergy, who emerged from the Robing Room hard by and took their places on the side of the nave which had been appropriated to them. At their head stood the Archbishop of Canterbury, opposite to whom was the Dean of Westminster, while arranged on the other side were the Canons Residentiary and Minor of the Abbey, who were reinforced by three of their old colleagues in the persons of the Venerable Bishop of Durham (Dr. Wfestcott), Bishop Barry, and the Dean of Canterbury. XRS. GLADSTONE'S ARRIVAL. At a quarter past ten a carriage quietly drew up at the West Door, and before the officer in command of the Eton volunteers had time to call his boys to attention Mrs. Gladstone's face was seen at the car- riage window. All hats were lifted in silent sym- pathy. The venerable lady looked worn and pale; she was dressed in black, but there was no super- abundance of crepe, and leaning on the arm of her son, the congregation all rising, she moved slowly into the Abbey, followed by other lady members of the family, including little Dorothy Drew, whose golden hair showed bright upon her black frock and tiny cloak. THE TWO PRINCESSES. Just about half-past ten there was another stir among the youthful guard; they were called to atten- tion, and got the order, Royal Salute—Present Arms, and up drove a Royal carriage, its drivers in sober black in place of the usual scarlet. The Princess of Wales alighted, dressed all in black, with a long thin veil. With the Princess were the Duchess of York and Miss Knowles; they were con- ducted along the choir, past the standing people to the Dean's pew. FUNERAL MUSIC. Now the sound of mournful .nusic turned atten- tion to the east end of the Abbey, where high above the congregation four trombones were sounding out Beethoven's most exquisite and touching Funeral- Equale. This was followed by Schnbert'i Funeral March in B minor—again a piece of musical execu- tion of the most splendid order, for the organ, was assisted by orchestral accompaniment. While Sir John Bridge, however, was in the organ loft the choir was still standing in the aisle, and the clergy were awaiting the entry of the marshalled Pro- cession. THE PROCESSION ENTERS. Inspector Horsley now gave the signal that the House of Commons had arrived. Members of the front Opposition bench were necessarily absent from this portion of the ceremony, for they had to come later in a body by themselves as Mr. Gladstone's last Administration. The attendance of members was, however, so large that it took a long while to get into position, and all. the more familiar representatives of the people were readily recognised as they passed along. Next down the Nave came a goodly gathering of peers moving reverently to their places. Then fol- lowed the members of Mr. Gladstone's last Govern- mentandtherepresentativesof foreignSovereigns. Next came the Duke of Connaught, the Duke of Cam- bridge, and Prince Christian, and immediately after them Lord Pembroke as the special representative of the Queen. All these groups passed solemnly within the choir railings, the organ and orchestra playing the while the moving music of Beethoven's Funeral March in A flat Minor. The coffin was now at the door, and all eyes were eagerly turned thitherward. The Archbishop, the Dean, and the Sub-Dean moved to the open portal, the other clergy and the choristers formed fours, all turned eastward, and after the open- ing sentence of the solemn Service, I am the Resurrection and the Life, saith the Lord," had been repeated by the Dean, the choir took up the refrain, and that and the other sentences were sung to Dr. Croft's music as the coffin was carried to the choir gates, the pall-bearers being ranged on either side. There was abundant evidence of the deep feeling which had been aroused in the minds of this distinguished group, and not the least visibly affected were Sir William Harcourt and Lord Salisbury. Following the coffin was the Bishop of London. It was well-nigh a quarter of an hour after the coffin entered the west door before it had been deposited on the trestles under the lantern and the family and private mourners had been seated in the places reserved for them. THE LESSON. The mourners settled, the 90th Psalm was chanted to a tuno by Purcell, and then the Dean read with' great feeling the lesson which has on so many occa- sion conveyed words of hope and comfort to the afflicted. There seemed to be a special significance in his utterance of the sublime sentence, 0, Death, where is thy sting ? Oh, Grave, where is thy victory ?" which went to the hearts of all present. A PATHETIC SCENE. Gladstone's favourite hymns, Rock of Ages an Praise to