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NEWS NOTES. = )Bovzvm the ultimate outcome may justify action, and however needful action may be, there is a feeling of repugnance m many minds in this country as regards taking part in a military advance in the Soudan. We have sore memories of previous expeditions, and the con- tinued British occupation has been unpalatable to a number of worthy people here. But we put our hands to the plough in what our statesmen were persuaded was a good cause, and it is difficult to see—though we have been left, practically, to bear all the heat and burden of the day—how Ave can turn back with the work unfinished. And this may be the favour- able moment for completing the task. France, instead of giving us loyal support, has latterly stood by the fence of the field of toil, looking idly and. enviously on; and the temptation has at times been great for those responsible for the direction of British affairs to give up the project in disgust. We have held stubbornly on our way, however, in the hope of making a satisfactory job of it in the end, despite rebuffs and discourage- ments and if only we give peaco and quiet to the long disturbed Nile valley after all, our endeavours wiil have an issue to which we may point with pardonable national pride. IT may easily be seen how recent happenings in Abyssinia have hastened the time for renewed activity in the Soudan. The victory of their co-religionists over Italy to the southward has stirred up once again the ever-restless Arabs who scourge the Soudan perennially into greater boldness. Ever since, in 1885, we closed the Nilo carapaigu, the Arabs have persistently raided around the outposts at Wady Haifa, and occasionally they have ventured near Korosko, and menaced tho lines o £ communication. For a time their de- feat atToski by Sir Francis Grenfell kept them quiet, but years have sped sinco then, aod they have grown as troublesome as of yore. So now a new campaign against the Mahdi s successor and the dervishes has been determined on. Egyptian troops, Soudanese and native soldiers, are to be sent forward in forco under tho Sirdar, General Sir H. Kitchener, R.E., to re- occupy Dongola. As to the bearing of a projected Anglo- Egyptian Expedition to the Soudan—though a pacitic agreement seems to be within sight as betweer^'ictoriouslyingMenelikand the discom- fited Italians—there is grave doubt whether the movement of Egyptian troops towards Dongola may not como too late to avert the fall of Kassala into the hands of the dervishes. And ,it has been predicted that on the capture of Kas- sala. the Khalifwill push forward to tho invasion of Egyptian territory; and consequently the Dongola advance about to be made under arraiigement between our own and tho Egyptian Governments has been held to be a necessary measure of precaution, if nothing more. It is highly probable, it is said, that 'had the Italians been successful in their operations against the Abyssmians, the Egyptian authorities, supported by her Majesty's representatives at Cairo, would have recommended an advance up the Xiie, with a view to the re-conquest of Khartoum. .The; question now is, shall the dervishes be eimply driven bask and held at bay, or shall they be finally crushed ? It seems certain that no half-hearted action will be of avail, and that we had better make up our minds to see the thing out as quiclfly as may bp, or else abandon the idea of ever seeing l!gypt jlear of Arab trouble. TJjtiLTTARY figures and statistics command attention at once nowadays. From a Return just issued we find that our colonies and Egypt absorb—on a peaco footing—38,-100 regular soldiers. The field army, consisting of three Army Corps and four Cavalry Brigades," takes up 112,098 men, gairisons and defensive posi- tions at home account for 120,4:23, including militia, beside 13,300 volunteers. There are 33,335 troops held in reserve, including 10,000 volunteers, 7932 in tho depots, &c., and 28,000 recrriits with less than one years servieb. The Army Reserve is put at 48,000 for the iiekl army, 26,000 for defences at home, and oOOO to be kspt in hand, the total being taken at 79,1(;0. The cost for the colonies and Egypt is put down at ;t3,2.-)4,0-jO for the field army £ ti,u24,(XX), lor home defence £ 3,(503,000, for troops heM in reserve £ '70:?,800, for depots 1,400 and for recruits £ 1,500,000. TInma returns ^S,OQO and the colonies and I^gypt a^3^,000. Ilnfs the cost-of the Army, net, for the colonies and Egypt is ;c AVith things" all quiet" this is a pretty stiff figure to pay as "tho penalty of empireand the prospect of a iar bigger bill to come in with the appearance ol any disturbance is not particularly pleasing. ADVANCE, Australia! True to tlie^r motto, our Colonies underneath the world; backed vigorously by their respective Govern- ments, are making strenuous efforts to cap- ture the English food markets, to the farther exclusion of home producers. The New South Wales Ministry, following the lead set by the neighbouring colony of Victoria, has determined to constitute a Foard for Sports. The department will conduct a thorough system of inspection, grading and branding, issuing certificates for all classes of -exports. The Government will undertake, more- over to provide cheap and reliable freight arrangements throughout the different seasons, and will station in London an ofiicer qualified to report upon the condition of the various shipments on arrival. The timber growers will also endeavour to secure the gradnig and classi- fication of all timbers for export, The Govern- ments of Australia are consideiiiig a proposal thai ajl meat exported shall bear a uniform brand, indicating that it has been passed by the Government inspectors as sound and wholesome. British consumers may like the picture, btit-Bri-tisb producers emphatically do not. The questions involvod demand sciious deliberation; THE Profe^OR Huxley Memorial movement progresses. The Committee numbers noHv -■onto seven hundred influential people, anfl qoosidejrably over two thousand pounds are in Wd. As a sufficient sum is thus gua- ranteed for the statue at the British Huseum of. Natural History and the medal at the Royal College of Science, London, the first two objects definitely decided upon, sub- e°nnnïttes have been appointed to carry them. out, and designs for the statue are now being prepaid by Mr. Onslow Ford, R.A. Appeal is now being made for tho third object of the ,comniittee -tile furtherance of biological science tn some manner to "be hereafter determined, de- pondent upon the amount collected. FOE the coining Iloyal bridc-s, the Princess Maud of Wales and her cousin, the Princess Alexandra of Gobutg, their trousseaux are now in forward preparation, and it is satisfactory to learn that both outfits are being made almost entirely hi ngland. rhe Princess Alex- andra's trousseau is in the hands of the modi.tie who made the weddmg fitments for tho Duchess Ooburg's two eldest daughters, Princess Marie, C&v.. Princess of Romania and the «rand Duchess of Hesse. Tho Duchess has truly Royal ideas as to what a trousseau should bo, and Princess Alexandra's has been ordered on the same generous scale as those of her elder o818tere;.o, i",

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..CURRENT SPORT. v -

DAMAGE BY THE GALE.

MURDER AT BRENTFORL.

"L ICLOSING OF RALATON" PITS.…

- PROFESSOR BRYCE ON SOUTH…

- ACCIDENT TO ROCHESTER-BRIDGE.

"'!!!!!!!! SUNDAY OPENING…

AN OLD RAILWAY MAN'.

hRHEST AND DEATH.

. TIC THE VENEZUELAN QUESTION.

A SOLDIER'S SUIOIOK.

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FORTY-THREE PRISONERS MURDERED…

-e-_ THE TRANSVAAL TROUBLE.

, PRISONERS AS WITNESSES.I

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I OUR PRECIOUS SKIN.

CURRENCY REFORMS.

NOT MADE IN HEAVEN.

HUMOURS OF RUGBY FOOTBALL.

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2!!M-ST. GEORGE'S ELECTION…

THE EMPRESS'S EDICT.

IIE REMAINED AN ENGLISHMAN.

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EGYPT AND THE SOTJPAN.

------_--------ROMANCE OF…