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LAMENTABLE DEATH. OF CAPTAIN…

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NOTES AND GOSSIP : LOCAL AND…

+ A LIBERAL M.P. ON PUBLIC…

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+ A LIBERAL M.P. ON PUBLIC DUTY. Mr William Allen, M.P. for Newcastle-under- Lyme, speaking at Welsbpool last week on the occasion of the distribution of prizes to the "tC" Company 5th Y.B. S.W.B. said: Colonel Pryce-Jones and gentlemen. I feel that I have been placed in an altogether improper position this evening in being called upon to respond to the Montgomeryshire Imperial Yeomanry, because I see on each side of me gentlemen who are my superiors in rank in that force, and Ijthink the duty ought to have devolved upon them and not upon me, but, as your Colonel has called upon me to speak, I must at your gathering fulfil his bidding, and I shall do so with very great pleasure because I know you will forgive me for any short-comings you may observe in my remarks. When I came into this room a short time ago I had no idea it was a gathering of this kind that was going on, because your Colonel only asked me, in a friendly sort of way, to look in, threatening if I did not TO SEND A PICKET to arrest me (laughter). I feel, in the first place, that I ought to congratulate your Colonel and you upon the position that the South Wales Borderers have attained. I understand that your officers are the most highly-qualified of those belonging to any Volunteer battalion throughout the country (hear, hear), and I further understand that they are sound patriotic Britons, two of them having volun- teered for the Imperial Yeomanry (applause). One of them has told me to-night that he is willing to throw up his commission and everything and join as an ordinary trooper. I think that shows he is a patriot, and puts his duty to his Queen and country before anything else. Nine others have volunteered for the front, and if they are all chosen I am sure they will also be a credit to you, to their regiment and to OLD ENGLAND (hear, hear). I believe I have also to congratulate you upon the possession of a most excellent band which has been brought into a very high state of efficiency, and is now almost second to none in the country. Indeed, when I hear of all the good things that can be said about you I feel that they are so many that any congratulations from an out- sider are but little, because you have so many merits that I am sure you can appreciate them yourselves (laughter and applause). Your Colonel has been good enough to refer to his friendship with me in the House of Commons. I think that it is one of the great advantages of our English social life that when we are not actually engaged in political controversy we can all meet as friends, and drop our differences and forget that we are men of opposite parties in political life (hear, hear). Your Colonel is a member for this town and the allied boroughs and although I DIFFER FROM HIM in political opinion, still I believe that on his side and for a man holding his opinions, which un- fortunately, perhaps for myself, I think to be wrong, you can have no one who would serve his Queen and his country and this part of the district in a more efficient manner (loud applause). I need not describe to you, and I could never tell you, the regard in which he is held in the House of Parliament—(hear, hear)- and the way in which men on both sides of the House bow to his judgment and hold his opinion in high esteem (applause). Now, you have asked me to-night to respond to the toast of the Imperial Yeomanry. I think the raising of this force will mark an era in the history of this country. For years now we have been at peace or practically at peace, for the wars in which we have been engaged have been against un- civilised peoples. We are now fighting a civilised people, we are fighting people armed with weapons as good as our own, we are fighting with people that are brave-people that are WILLING TO DIE for a mistaken idea of what is right for their country; and in this hour of England's need when the very empire is at stake, when the whole future of our nation depends upon us crushing the Boers in South Africa and establishing some form of rule through the length and breadth of that land over which the English flag flies supreme, I believe that it is the duty of every Englishman, that it is the duty of every Briton, of every patriot, of everyone who loves, as you and I do, our Queen who has so long ruled with glory over this country, to volunteer, if he is able, for the service of his fatherland, to go to the front and fight against his country's foes (loud and prolonged cheers). The Imperial Yeomanry have been raised for this purpose, and men in every position and in every rank in life had thrown aside PERSONAL AND FAMILY TIES and have volunteered to go to fight against the enemies of the nation, and 1 believe such a scene as the enlistment of the Yeomanry which has taken place in all our great towns coald not have been rivalled, could not have been approached, in any other country in Europe. The present must make some mark upon the future. The two great Anglo Saxon races, the English and the American—(ap- plause)—I firmly believe are to be the great dominant races of the world (hear, hear). I cannot look at the map of the world without seeing that the destiny of the Anglo Saxon race is written there by the pen of Omnipotence. It is written on the mighty map of India with its ancient civilisa- tion and vast population, and our destiny there is to civilise and to educate the Hindoo people up to a standard when they will be able fitly to govern themselves. It is written on the map of Cape Colony, it is written on the map of Australia, it is written on the map of Canada, it is written on the map of New Zealand, and in each case THE DESTINY OF ENGLAND is to raise up free, self-governing peoples who will carry on our great traditions of freedom to suc- ceeding generations (hear, hear, and applause). But this great end can only be achieved by sacri- fices at the present moment and I would ask every Englishman if he is prepared for any paltry reasons to risk all the great work that has been built up by his forefathers, I would ask if be is willing to risk the work of Cromwell, of Wellington, and of Pitt, and I believe that when these questions are put to a true Briton he will throw aside personal interest, family ties and monetary considerations, and vol- unteer, as he ought, to do his best for his country (cheers). Gentlemen, I THANK YOU, on behalf of myself and of those who have joined the Montgomeryshire Imperial Yeomanry, for the kind way in which you have drunk our healths, and before sitting down I think I ought to say one word in praise of the untiring work and the self- sacrificing devotion and great energy that has been shown by Sir Watkin Williams-Wynn (applause) in raising the regiment. When we go to the front, and I hope it will not be very long (cheers), we shall be actuated to do all that is in our power against the enemy by the knowledge that Sir Watkin is at home looking to the Montgomeryshire Yeomanry to do their duty. I believe that we shall not be found wanting (loud and continued cheering).

♦ A MERIONETHSHIRE DIVORCE…

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