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FIRST ANNUAL REPORT. --

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RESULTS OF A SUCCESSFUL SEASON.…

ADDITIONS TO THE COMMISSION…

GREAT SCHEME FOR VILLAGES.

TENBY COTTAGE HOSPITAL.

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WORK IN THE PEMBROKE YARD.

A HARROWTNCTTALE FROM TENBY.…

A CONTRAST IN HAY CROPS.

THE ART OF MLLE. GENEE. --

! TENBY POSTAL MATTERS.

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TENBY POSTAL MATTERS. To the Editor of the Tenby Observer. SIK,—Some time ago you were good enough to publish more than one letter from me dealing with the management of post office work at Tenby, but as I consider that things are not yet up to the mark" I ask you to spare me still a little more space to air another grievance or two. After my last cycle of letters to the local Press, it is true that some improvement in postal matters did take place, and for the time being I was fairly well satisfied with the accelerated delivery arrange- ments but, alas! the new state of things is not continuing. The season (i.e. the rush of visitors) is over, but instead of getting our morning corres- pondence earlier as a resultant cause of this important fact, we are actually on many mornings of the week getting them latter. Why is this ? Have the authorities with that wonderful eye to economy, generally false in the end when attempted in Government Departments, reduced the staff at Tenby, and thus allowed things to swing round to their former unsatis- factory s.tate? Why, and I ask it in all serious- ness, cannot the residents of the town have their morning letters at the latest by eight o'clock? Surely this is a reasonable enough hour At Bristol,Cardiff, Newport, and Swansea, I under- stand the people there get their first delivery at half-past seven. Of course, they do, for the simple reason that they would not tolerate having them any later. They are public-spirited in those towns, and although red tape may find a lodgment in small benighted places like Tenby and Pem- broke-Dock, there would be no chance for it in other enlightened localities. The most conspicuous feature of the mail deliveries at Tenby is their irregularity. You can never depend upon getting your letters at the same time for two days running. Such erratic behaviour on behalf of the postal authorities would not be stood for five minutes in a business community, but possibly anything will do for sleepy Tenby. Can nothing be done to ensure a regular and early first delivery of letters in this town ? The inconvience, annoyance, and even loss occasioned by this uncertainty in delivery are such that the postal authorities ought really to make some effect to accelerate the first delivery. Nine o'clock is an uncivilized time to be getting your first letters in these modem, hustling, go-a- head days. If the mail train is in at half-past six why should not the letters be sorted and got ready for delivery within the hour ? If the staff avail- able is not large enough to handle the mails more expeditiously then increase it. The Post Office, I take, exists for the convenience of the public, not the public for the convenience of the Post Office. It is supported by public money; it is the most profitable Department in the State; its operations affect the whole of the community; and therefore it should never cease to study how best it can fall in with the needs and wishes of the great public who support it, and yet could not do without it. And the Sunday delivery at Tenby! What shall I say about it? There was a time when we did get our letters at ten o'clock, or even before, but now if we get them just as we are starting out to church we consider ourselves lucky. What is the cause of the delay in delivering letters on Sunday? Why should the public be penalised because there are a few miles to traverse by road, instead of the mails (as on week-days) coming all the way by train ? For the last few months there has not been the slightest dependence on the Sun- day delivery it has been iriitatingly erratic, and calculated to try the most angelic tempers Of the clearances and despatches at Tenby I have not a word to say in complaint; I believe I am correct in stating that they give every satis- faction. It is the deliveries which cause trouble, and the authorities should lose no time in bestir- ing themselves with a view of seeing whether something cannot be done to improve this branch of local post office administration. Summarized briefly, what Tenby wants are earlier deliveries, particularly the^rsf one. There ought, in such a vast organization as the British Post Office, with its unlimited resouroes, to be no insurmountable difficulty in achieving this, even at Tenby, where one is bound to admit local con- ditions are inclined to be somewhat unique, and, at times, unconventional.—Yours truly, Tenby, October 8th, 1910. A MALE. [Although we are pleased to publish our corres- pondent's letter, which, of course, deals with a matter of considerable public importance, we can- not altogether agree with the trend of his remarks. The whole crux of the question of an early and regular first delivery of letters is the train service. Regularity depends entirely upon this, and as long as the mails continue to arrive out of scheduled time, we take it that the deliveries are bound to be correspondingly late.—ED. T. O. [

TENBY RATEPAYERS' ASSOCIATION.

IMPORTANT CONFERENCE AT HAVERFORDWEST.

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