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----------..--------------------------_--TENBY'S…

TENBY MAYORAL BANQUET.,

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TENBY MAYORAL BANQUET., SUCCESSFUL FUNCTION LAST NIGHT. INTERESTING SPEECHES. At the Royal Gate House Hotel last (Wednesday) night the Mayor of Tenby (Captain David Hughes Morgan) entertained the members and officials of the Corporation, the magistrates, clergy, and ministers of other denominations to dinner, the following being the menu :— Soup. Clear Royale. Leek Broth. Fish. Turbot. Lobster Sauce. Fried Soles. Entree. Chicken Patties. Braised Sweetbreads. Removes. Saddle Mutton. Jelly. Duckling. Brussels Sprouts. Cauliflower. Potatoes. Game. Pheasants. Chips. Salad. Sweets. Borough Pudding. Trifle. French Pastries. Savoury. Welsh Rarebit. Dessert. Coffee. Liqueurs. WINE LIST. Sherry-Amontillado. Claret-Olmteau Larose, 1878. Hock-Liebfraumilch Chainpagne-Krug & Co., 1900. G. H. Mumm, 1900. His Worship, wearing the gold chain of office, presided, the guests present being:—The Deputy- Mayor (Mr Councillor T. Tucker) Aldermen Chiles, Griffiths, and Leach; Councillors Farley, Stokes, George Thomas, Truscott, Lord, W. H. Thomas, Mason, Palmer, Sandercock, Davies, and Morrison John Thomas and Thomas John (Ser- geants-at-Maoe). Officials-Messrs. Newton, Mor- ley, Eastlake, Lyons, James Bowen, H. M. Allen and E. Leach (Overseers). The Rector (the Rev. N. C. Ram, M.A.), the Revs. J. D. Fowden, G. C. Rowe, Father Carew, T. Lodwig Evans (Baptist); Messrs. T. P. Hughes (President Tradesmen's Associa- tion), W. Cecil Williams, A. R. T. Williams (Naval Survey), Wilfred Reea, H. Sandercock, junr., and James Hughes. Councillors T. Tucker and F. B. Mason occupied the vice-chairs. The duty having been declared off tobacco, a long and interesting toast list was gone through. In proposing the toast of The King," the Mayor said that every loyal Welshman and every loyal citizen of the Borough of Tenby would drink the health of His Majesty, King George V., who, although he had been on the throne but a short time, ruled with great tact and discretion. (Applause.) The toast was received with musical honours. The Queen, the Queen Mother, the Prince of Wales, and the rest of the Royal Family was next submitted, and received with warm enthu- siasm. Mr Councillor W. H. Thomas submitted the toast of "The Bishops and Clergy and Ministers of all Denominations," and in doing so said he believed that the majority of the members of the Council present in the room had had the pleasure of shaking hands with the Archbishop of Can- terbury, who some time ago paid a visit to Tenby. Many of those present had listened to the present Bishop of St. David's, and they had heard him with admiration; and he (the speaker) dared to say that the Bishop would have liked if their admiration had gone a little deeper. With regard to their present Rector, they had all heard him, of course, very frequently, and with very great pleasure he (the speaker) felt sure. Some of them had the privilege of knowing the Rev. Father Carew, and he was certain that those of them who did not hold the same theological views as the Rev. Father would at least give him the credit for aiming at the same thing. (Hear, hear.) They all felt sure that the ministers of all denomina- tions had but one object in life, and that was to win sinners to the right path. He coupled with the toast the names of the Rector, the Rev. G. C. Rowe, Rev. J. D. Fowden, Rev. Father Carew, and the Rev. T. Lodwig Evans (Baptist minister). The Rector of Tenby, responding to the toast, said that as the Rev. Lodwig Evans was also down to respond he proposed to reply for the Churoh of England, and he did not intend to say anything in regard to the Bishops, although he could sing their praises in very many words. With regard to the clergy of the Church of England, he considered them the hardest working class in the country (hear, hear), and what was more they had not, up to the present, at any rate, gone on strike for a twenty four hours week- (laughter)—and he hoped that they never would. He would just like to say something with regard to the Church, because, as they are aware, they were at the present time face to face with some very serious social problems; and his belief was that the Church, as the keeper and guardian of the Christian spirit, contained a solution of these social problems. At the root of nearly all their social problems was self. Selfishness would be found to be the source of them it might be on the part of the rich or the poor, but selfishness was. the source of their social troubles. (Hear, hear.) The Rev. Father Carew expressed his sincere thanks for the way in which the toast had been proposed and honoured. He had only been in Tenby a short time, about three years, and he came as a stranger to their gates, but he could sincerely say that he had never met a pleasanter lot oi people than at Tenby. (Applause.) The Rev. T. Lodwig Evans also responded, and said he had been in Tenby long enough to