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HOW SPION KOP WAS TAKEN.

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HOW SPION KOP WAS TAKEN. On Tuesday night General Warren's infantry made a sudden attack upon the Boer position on Spion Kop. Mounting the precipitous sides of the hill they charged the Boer entrenchments. The enemy fled before our advance, evidently being taken by surprise, and had not had time to make -preparations for a stout resistance. Two Boers were killed, and the remainder of the force which held the summit was dispersed. The attack had been immediately preceded by an admirable and effective shell fire upon the Boer position. On Wednesday morning very heavy fighting (em- ffl( noed, and proceeded almost all day without the Blightest cessation. The fighting was of the most desperate nature. TUenemy, undoubtedly irritated at the easy manner in wnich our forces had carried the important :positions of the summit of Spion Kop, poured a terrific shell fire on the captured positions from their big guns, while their Maxims and Nordenfelts were also brought into play. The lighter artillery of the enemy was very destructive to our troops, who gallantly maintained their positions and made as effective a reply as was possible under the circumstances. Attempts were mad i by our artillery to locate the smal:«r but more destructive guns of the Boers in order th-1 ou" fire might be concentrated upon them and t'.eirdepdiy effectiveness destroyed. The attempts to locate the enemy's lighter artillery were, how- ever not very successful. At nine o clock our infantry 'gallantly stxrmed and carried another trench occupied by the enemy, and the troops held this advanced position until their ammunition gave out. The Boers were not slow to notice that some- thing was amiss, and encouraged by the silence of our men's rifles, a strong force of the enemy crept slowly forward and actually came right up to the front. Here they had a taste of the bayo- nets of the British infantry. The conflict was short but bloody, and the Boers gave way before the fixed bayonets and sullenly retired, not, how- ever, without having secured a few ot our men as prisoners. Reinforcements were poured into the positions we bad captured, and those positions were splendidly maintained under a murderous fire from the Boer positions until darkness put a stop to the fray. The conduct of our infantry all day was magnif- icent. Nothing could have exceeded their obsti- nate bravery during the truly desperate fighting which lasted absolutely the whole day without a minute's cessation. Our naval guns gave able assistance to our troops, shelling the enemy inces- santly from Mount Alice.

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