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LONDON LETTER. .

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LONDON LETTER. (FROM OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENT.) SPECIALLY WIRED. LONDON, Monday Night. AGRICULTURISTS ASKING FOP. ATTENTION. Some very decided language is likely to De used at the meeting of the National Agricultural Union on Thursday in refer- ence to the Government unless Mr Walter Long, at the dinner to-morrow night, under the auspices of the Chamber of Agricul- tlre, is able to make an announcement that the agricultural interest will not be absolutely neglected in the coming Session. It is not expected that he will be in a position to intimate the readiness of the Government to propose a bounty on wheat— Mr Thomas Read's pet panacea—but both landowners and farmers (in common with many other sections of the community) insist upon the urgent necessity of dealing with food adulteration. Any dubity on the part of Mr Long in reference to this subject will tend to fan the simmering discontent of agriculturists into an open flame. THE MONEY-LENDING INQUIRY. If, after the revelations of last Session, the money-lending inquiry is not any further proceeded with, there will be much speculation as to the reasons which have prompted the Government in stifling the inquiry. It is no secret that certain powerful members of the Administration Were not at any time favourable to the appointment of the Commission, and only assented to it because the demand came largely from supporters of Ministers, and could not very safely be resisted. But why, since it has been clearly shown that the investigation was necessary, it should be considered advisable to drop it like 4 hot coal, is hard to understand. Perhaps Mr Farrow's promises to con- tribute further facts will partly solve the mystery. At present many people simply decline to believe that the Committee will mot sit again. PEERAGE OR BARONETCY ? It may be regarded as almost certain lhat the name of Mr William McEwan, M.P., will appear in the list of New Year's honours. Whether he is to receive a peer- age or a baronetcy is a topic of discussion in various circles. It is unusual for a Conservative Premier to advise the Queen to convert a Liberal member of the House of Commons into a member of the House of Lords, but after the elevation to the Bench of Sir Walter Phillimore by the Lord Chancellor all things are considered possible. The splendid gift of Mr "McEwan to the Edinburgh University would justify some signal mark of honour, and there is a general wish that it should be bestowed upon him at an early date. THE RAILWAY CRISIS. Railway magnates make no secret of their delight at the discouragements poured by Mr Ritchie on the appeal made by the Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants for Board of Trade intervention in respect of their grievances. Although the opinions from such a source must be taken for what they are worth, there is a, strong belief at railway headquarters that all danger of a general strike is averted, and it is significant that the employees of the Great Western Company have emphatically dissociated themselves from any sympathy with a movement in that direction. THE ISLINGTON SHOW. This has been a typical agricultural show day. Islington has looked its worst, the weather being well calculated to plunge agriculture into more than normal depression. But large numbers of people have braved the. discouragement of mud and rain, and Royalty in the persons of the Prince of Wales, the Duke of Cam- bridge, and the Duke of Coburg have been among the visitors. MUSICIANS AND PRESSMEN AT GOLF. Seven representatives of the Press tried conclusions with seven well-known musi- cians on the golf links of the Tooting Bee Club at Furzedown. to-day. The musicians, who were captained by Mr Dalziel Hamil- ton, were much stronger on handicap form than the Pressmen, but the latter managed to win the match by a narrow margin, both of games and of holes. The musicians had the consolation of winning a friendly foursome in the afternoon. PRESBYTERIAN PULPITS EMPTY. If the Rev. Geo. Harson, of Rathgar, Dublin, declines to accept the call to Marylebone Presbyterian Church, the Selection Committee will begin to despair about getting a suitable pastor. So far all their advances have been courteously but firmly repelled. Mr Harson, they believe, is anxious to come to London, where he is at present quite unknown. He is de- scribed by those who have heard him preach at Marylebone as both eloquent and original. Neither of the other two important Presbyterian Churches here which are without a minister has yet b een able to agree upon a call to anyone. SIR SQUIRE BANCROFT'S CHARITABLE READINGS. Her Highness Princess Edward of Saxe- Weimar has notified her intention of being present at the reading of Dickens's Christmas Carol which Sir Squire Bancroft has promised to give on Monday next on behalf of the United Kingdom Beneficent Aseociation at Grosvenor House. SCENES FROM WOLMER. There is a delightful sense of open-air freshness and variety about the scenes from Wolmer Forest exhibited by Mr Fignoles Fisher at Messrs Dowdeswell's Galleries. In the dainty water-colour sketches and the few larger oil paintings the artist has caught the beauty of heath and woodland flecked by the changing lights and shadows of an English sky to a delicate touch. Mr Fisher unites strength of treatment, and the drawings are admirable not only for workmanship, but for the truth to Nature which all lovers of the country must recognise. The rendering of sunlit woods is as skilful as the effects of hazy mists or wind-swept distances. TRIPLE ALLIANCE ON THE STAGE. The Triple Alliance is the title of a new farcical comedy by Mr W. S. Beadle, which was produced at the Strand Theatre this afternoon under interest- ing circumstances. The play was recently tried at Chatham Theatre under another title. It might now with some appropriateness be called The Quintuple Alliance," for Mr Tom Thorne, who enacted the chief part, was supported by no fewer than four members of the Thorne family—his brothers George and Frederick, his sister Emily, and her son, Mr F. K. Gilmore. Two young limbs of the law, both secretly engaged to be married, occupy the same chambers, and their impecuniosity results in their having writs served upon them. All these cir- cumstances it is their desire to conceal from a-n inquisitive uncle and also from the rather of the two sisters to whom they severally are engaged. Other characters fcre persuaded that the uncle from India is slightly deranged, and as they therefore fear to contradict him he is led to imagine strange things. Things get more than Usually mixed up, even for farcical comedy, aut as the audience are not mystified they re free to enjoy the perplexities that arise. 't turns out at last that the young men ">DÙ maidens have wasted their ingenuity, and needlessly caused their own troubles, because the father of their sweethearts is willing for them to marry on finding that the uncle is forgiving and rich. Other performers who help the play are Miss Kate Phillips and Mr Algernon Newark. The audience was friendly, and the piece will doubtless win popular favour at suburban and provincial theatres.