the Holiest," were now sung in unison, the last while the bearers took up the coffin and passed to the grave in the North Transept, the flaon efs and the pall-bearers following in proces- sion. It WM a moment of profound emotion,-as the wife and helpmate for nearly 60 years moved with her sons to the dark cloth covered dais raised round' what was to be the last earthly resting place of the distinguished statesman, while the "hymn which had been his special consolation during the final months' of pain: resounded through the Abbey walls. Mrs. Gladstone took her seat at the head of the grave, the Prince of Wales stood at the opposite end with Lord Salisbury and Mr. Balfour close behind him. Oil the north side were the Duke of York, tOn. R6sebery, and Sir William Harcourt. The coffin, which was already placed in position for committal, was now stripped of the pall, and the brass cross and the name plate at the foot becatiM visible. The inscription was I WILLIAM EWART GLADSTONE, Born December 29, 1809, Entered into Rest May 19,1898, Being Ascension Day. Hard by the grave, upon which the adjacent effigy of the late Lord Beaconsfield seemed to look directly down, stood Earl Spencer, Mr. John Morley, Sir H, H. Fowler, and most of the members of the late Government. All were deeply moved as the coffin was lowered into tkagrave,sita thewordsof the com- mittal were recited by the Dean, followed by rendering of I heard a voice from Heaven," sung with sur- passing sweetness by the boys of the choir. The Shorter Litany was chanted, and then came the fi nal prayers said by the Archbishop. Another anthem, "Their bodies are buried in peace, but their name liveth for evermore," and Archbishop Temple, in a voice trembling with emolion, and yet. resonant, with power, gave the Grace over the open grave of his old friend. Stainer's Sevenfold Amen followed the Grace, and then the hymn, 0 God, or help in ages past," was sung, the congregation again joining in- as with one mighty; voice, the family remaining kneeling by the open grave. PROCLAIMING THE BTYTE OF TFTE DEPARTED. The Service proper being concluded it remained for Norroy King of Arms, acting for Garter King (Sir Albert Woodsr), who was too oU to attend, to proclaim the style and. title of the departed f irl'l asmuch as it hath pleased God to take out 6f th. life the Right fion. William Ewart Gladstone, one of her Majesty's most honourable Privy Councillors, some time First Lord Commissioner of the Treasury, Lord Privy Seal, Chancellor and other Treasurers of the Exchequer, her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies, President of the Board of Trade, and Lord High Commissioner Extraordinary for ihe Ionian Islands." The heraldic official (lien broke his wand of office, according to precedent, cast- ing the fragments into the open grave. WORDS OF COMPORT FOR THE BEREAVED. While the great organ was rendering Handel s Dead March from Saul those dearest to the dead man stepped forward and peered into the grave. It tvas a tense and touching moment. Mrs. Gladstone, standing between her two supporters, gazed for a long time at that deep opening in the dark-carpeted floor. When she again toother seat the Prince of Wales moved gently towards her and saluted her outstretched f hand. Lord Salisbury followed, and with bowed head seemed trying to relieve her sorrow. Then he, too, took a lor.g look at the grave. Following the Prime Minister were the Duke of Yurk.: the Duke:of'Rut- land, the Earl of Pembroke, Mr. Balfour, and many more of the montners, Next, still supported by Mr. Henry and Mr. Herbert Gladstone, the grief- stricken widow turned sobbing from the grave. As Mrs. Gladstone passed by where stood the Princess of Wales and the Duchess of York, each spoke to her words of comfort. While still the organ trembled and thundered, the great gathering of t.he people turned their faces homeward, profoundly im- pressed with the solemn scene. OTHER MEMORIAL SERVICES. Memorial Services were held simultaneously with the grandly simple Ceremonial in the Abbey at many other Churches in London, the Provinces, and abroad; and numerous Funeral sermons on the occasion were preached on Sunday. MRS. GLADSTONE'S RETURN HOME. Naturally there were many callers at the residence of Lady Frederick Cavendish in Carlton House-ter- race after the funeral to offer their respectful sym- pathy and condolences to Mrs. Gladstone. A notice affixed to the front door intithated that Mrs. Glad- stone would see no visitors, and must be undisturbed. It was added that the lady was well in health. At about 4.30 Mrs. Gladstone drove to Euston to catch the five o'clock train to Chester, and