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Utir fouirou Coruspoiitat.

THE END OF A POLISH PATRIOT.

HOW to DISPOSE of TWO MILLIONS!j

A DOMESTIC TRAGEDY IN CUMBER-LAND.

FRIGHTENED TO DEATH BY A ,GHOST!

THE LANCASHIRE DISTRESS.

THE MURDER NEAR LEOMINSTER.

A VIOLENT LOVER IN CAMBRIDGE.

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A VIOLENT LOVER IN CAMBRIDGE. A case somewhat analogous in its circumstances to the memorable Townley case has been progressin g for some time in Cambridge and its vicinity, and was brought to a climax—happily far less terrible than Townley's—on Monday. It should be premised that all the parties interested are highly respectable and opulent Charles Traylen (the offender) is the son of an opulent farmer and brewer at West Wickham, Cambridgeshire, occupying under the lord-lieutenant, the Earl of Hardwicke; liia age about 24. His threatened victim is a young lady of great personal attractions, and his cousin. Her name is Harriet Leeds, and her general residence is with her brother, at St. Jves, in Huntingdonshire. For a long period Charles Traylen has professed an affection for Miss Leeds, an affection not reciprocated or encouraged. It would seem that in June last Traylen and Miss Leeds met at the house of a mutual friend, and Traylen seeking an opportunity when he met Miss Leeds alone, urgently pressed his suit. She, being fancy free," and having a knowledge of Traylen's violent character, informed him that she never intended to marry. Whereupon Traylen put his hand in his pocket, on her demurring to his suit, as if to draw a knife, and threatened to murder her if she did not accept his advances. She being, according to her own state- ment, terrified, made an appearance of assent, and since then, as the relationship gave Traylen the privilege of entree at the house of Miss Leeds' brother at St. Ives, he has been most persistent in his suit, till Miss Leeds wrote him, firmly declining his attentions. Nothing further occurred till Saturday last, when Miss Leeds accompanied to Cambridge a gentleman with whom she was staying on a visit at Imping- ton, about three miles from Cambridge. This gentleman, Mr. Batterson, had driven Miss Leeds to Cambridge and there left her in order to attend to his commercial pursuits, on the understanding that lie would call for her at the house of a mutual friend where Miss Leeds was going to take tea. In the course of Saturday afternoon, Mr. Traylen met Miss Leeds in Cambridge, got into. conversation with her, ascertained that she was going to the neighbourhood of Castle-end (or Huntingdon-road) turnpike, and pressed his company upon her thither. He renewed his suit, and was again rejected, whereupon he told Miss Leeds-he being in a state of great excitement-that, if he could not have her, "He would swing for her—he would have her life-he would walk the gallows for her." So they parted for a time, but shortly after tea had been partaken of, Mr. Traylea again presented himself at the house, and was admitted. In twenty minutes or so Mr. Batterson arrived, and at once removed Miss Leeds in his gig to Impington. Mr. Traylen remained behind for some time, but between nine and ten o'clock presented himself at Bar. Batterson's, at Impington, and being admitted to the presence of Miss Leeds, again became violent and excited, and Mr. Batterson, as a mea- sure'of precaution, called in a neighbour, Mr. Perter, of Histon. Mr. Batterson, thinking from Mr. Traylen's demon- strations that he had a pistol, threw himself between Traylen and Miss Leeds, and secured the retreat of the latter. Next Messrs. Batterson and Porter persuaded Mr. Traylen to accompany them to Cambridge, and left him safely lodged, as they thought, at an hotel. This was between eleven and twelve o'clock. To Mr. Batterson's great surprise, however, Mr. Traylen again presented himself at his house on Sunday morning, renewed his threats, and said that he would not leave the place alive-that he would do some mischief, too, before he went. Mr. Batterson, seriously alarmed, called in the assistance of the police, and gave Traylen into custody. The constable conveyed his prisoner to Cambridge and before Mr. Deputy Chief Constable Stretten, who reasoned with Traylen, and in consequence of suggestions by other parties immediately concerned, offered to release the prisoner with- out any formal charge being entered against him, if he would place himself in the hands of and adopt the ad- vice of his friends. Traylen refused, and therefore was necessarily locked up. On Monday morning he was brought before Thomas J. Ficklin, Esq. (surgeon, and magistrate for the county). Miss Leeds and Traylen were neces- sarily both present, accompanied by friends, but neither had legal assistance. Mr. Traylen exclaimed, For God's sake, Harriet, have mercy on me;" but in answer Miss Leeds said, with sobs and hysterical weeping, that she felt that her life was not safe unless Traylen was put under the restraint of the law. From the testimony of Mr. Batterson and others it appeared that Mr. Traylen is of a most excitable disposition. Traylen offered to the magis- trate that if he would let him go, he would leave the coun- try;" but Miss Leeds replicated that she was certain that her life would be taken before such a consummation would be arrived at if he were allowed to depart. Mr. Ficklin said that he had no alternative other than to call upon the defendant to enter into sureties to keep the peace. He could see that the defendant was not mentally in a fit state to be at large, unless under proper restraint. He must therefore find sureties, himself in 4001, and two others in 200L each. Several of the defendant's friends, who could have been pecuniarily responsible to many times the amount required were present, but refused to tender the required bail, evidently thinking that it was not pru- dent so to do till the defendant's temper was mollified, and the excitement under which he laboured had sub- sided somewhat; they appeared to entertain the belief that if the defendant were allowed to go at liberty directly, he would attempt the execution of his threats. So he was removed in custody to the county gaol.

A REAL BIT OF ROMANCE!

A VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY.

LAYING CLAIM TO AN ESTATE.

AN ILLUSTRIOUS VISITOR!

EXTRAORDINARY SCENE at a SALE!

A ROMANCE IN LOW LIFE. '

THE GREAT DIVORCE CASE! •I

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