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DEATH OF THE EARL OF SEFTON.

MISERIES OF AN EX-COLLIER'S…

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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. -

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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. HOUSE OF COMMONS.—JUNE 28. The proceedings, which began in the usual deco- rous fashion, ended in what can only be described as a burst of Jubilee hilarity. The Government, though having a majority of about 150, were defeated on no fewer than three occasions owing to the fact that a large number of their supporters were present at the Queen's Garden Party, with the result that in the House itself they were- in the minority. For some time business went on in that humdrum manner which has been customary of late. There were nume- rous questions on the paper, few of which, however, were of public importance. Replying to Mr. Lough, who asked who was res- ponsible for the arrangements connected with. the reception of the members of the House of Commons at Buckingham Palace last Wednesday, Mr. Balfour said he had received a communication from the .Lord Chamberlain stating that it had been the earnest wish of the officials of the Household to show the utmost respect to the Speaker and the House of Commons. This was coupled with an expression of regret that, notwithstanding their best endeavours, anything should have occurred to produce an un- favourable impression. In answer to Sir C. Dilke, Mr. Curzon said that instructions had been telegraphed to her Majesty's Commissioner at Mombasa informing him that a British subject would be breaking the Jaw if he took part in restoring to his master or otherwise depriving of his liberty any fugitive slave. After some debate, the Metropolitan Water Com- panies Bill was, on the motion of Mr. Chaplin, read a second time. A motion to commit the Foreign Prisons-made Goods Bill to the Standing Committee on Trade was debated, but ultimately withdrawn; and the Police (Property) Bill went through Com- mittee. Sir M. W. Ridley having moved the second reading of the Isle of Man (Church Buildings Acts) Bill, objection was taken, whereupon there was a division, which resulted in the defeat of the Government by 65 votes against 52. Upon this Mr. Balfour moved the adjournment of the House. Here again there was a division, where- upon the Government were once more defeated by 61 votes against 58. The Opposition, who were not represented by their leaders on the front bench, cheered loudly when the Government proceeded to withdraw the Prisons Bill and the Local Government (Aldershotand Farnborough) Bill. When the Irish Educational Endowments Bill was reached in Com- mittee, a motion by Mr. Johnston to report progress was negatived by a majority of one. The House having resumed, Mr. Balfour again moved the -adjournment—a proposal which was hailed with a good deal of cheering, counter cheer- ing, and ironical laughter from the Radicals. Radical members who had an interest in the Boilers Bill lower down on the paper opposed this in the hope ef being able to bring their measure forward at Monday's sitting, but, a division being again taken, Mr. Balfour's motion was carried by 133 votes against 76, and the House forthwith adjourned at half-past seven.

A DOMESTIC TRAGEDY.

MR. JOSEPH COWEN ON THE -".…

AN EX-MAYOR FINED

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TURKEY AND GREECE. .

THE FAMINE IN INDIA.

A COSTLY BIBLE.

A MILITARY REVIEW.

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EPITOME OF NEWS.

• - CURRENT SPORT. .j"'"'"j\,."...-.-

TERRIBLE RAILWAY ACCIDENT.'

THE KHALIFA'S PLANS.

DEATH AT THE GRAVE SIDE.