her appearance then bore out the above notice. A number of friends went to see her off, and she had for travelling companions a large partv of relatives and Hawarden friends. THE QUEEN'S SYMPATHY. With her usual graceful tact and delicate considqpeQt tion for the feelinga of those who mourn, the Queeo I has sent to Mrs. Gladstone a tender and affectionate message, which will be found below. As one who; has herself known what it is to lose a deeply-beloved husband, h-, Majesty tells the widow how keenly she is conscious of the sorrow of those near and dear to the dead statesman's heart, and how warmly she sym- pathises with them in their supreme loss. Much grati- fication is to be found in the respect and regret of the nation and- the abiding sense of the nobility of that life which has passed away; nor will it be the least of Mrs. Gladstone's consolations that the Queen expresses such grateful remembrance of her husband's devotion and zeal. On Saturday the Queen sent the following telegram from Balmoral to Mrs. Gladstone at 21, Carltoii House-terrace, S.W., the residence of Lady Frederick Cavendish 'To Mrs. Gladstone, 21, Carlton Honse-terrace, London. My thoughts are much with you to-day, when four dear husband is laid to rest. To-day's ceremony will be most trying and pain- ful for you, but it will be, at the same time, gratifying to you to see the respect and regret evinced by the nation for the memory of one whose character and intellectual abilities marked him as one of the most distinguished statesmen of my reign. I shall ever gratefully remember his devotion and eal in all that concerned my personal welfare and that of my family. VICT-bitl,&, R.I." HISTORIAN'S TRIBUTE. Mr. Bryce, M.P., speaking on Whit-Monday at a el great meeting in Aberdeen, representative of all shades of political opinion, described Mr. Glad- stone's career as without parallel for its length of public service. The right hon. gentleman was great —consistently great-in all the circumstances of life, in retirement no less than in power, in his decline as in the meridian of his strength. It was hard to single out the salient fe&turea of a character so rich and so varied in its gifts and attributes. His courage was splendid and unfailing. Of him we might say as Regent Morton said of John Knox, Here lies one who never feared the face of man." He was sometimes impetuous, especially in debate; he was usually cautious and wary; but whether impetuous or Nvary he was always brave. No one ever saw him dismayed by any danger or afraid to face any hostile odds. The difficulty of an enterprise seemed rather to stimulate him to put forth his utmost force to achieve his purpose. Never was he haunted by any of those fears fat iiis own reputation, any of those anxieties as to pos- sible misconstruction of his actions which affirightened ordinary men. His own lofty spirit was to him a sufficient source of strength. His love of freedom grew with his growth. It was 9 part of his faith in human nature, and that again was part of his faith in God, whose providential govern- uent of the world was directly, constantly, and yividly realised by him as it was by few. His imagination did not flow in the channel of x>etical composition. Indeed, he was from his boy. aood far too much absorbed in practical matters, and Df far too argumentative a turn to have the repose of mind that was essential to the poet. But it vivified his thoughts and clothed his oratory with colour. It widened his vision; it enabled him to present abstract principles in concrete form; it was the lource of his unique and extraordinary gift of raising ii question to a higher level than that on which others had discussed it. That which gave his eloquence its moving powei was the impression he conveyed that what he said was felt by him as a living reality, touching his 0\Vn emotions and as vividly present to his mind as were his own emotions to the mind of a poet. His ideals for the nation rested on three thiligfi- I freedom, religion, and the purity of family life, and the hold on the respect and affection of the British-race all over the world, which the last few weeks had shown that he so fully enjoyed, was due not merely to admiration for his gifts, but to the sense that he cherished these ideals and brought a pm-o and lofty spirit to the service of his country.

[No title]

[No title]

Advertising

Advertising

LOUGHTON LAlDY'S EXHAUSTING…

SHASHI'S BACK DOOR.

A WORLD'S BENEFACTOR.

[No title]

.,:,..,.", AN OLD SWINDLE…

HEADMASTER'S HUMOUR.

TO THE SOUTH POLE.

I j TRANSVAAL CATTLE THIEVES.

Advertising

[No title]

Advertising

( r- I ,AUTO-CAR VICTIMS.

[No title]