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THE FARMING OF THE FUTURE.

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THE FARMING OF THE FUTURE. At-the last meeting of the Society of Art?, over which Lord Belhaven and Stenton presided, Professor James Long read a paper on Our Food Supply as affected by the Farming of the Future." Professor Long declared that he had a greater respect for agri- culturists than for any other body of men, and that none deseiWd-more consideration at the hands of their fellow-countrymen, for he who devoted his life te the-HBoil virtually renounced his chances of prosperity, and devoted himself to the pro- duction of food for the use of mankind. Such a man {>rospered when he commanded, as the fruit of his abour, the necessaries and the comforts of life, and his cup would be full if he were in possession of the soil he tilled. Agricultural success throughout the world was very modest in comparison with success achieved in commerce and the, general walks of life. In 25 years we had passed from old world farming to methods which were being inculcated by scientific teaching, and in proportion as those methods were im- proved and adopted the failures of the end of the nine- teenth century would be.converted into the successes of the twentieth. Our farmers had been reared in a severely, practical school, but their training was entirely insufficient, and the farming of to-day was production from hand to mouth, without capital, with a constantly depreciating soil, diminishing stock, and prospective ruin. It was clearly recognised that SO long as it was possible for every additional farmer in Canada and the west to provide bread for 800 people rupon every additional 100 acres of virgin soil which he added to the world's great farm, prices would remain lovr, and our British systems of agricul- ture would be at a disadvantage. There must, however, be some articles of home produce which, on account of their perishable nature or their superior quality, would realise better prices in our markets, and for which the demand would increase with the growth of the population. It was in that direction that agri- culturists, aided and supported by economic methods suggested by science and practice, and by new coridi- tions which it was the function of the State to pro- vide, would gradually feel their way. With the vast corn areas of new countries before us, and the self-denying character of the people who occupied them, we could not hope that grain would continue to be a prominent article of our farm produce, but we could continue to provide live stock for meat and for export, milk for our congested population, butter and cheese of the best quality for the thousands ,tho would continue to pay for it, malting barley for our brewers-wben Parliament had afforded the oppor- tunity by discriminating between barley-malt and eugar-poultry, eggs, fruits, and vegetables for sale at house doo/s, and even hay and straw where maximum crops of these materials were obtainable. Among the conditions under which these articles may be profitably produced in the future were intensive or garden farming, smaller farms, security for improvements and freedom in cropping and sale, extended ownership involving a convenient system of deferred payment, and a greater use of farmyard manure. He did not believe that our imports of food would necessarily increase in proportion to the growth of the population, while our home production stood still, but he was of opinion that we should he equal for a considerable period to the product ion of I increasing quantities of the articles which he had enumerated. He did not anticipate any marked im- provement in agricultural prosperity in the next f¡f\v years, for modern legislation and the exercise of greater skill would probably do no more than enable the farmer to hold his own against the still lower prices which were to be expected. Foreign and Colonial Crops and stock would continue to be poured upon our shores, but when prices had been reached below which the articles could not be offered for sale, the British farmer would be left with a market which, though smitten nigh to death, would sufhee to enable agriculture to exist until the return of more pros- perous conditions.—After a brief discussion lpid taken place, the proceedings concluded with a vote of thanks to. Professor Long.

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