-_----_...--MR ASQUITH AT…

---THE TINPLATE TRADE.

..__.....--.....----DISTRESS…

- ---------__---MURDEROUS…

--...._---------UNHAPPY ARMENIA.

.-------------TO-DAY'S WEATHER,4.30…

KAISER WANTS MORE SHIPS

DISCUSSION IN THE REICHSTAG.

UTMAN KHELS SUBMIT.

UTMAN KHELS CAVE IN.

---.-------PRESIDENT McKINLEY'S…

--_.--u_-----A DISABLED FRENCH…

----------__--CARDIFF STEAMER…

- THE CABINET.

MR GLADSTONE AT CANNES.

STRANGE CONDUCT OF THE DOCK…

DISCUSSION BY CARDIFF COUNCIL.

THE GREAT LONDON FIRE.i

IFOURTEEN YEARS FOR MANSLAUGHTER.I

------------------_.__.iDARING…

.......... ,------_n___-THE…

,....----------- - "WHEN DOCTORS…

I I. MEETING OF THE MEN'S…

THE BOARD OF TRADE REPLY

THE STRIKE NOTICES.

MEN'S EXECUTIVE MEET.

OFFICIAL REPORT OF THE PROCEEDINGS.

PONTYPOOL ROAD.

MAE S YC WMMER.

DOWLAIS.

ABERDARE.

LLANELLY.

TREDEGAR.

-----.-AN OLD LEADER'S VIEWS.

NO SIGN OF PEACE.

PROCEDURE OF THE CONFERENCE…

THE EMPLOYERS' ALLEGATIONS.

PROPOSED CONFERENCE OF TRADE…

CONTRIBUTIONS FLOWING IN.

THE BALLOT OF MEMBERS.

LEEDS MEN DETERMINED.

WHAT THE EMPLOYERS SAY.

SITUATION AT GLASGOW. *!

A SUGGESTION FROM MR !MADDISON,…

COUNTING THE VOTES. j