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-------IS THE COLLIERS' PROSPECT…

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IS THE COLLIERS' PROSPECT BRIGHTER ? A LETTER from MABON and one of his colleagues, which appears in another column, goes far to make the immediate outlook more promising than we were led to believe yesterday. "MABON" evidently knows the facts of the case, and he also knows that such a statement coming from him will be generally accepted. At the same time, our statement of the case was very carefully drawn up, and we cannot do otherwise than leave it where it is. Neither MABON nor anyone else has called in question a single assertion put forth, so that we may take for granted that there j is no statement of fact to withdraw. What probability there is of giving and taking on both sides remains to be seen, and every- thing depends now upon the temper in which further negotiations are carried on. So long as both sides are determined to come to an understanding which will re- sult in a friendly conclusion to the negotiations, all will yet be well, and the whole community will rejoice. Facts are stubborn, but men engaged in controversy are sometimes even more stub- born. This is not, however, what we anticipate in connection with the Sliding Scale Committee. There, on the contrary, we look only for the most. gentlemanly aftability on both sides, com- bined with that keen, business-like manner of which such men can never rid them- selves. In the meantime, the meeting be- tween the colliers' delegates and their representatives on the Sliding Scale Committee is an event which cannot but be awaited with intense interest and considerable suspense and anxiety. The account which we publish this morning of an interview between one of our corre- spondents and some of the men versed in the dispute at the Ocean Collieries will, we fear, not help to clear the atmosphere. It is, in some respects, to be regretted that all the miners and colliers of South Wales and Monmouth- shire cannot unite in one grand combina- tion, but there are reasons why such a union has not been effected, and, therefore, we will not touch upon the subject. At the same time, it would be rather strange to have the workmen at the Ocean Collieries united with those which are in the North of England, while all others in this neighbour- hood occupy independent ground. But we see no reason yet for despairing of a friendly settlement there also between masters and men. Jt will be a pity if they cannot put faith in each other so far as to continue the friendly relationship which has so long been honourably maintained between them. There can be no doubt that a most strenuous effort, even to the length of a struggle, should be made on both sides to avoid anything like the severing of a bond or a breach in mutual confidence.

SIR HORACE DAVE1 AT AN EJ9TEEDVOD.

A VOLUBLE J. P.

--"DESERTS THE CREED OF HIS…

--' 'THE SWANSEA 1IUMMT.

THE TRIMMING OF COAL SHIPS.

-_____-_ .BARRY DOCK,

. ---_--THE TRADE OF CARDIFF,

----------THE NATIONAL BANK…

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SATURDAY, JANUARY 4, 1890,…

CLOTHILS FOR STATUES.

---SIR JOHN LCBBOCKS BILL.

JROSPERITT AND DRUNKENNESS.