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SPECIAL MEETING OF THE TOWN…

SPECIAL COUNCIL MEETING.

VISIT OF THE OPEN CHAMPION.…

NO MUNICIPAL CANDIDATES THIS…

TENBY MUNICIPAL ELECTION.…

THE GALE AT FISHGUARD. AI"..

TENBY COTTAGE HOSPITAL. --

COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT'S…

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THREE MEN DROWNED. --

ALL NIGHT ON THE ROCKS.

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ALL NIGHT ON THE ROCKS. THRILLING EXPERIENCES NEAR ST. DAVID'S. The incidents witnessed off the Pembrokeshire coast are described in the following manner by a Press correspondent:—" At eleven o'clock on Wednesday evening signals of distress were observed from a vessel at Ramsay Sound, St. David's. The life-saving apparatus and lifeboat crew were at once summoned, the lifeboat leaving St. Justinian's about twelve o'clock under the command of Coxswain Stevens. The dis- tressed vessel, on being reached, proved to be the sailing ship Democrat, of Barnstaple, which was on a voyage to Porthgain with a cargo of coals. The crew were safely taken off and the lifeboat tried to make her way back, but by this time the mountainous seas and strong tide made it im- possible, with the result that she drifted on to the Bitches Rock in the Sound. As soon as she struck frantic efforts were made to climb the rock. The task was made difficult as the night was so dark and the sea so rough. The lifeboat drifted away, and the men huddled together on the rock till daylight, when it was found that three of the lifeboat crew were drowned, viz., the coxswain, John Stephens, Henry Rowlands, and James Price. People from the mainland who had gone to find the whereabouts of the lifeboat heard their screams, which were pitiful, and saw lights burning, and were able to see the lifeboat bumping against the rocks. The chief coast- guard then summoned the Goodwick lifeboat, which left at 11.20. By this time hundreds of people lined the cliff and spent an anxious time awaiting the boat. A boat from St. David's then went out, manned by Sidney Mortimer and two coastguards. They were soon near the ship- wrecked men, but could not approach them owing to the strong tide and sea. They, however, re- mained there all day and made several efforts to take the crew off. Presently a three-masteed steamer named Yorkshire passed through the Sound, and the people shouted themselves hoarse to try and attract the steamer's attention, but evidently they did not know what they wanted. About five o'clock the St. David's boat made another effort to take the crew off. They were now in a state of great exhaustion, and after several attempts they were taken off. Another boat had by this time arrived and assisted in the rescue. Fifteen were landed off the rocks, tome of whom were lauded at Porthclais and the others at St. Justinian's. The Goodwick motor lifeboat had now arrived and towed one of the boats to safety when they arrived. They said three of their crew had been drowned. Pitiful scenes were witnessed. Some of the rescued crew collapsed, being in a terribly exhausted state, having been on the rock for 14 hours. The skipper of the Democrat was loud in his praise of the gallant efforts of the lifeboat crew, and deeply regretted the distressful occurrence of the loss of three lives. In their efforts to save their lives the crew of the Democrat lost all their belongings, and the mate received nasty bruises on the hands in his efforts to climb the rock. Michael Moriarty, one of the lifeboat crew, interviewed, said that they went to the vessel and took off the crew, but when they prepared to make the return journey they found the wind and tide too strong for them, with the result that their boat drifted on the rocks. They got out the best way they could, and scrambled up the rock, which they had great difficulty in doing. After they got safe footing they huddled together, as the rock was a small one, and the waves were dashing over them. They were in peril of slipping off at any moment. They never dreamt that they could hold out the hours they did, as the sea was running mountains high, and blowing a strong gale. Some of the crew clung to the side of the boat, and David Lewis had a miraculous escape from drowning, as he was unconscious, and had to be shifted to a place of safety. He and another man named Banner bad nasty bruises on their face and legs through being dashed against the rocks. When it became daylight they burned their oilskins in order to attract attention from the mainland, which they succeeded in doing. Then they found that three of their number were missing, including their popular coxswain. They were terribly cut up, and were surrounded by the sea, being about 20 yards from Ramsay Island. When they saw a boat coming out they grew calmer, and the plucky effort made to get them off by young Mortimer and his crew ought to be recognised. The lifeboat will become a total wreck. The Goodwick boat bad great difficulty in coming round, having experienced terrible weather off Strumble Head. The bodies have not been re- covered. A St. David's correspondent's account of the adventure is as follows :—The boat left its station, St. Justinian's, in answer to signals of distress on Ramsav Sound. They took off three of the crew of the ketch Democrat, of Barnstaple. On returning the gale blew them on to the reef and the boat capsized, throwing them all into the water. Than three screams were heard. They endeavoured to scramble on to rocks called The Bitches," a small projection usually covered at high water spring tide. Mr Sidney Mortimer called for volunteers to go from Porthclais to the rescue. He then appealed to the chief coast- guard, and two of his men—Guppy and Husk— volunteered.

TENBY RATEPAYERS' ASSOCIATION.

TENBY ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.—…

TENBY POSTAL MATTERS.

To the Editor of the Tenby…

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