remem- ber a great many changes in the civic history of the town. He had known some splendid men who had devoted their services to the borough in the Town Council, and comparing the condition of Tenby with what it was twenty years ago- when he first came to the town-he thought the improvement bad been immense. (Hear, hear.) The Rector in proposing the toast of The Aldermen and Councillors of the Ancient Borough of Tenby," said he did not know why he had been asked to propose this toast he felt rather out of his element in doing so, not because he was a tee- totaler, for now-a-days toasts were drunk just as cordially in soda water or lemonade as in cham- pagne, and the teetotaler was not now looked upon, as he.believed he used to be in days gone bye, as the wet blanket at a feast. But the difficulty he had in- proposing such a toast was what to say, because he would not like to make the aldermen and councillors blush to the roots of their hair by singing their praises. (Laughter.) He thought the aldermen and councillors of Tenby were a most capable body of gentlemen and if he might speak as an experienced man of the world-not in a wicked sense-he thought that perhaps the dan- ger which their public men were in at the present time was that of losing their independence, their personality, and individuality. Now, each of these things had been given us by Providence, each of us had got a personality, an individuality, and created within us a sense of independence. He thought that if public men allowed their individuality and personality tojbe merged, as it were, into a corporate body, then the town or the country was the loser. Might he plead for a spirit of independence among their public men ? (Hear, hear.) Proceeding, he said he knew it was often considered as being very difficult for one man on a corporate body to assert his independence, and be remembered at the last General Election how the services of one of the finest of men were lost to the State in consequence of this. If they did assert their personality and independence it was at some cost and some risk of losing the posi- tion in which they found themselves but still might he plead as their Rector for a spirit of independence among the aldermen and councillors of Tenby ? (Applause.) Alderman Leach, responding, said be was both the youngest and oldest member of the Corpora- tion, the youngest in the sense that he had only that day been re-elected an alderman, and the oldest in that he had been connected with the Town Council since 1888, when he won his first contested election. He took a great deal of pride and pleasure in serving his. native town, and could go back to fifty years ago. As a Corpora- tion they had spent a good deal of money, but he thought they had spent it wisely and well. They had got a well sewered, a well watered, and well regulated town, and he thought they were more prosperous than they were fifty years ago. (Applause.) Alderman Chiles said he could go back ten years further than Alderman Leach, he remem- bered Tenby sixty years ago, and could pretty well recollect everything connected with the town, for he had not been out of the place during that time. (A Voice: "What about the Grand National and Ascot ? Laughter.) Councillor George Lord said he always tried to do his best for the town of Tenby, in which he had a great interest, as in it lay his livelihood. Councillor Sandercock also responded, and said there were not four other gentlemen in the town whom he held in higher esteem than the four Tenby aldermen. With regard to the coun- cillors, they were capable of speaking for them- selves. He had been reminded by a candid friend that he had seen and heard little of hi m in the papers as a member of the Council, but (said the speaker amid laughter) it was not the man who blew the trumpet the loudest or thumped the big drum the most who always did the work; it was the quiet, thinking man. Councillor Stokes also responded. He said he first became connected with the Tenby Town Council in 1865-45 years ago-which was a long time to look back upon, but still it seemed only like yesterday that he came to Tenby. During that time he had made and lost many friends, as they all must; but he would not touch on tender subjects, because he might forget himself, and that he never liked to do, especially at a con -4 U vivial meeting of that kind. Speaking to the toast, he could assure His Worship that the aldermen and councillors always did their very best for that beautiful place. With regard to what the Rector had said about a man retaining his individuality and personality he (the speaker) agreed with him to a certain extent, but on the other hand if a man found his views were not in consonance with the majority on the Council, then he thought it would be far better for that man to sink his individuality and bow to the decision of the majority, otherwise it was impos- sible to get through the work. They had had gentlemen in the Town Council who thought they knew better than anyone else, but they had soon found their level. Councillor