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----THE DEAN FOREST TRAGEDY.…

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THE DEAN FOREST TRAGEDY. POiiiaE.COl.TRT PROCEEDINGS Altboagb roast* aise days ban elapsed since it was conveyed tc the public that an alleged nmrder bad been committed at Drybrook, Dean Forest, and although during that period Supt. Ford, of Go'eford, who has assumed the charge of the case, has been vigilant and actively prose- cuting enquiries, the elucidation of material facts concerning and bearing immediately upon the case has been of but slow progress. It will be remembered that Joseph Tyler was a labourer. On Christmas Day he went about singing, and in the evening got as far as the Rose-in-Hand beer-house, Morse-lane. In the space of about half an hour after the house was closed Tyler was found lying dead a quarter of a mile from that inn, there being a contused wound on the side of bis head sufficient to cause death. George Mansell, collier, living in the neighbourhood, was standing over the body when the discovery was made, and he was at length apprehended on suspicion. The striking part of the evidence, after one magisterial inquiry and two meetings of the jury, is that it was sworn that there was a quarrel in the road after closing, when the voice of Mansell was distinguished, and another voice said," Putthat stonedown"—asmail road-stone is believed to have been the instrument of death, in any case. About that time two women, mother and daughter, living half a mile away, beard a man cry out four times, "Don't, George." the sound of the voice came from the direction of the spot where the body was discovered. It will be observed that the prisoner's name is George. It was in this interesting state that the inquiry before the jury was adjourned, the court being dissatisfied with the evidence, and requiring more evidence before proceeding to find a verdict. When the hour arrived at which the business of the court at Littledean began on Friday morning there was assembled an unusually large number of Forest colliers, who had come down, as they called it, to "club," that being the place were many of them make deposits of cash. Mr F. F. Goold, barrister, of Little- dean, instructed by Mr J. S. Bradstock, solicitor, Cinderford, appeared for the prisoner. The justices present were Mr Arnold Thomas, who was in the chair, with Messrs A. U. Bright and T. B. Brain. Prisoner was accommodated with a seat, and Mr Superintendent Ford, addressing the chair- man, said he must ask that all witnesses be ordered ont of court; he had experienced great difficulty in obtaining new evidence. t Richard Mansell, a youth, and a brother of the prisoner, was the first witness called. He said he thought that when he left the Rose-in-Hand at 10.15 on Christmas night deceased was still there, or at any rate that was near enough." He left prisoner just outside the bouse. One of the witnesses (Roberts) had asked witness to take prisoner home, but he didn't do Witness, with Milson, Simmonds, and Samuel Burton, then went to Burton's house, which was the RuardeSn side. Superintendent Ford deposed to the part he took upon receiving information of the finding of the body on the 26th December. The mark was upon the right side of the forehead, and it cor- responded with the stone produced. There was a mark on the side of the road where the stone was fouud which seemed to indicate that a person had sat down there. It was closd to the hedge, and was soft ground. There was no blood or dirt upon prisoner's clothing. Witness charged prisoner with the wilful murder of the deceased that morning, and cautioned him. He said he had told the police all he bad seen and known, and that he had nothing more to say. Thomas Evans, collier, Ruardean-hill, said he was at the inn in question at seven o'clock Christ- mas night. Deceased was in the bar at closing time, and just afterwards deceased was singing in the road near the inn dooi. Several persons were near, but not the prisoner. Deceased got again into the bar after singing in the road. Witness got home at 10.30. He did not bear the deceased singing as he (witness) went along. Milsos Simmonds deposed to seeing Alfred Trigg dragging deceased along the passage of the inn. He had his arm round the man's neck. Deceased stood upon a chair to sing, as he did at the Maltshovel at Ruardean the same evening." He saw the prisoner, Richard Mansell, and Samuel Burton together outside. Deceased might have been there, but witness did not see bim. Witness did not think decased was sober. —Cross-examined Deceased did not seem sober at the Maltshovel. He threw himself about as he sung. Beatrice Simmonds, 13 years cf age, daughter of George Simmonds,said she went to the Rose-in- Hand with her father at 7 o'clock on Christmas night. Julia Tippim deposed to hearing some quarrel- ling as some men passed her cottage. Among the voices were those of prisoner and Samuel Burton. As the men passed on, one voice said, •'Put that stone down." Thomas Trigg, brother of the last witness, de- posed to having gone down the road from the inn some minutes aftat ten o'clock, and hearing voices saying, "Gat up. Joe." There was no reply. He then came Ut in the prisoner, who was standing by deceased as he lay on the ground. Prisoner said, as he got to the body, that he thought be saw some oerson going from it. Cross-examined Prisoner stopped near the body till it was taken away. He made no attempt to get away. Timothy Marfell deposed to having struck a light, and discovering who the deceased man was. Prisoner having said some one had run away, witness went back, and found Moses Matthews and bis wife had passed, but they were not Tunning. While waiting two hours for the police, prisoner Raid, "This is a bad job." P.C. Seabright deposed to going to prisoner's house at 2 o'clock a.m. on the 26th ult. Prisoner was in bed. Witness asked him if he had seen Joseph Tyler that night before he came up to him on the road. He replied that he did not know Joseph Tyler, and had not seen him till he found him on the road. He did not report the case, as be thought it was a man drunk. Prisoner bad not mentioned anything about the mystery, because he said he did notdisturb them, as it was so late. When witness charged him, his reply was that be knew nothing about it. Ernest Pringle, registered medical practitioner of Cinderford, said there was a contused wound over the brain, which was the cause of death. The skull was uninjured. There was consider- able herooerrhage on the brain. It was easy for such injury to have been caused by falling upon » stone. Prisoner was committed for trial. The wit- nesses were then bound over to appear at the next Assizes. Prisoner throughout the day, although looking pale, did not evince anything in the nature of pervonsness, but followed the evidence closely.

FORTUNE-TELLING AT \BRECON,

--_----LOCAL COMMISSIONS.

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SAD FATALITY AT NEW MILFORD.

ALLEGED MISCONDUCT BY A MASTER…

CARDIFF CORPORATION.

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ST. JOHN'S DINNER TO THE POOR.

LLANWONNO SCHOOL BOARD.

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WELSH INTERNATIONAL MATCHES.—…

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---INTERMEDIATE EDUCATION…

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--------------DEATH AT A DINNER…

----------THE MUMBLES WATER…

------..----.---AWKWARD WEDDING…

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THE TRADE OF SOUTH WALES.…

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--------------EXECUTION BY…

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A CARDIFF ASSAULT CASE.

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---__-----"WE SHALL HAVE HOME…

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CARDIFF SCHOOL BOARD. -

THE TRUTH REVEALED.

---------HOW A LIFE WAS SAVED.

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