Tucker then submitted the toast of His Worship the Mayor," and referred in eulo- gistic terms to Captain Hughes Morgan, whose name he said was a household word in Tenby. The Mayor, rising to respond, was accorded an enthusiastic reception. He said that although he had interests in another county he would spend as much time as he could at Tenby and do all he conld to further the interests of that ancient borough. (Applause.) It had suddenly struck him that a story which he heard over in Ireland was rather appropriate to the town of Tenby. Pat called at a certain house and asked if Mike was in. Mike's wife said he was not at home, and asked Pat if he would have a cup of tea, at the same time asking him to hold the baby whilst she made it. Whilst Pat had the baby in his arms Mike returned, and said How are you getting on Mike?" to which he replied "I'm just about holding my own." (Loud laughter.) Now he (the Mayor) did not want Tenby to only hold its own, but to go ahead. (Hear, hear.) He first came to Tenby in 1888 and was very much struck with the place, and since that time he and his family had come more or less frequently. He felt he could honestly say that the members of their Corporation were individuals with but one ambi- tion in life, and that was the furtherance of that ancient and historic borough. (Applause.) Councillor Lord gave the toast of The Magis- trates," to which Alderman Leach and Coun- cillor Tucker responded. Councillor Tucker submitted that of The Officers," coupled with the names of Mr G. Lort Stokes (Town Clerk), Mr George Lyons (Rate Collector), Mr T. M. Eastlake (Borough Accoun- tant), Mr James Bowen (Borough Auditor), Mr George Lord (Mayor's Auditor), and Mr A. J. Newton (representing the Borough Treasurer), all of whom suitably acknowledged the toast. Councillor F. B. Mason proposed the toast of the new Councillors (Messrs. Davies and Mor- rison), and in doing so thanked the Mayor for the very pleasant evening which he had given them, remarking that if they had had more of this kind of thing the Council would perhaps not have felt the opposition complained of. Two new councillors had been elected on November 1st, and he (the speaker) hoped with the Rector that they would not forget their individuality and independence. With all due respect to some of the ancient members of the Tenby Corporation he asked them to give fairplay to the new members, who were elected by the people the same as they were long ago. Like the older members the younger ones would try—at least he had tried for two years—to do what was right and fair. He asked them to remember this instead of being hard on them. They were working for what they believed to be the true interests of Tenby. (Hear, hear.) Mr William Davies was a new member, who at the first time of asking had been returned at the head of the poll. He was a member of an old Tenby family who be should think built half of the town and at the first time of coming out he had received the place of honour. With regard to Mr Morrison he (the speaker) could say that he had known and appreciated him for sixteen years. During that time he had been his great helper-he might almost say partner—in doing what seemed to them the best in the interests of Tenby. If they did not happen to agree with everybody they only asked for a fair hearing, for he (the speaker) could respect an opponent as well as appreciate a friend. He for one had no wish to impose his views against those of other members, but he had got his own ideas, and he was very much obliged to the Rector for what he had said "about retaining one's individuality and independence. Councillor Davies, responding, said he could assure them that he felt it an honour to belong to that ancient Corporation, but it was still a greater pleasure and pride to follow in the footsteps of his late lamented father, who had had the honour of being a member of that Corporation. During the time his father was a member he endeavoured to keep up the traditions of the family, and he (the speaker) would try to follow in the "same way. (Hear, hear.) His vote would at all times be given in the interests of the ratepayers, and his whole aim would be to do all he could for the benefit of his native town. (Applause.) Councillor Morrison also responded. Although, he said, he was very closely associated with Mr Mason in business, he did not think that fact would influence him in any way or warp bis judg- ment when it came to giving his vote as a Town Councillor. He should vote with but one object in view, the best interests of the ratepayers. (Applause.) The health of the Deputy-Mayor was then toasted after which the company sung the National Anthem and Auld Lang Syne." During the evening Messrs. T. P. Hughes, A. R. T. Williams, G. H. Sandercock, W. Rees, and Harold Sandercock contributed to the musical programme, Mr W. Cecil Williams accompanying. The whole of the arrangements of the dinner were ably carried out by Miss Oaten, the mana- geress of the Gate House Hotel.

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